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Dori Caspi Captures The Personal And Intimate Moments Of Disappearing African Tribes (NSFW)

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Israeli photographer Dori Caspi has spent 10 years capturing personal and intimate portraits of the Himba African tribe, a tribe that is facing extinction. For this particular series, Caspi traveled to Namibia 15 times and formed a close relationship with the people of the Himba village. This village has been encountering a progressive amount of challenges, including the intrusion of roads upon their land, and the increasingly severe threat of the AIDS epidemic which has the potential to eradicate the village entirely.

“My camera was never used as a tool of anthropological or research-like documentation of the tribes’ way of life, but always as an instrument with which I could express my love for its wonderful people, and my admiration of their inner and physical beauty. They had opened their hearts and huts to me and with time, as we shared deeper and intimate relations, they became my second family.”

Caspi’s most recent project is taking place in Southern Ethiopia, where he is capturing the tribes from the Lower Omo Valley. “In contrary to my intimate relations with the Himba people, here I have to build trust, to create an atmosphere which would allow me to photograph the tribes’ people in a relaxed situation, yet proud and reserved as they naturally are.”

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Studio Orta

studio-ortaFrom February-March 2007, the artists installed ‘Antarctic Village’ in Antarctica, travelling from Buenos Aires aboard the Hercules KC130 flight on an incredible journey. Taking place during the Austral summer, the ephemeral installation coincided with the last of the scientific expeditions before the winter months, before the ice mass becomes too thick to traverse. Aided by the logistical crew and scientists stationed at the Marambio Antarctic Base situated on the Seymour-Marambio Island, (64°14’S 56°37’W), Jorge Orta scouted the continent by helicopter, searching for different locations for the temporary encampment of their 50 dome-shaped dwellings. Antarctic Village is a symbol of the plight of those struggling to transverse borders and to gain the freedom of movement necessary to escape political and social conflict. Dotted along the ice, the tents formed a settlement reminiscent of the images of refugee camps we see so often reported about on our television screens and newspapers. Physically the installation Antarctic Village is emblematic of Ortas’ body of work, composed of what could be termed modular architecture and reflecting qualities of nomadic shelters and campsites.

The dwellings themselves are hand stitched together by a traditional tent maker with sections of flags from countries around the world, along with extensions of clothes and gloves, symbolising the multiplicity and diversity of people. Here the arm of face-less white-collar worker’s shirt hangs, there the sleeve of a children’s sweater. Together the flags and dissected clothes emblazoned with silkscreen motifs referencing the UN Declaration for Human Rights make for a physical embodiment of a ‘Global Village’.

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Qbrk and Nerd, Street Art’s Low Bros

German brothers Qbrk and Nerd make up the artistic duo extraordinaire known as Low Bros. With their awesome creative powers combined, they save urban spaces from being dreadfully dull, leaving their instantly recognizable geometric characters on walls and canvases around Germany and beyond. If you like what you see here, then be sure to check out their respective websites for more creative inspiration!

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Nick Pedersen’s Overgrown Post-Apocalyptic Environments

 

“My goal with this project is to create striking juxtapositions between the ruins of modern civilization and a futuristic ecological utopia.”

Brooklyn-based artist/illustrator Nick Pedersen -whom we featured in the 6th installment of our limited edition book series– recently finished a new batch of work entitled Ultima. The loosely narrative series depicts a post-apocalyptic environment in which conflicts between modern and early cultures, and man and the natural world are given prominent attention. In the world that Pedersen has conjured, overgrown cities (though absent of their typical, busy inhabitants) are full of life. The lush, green environments project a vibrancy that’s really appealing. But the digital works have their quiet aspects too- deer slowly pick their way through the brush; and stoic, masked tribesmen explore their bizarre surroundings. Check out more images from Ultima after the jump.

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Jesse Balmer’s Amazing Linework in Fantasy-Tinged Illustrative Work

 

 

SF dude Jesse Balmer makes drawings and other illustrative works with a comics/animation sensibility and fantasied/mythologically scaled subject matter. Balmer’s characters and good sense of motion make these works really awesome, but it’s his linework that really steals the show. The fluid curves and solid hatching on these are drool-worthy. He’s also been known to use a red and blue “3D” effect in his drawings which pops off really nicely. Put on a bib and take in more of Balmer’s vibed-out work after the jump.

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Tim Groen

Tim Groen is one of those creative types that can do just about anything from photography to design but my favorite work by him are these surreal collages made from vintage advertisements and paintings.

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Briar Mark’s Hand-Stitched Typography

Auckland, New Zealand based designer Briar Mark decided to take some jabs at the computer age with her meticulous hand-stitched typographic illustrations. Consisting of tens of thousands of individual stitches Mark’s retro technique rolls back the hand of time and critiques the ease of typography via the computer. Check out the in process time lapse video of Mark’s at work after the jump! (via)

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Touché

November 11 – December 16 2010

APF Lab 15 Wooster Street, New York City

Fridays and Saturdays 12-6

Or by appointment. Please call: 347 882 9175

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