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Performance Art Collective Uses Goldfish Movements To Create Music

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Quintetto from Quiet ensemble on Vimeo.

The artist collective Quiet Ensemble are skilled at making the mundane feel monumental, or at least worth noting. Their installation/ performance art Quintetto is naturally composed of a quintet of goldfish.  The little fish may not realize it, but their movements are of consequence.  Placed in tall tanks, the vertical movements of the fish are monitored and converted into sound.  Each fish is assigned a separate tank.  The installation seems to give some sort of order to the random, and in a strange way lend gravity to something that is trivial.  Check out the video to see the fish in action in full performance art glory!

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Ghostly, Warped Prints and Drawings from Joseph Parra

 

Joseph Parra, who received his BFA in Painting this year from MICA, has started his career with a running start. Back in 2008, he worked with famed architect  Richard Gehry as part of HBO’s Masterclass,  and last year he completed a solo show at Galerie M in Milwaukee, WI. He distorts portraits of absentminded subjects with unorthodox techniques, employing sand paper and collage. Parra’s charcoal drawings, also figurative in nature, are equally of note. His drawings (like his prints) are ghostly. His figures are presented with little distraction, no context or background. This demonstrates a confidence in his image making. He’s showing us exactly what he wants us to see.

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Mark Khaisman’s Film Noir ‘Drawings’ Made With Packing Tape And Lightboxes

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In the past, artist Mark Khaisman has used his signature style of translucent packing tape, acrylic paint/film panels and lightboxes to create an extension of drawing which focused on decorative objects (such as rugs, chairs and fabric patterns), luxury items (handbags) and portraiture (previously here). For his most recent series, Stills, the Ukranian-born, Philadephia-based Khaisman channels Hollywood’s Classic Era and Film Noir into layers of tape, hand-rolled and variously removed so the light shining through each image creates lines, texture and shading.

Although Khaisman freely sources images from a shared historical film lexicon, his work also takes on a thoroughly modern, almost pixelated feel and reference, particularly in his more colorful works. Says the artist of his signature process,

“The tape is the message. A parody on Marshall McLuhan’s famous quote could explain the superficial motives, which make up the work. Subjects are categorized into different groups: fragmented stills from classic cinema, iconic objects from art history, portraits. The works are exploring the familiar as our shared visual history; made of a familiar material formed into a familiar image, asking the viewer to recognize and complete the work, stimulating both memory and interpretation in the process.” 

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Brian Jungen

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Brian Jungen turns every day objects on their heads, revealing the potential for magic and mystery in even the most mundane moments. Above, baseball mitts become a punk-rock mannequin, or a warrior’s armor. Plastic lawn chairs become the hulking exoskeleton of a whale. Hundreds of trash bins become the building block for a sci-fi geodesic dome, or a giant turtle’s vacated shell. His ability to transform is nothing short of alchemical!

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Jacopo Rosati’s Felt Collage Illustrations

Venice, Italy-based artist/illustrator Jacopo Rosati does these felt collage illustrations that are really cool. Rosati, whose clients include -among others- Wired Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and Geico, has a nice sense of color. Each piece really pops and the felt adds a unique texture to his work. The images are so subtle, but they communicate everything they need to through the artist’s clever, economical character design. The superhero piece (above) is especially great. (via)

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Letterpress Tutorial

 

Before everyone used the box that you’re reading this post on to create posters and prints there was a magical thing called Letterpress. It wasn’t the fastest method on earth to create beautiful typography but it sure was functional. Watch a quick how to video on how it was all done back in the day right after the jump!

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Interview: Neil Powell

Artist Neil Powell recently opened the show, “Down By The Side Of The Road” at 222 Gallery on July 10th. The exhibition featured a selection of works on paper and sculptures. Powell’s work evokes a whimsical, yet graphic approach—appearing as indexical maps of personal narrative or scatological documentations. His illustrative worlds are littered with idiosyncratic characters, situations and translations. Neil Powell’s show will be up at 222 Gallery until August 1st. 

 

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Fabio Viale’s Marble Sculptures That Look Like Styrofoam

What at first may look like a Styrofoam Mona Lisa is actually incredibly detailed marble work by Italian artist Fabio Viale. Yes you read that right. Marble. Viale does some incredible work to modernize this “old-fashioned” medium, like re-creating Greek Korus torsos and hands covered in tattoos. He is able to transform this heavy, bulky material into creations that seem light and airy, like old beat up tires, popcorn or crumpled paper bags. Viale even went so far as to create a marble motorboat he called Ahgalla, which remarkably he used to navigate the rivers north of Italy. 

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