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Bela Borsodi’s Balloon Caricatures Pose For The Camera In These Ridiculously Cute Portraits

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi is a prolific image maker. And not only does he make brightly colored, cartoonish images by taking photos of balloons wearing funny costumes. Since 1999 he has been taking photographs of still lifes full of humor, optical illusions, weird proportions, color play, and whimsical objects. His work may look like child’s play, but his clients have included Vogue Russia, Bloomingdales, H&M, Puma, Target, Hermes and Swarovski. His hilarious campaigns feature sunglasses casually draped on blocks of cheese, faces made out of folded clothes, outfits worn by invisible people and masked figures juggling shoes. The Austrian photographer says:

I love making things and putting things in an unusual context incorporating various visual languages coming from art and graphic design–eroticism is also a fascination of me that I love exploring. (Source)

Borsodi has a knack for turning the plainest things into something surreal and wonderful. By simply styling, or suggesting a few details, he can animate mundane objects into jovial caricatures. Add a wig to a balloon and it is no longer an inflated bit of latex, but now it is suddenly transformed into Marge Simpson. Or add a few brooches and faux fur to pink balloon, and we go from a child’s party to a drag show. Or another one: just fasten a tie, a belt, wrap on sunglasses and place a pile of string on a strangely shaped balloon, and we now see a boss trying to party on Casual Friday. Borsodi goes on:

Often when you only change the context of things you can find new meaning. Or you add something to an object or you take something away from it. Or you put it upside down. All this can change it – a glass put upside down loses all its original function and becomes just a “thing”. (Source)

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Martin Wittfooth’s Post-Apocalyptic Paintings Of Animals In A Desolate World

Martin Wittfooth - paintings Martin Wittfooth - paintingsMartin Wittfooth - paintingsMartin Wittfooth - paintings

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The dark paintings of Martin Wittfooth depict a frightening dystopia that could be our reality if we are not careful. The world he shows us is a grim and desolate one, void of humans, but full of casualties that our species could easily cause. We see a world of animals suffering from our actions and learning to adapt to their new environment for survival. His paintings are a stark reminder of what could happen if we aren’t aware of, and don’t cease the damage we are causing.

Wolves creep around in a burning wasteland, probably looking for food to eat, or some substance somewhere. Bears tip over old water jugs, or some sort of relic from a time past. Tigers are sprawled out over the hood of a rusty car, surrounded by flowers sprouting out of the trunk. The beak of an albatross is stuffed full of trash, the bird unaware that his chosen items are harmful, and not healthy. The sight of these animals that we (should) cherish trying to survive in an undesirable place should bring out the emotions in us that Wittfooth wants.

Everywhere and at all times, we’ve been busy making things in our present for the simple purpose of communicating something, and thus sending messages into our future. What a peculiar habit. We’re the only species inhabiting this planet that routinely behaves this way, and there’s something really beautiful and profound about that. (Source)

His paintings full of the consequences of climate change, over use, excess pollution and unnecessary producing and consumption may seem dramatic, but are actually just a glimpse into a future that could happen, sooner than we think. Wittfooth paints with a sense of urgency; with a need to tell people things could be getting quite bad, quite quickly. He goes on:

I often think about what the psychedelic thinker Terence McKenna called “The Archaic Revival”: a yearning to look into the past to see meaning, connection, the sacred, looking back at us. I need those reminders sometimes, when the current state of human affairs seems dire and in need of a new perspective. (Source)

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Billboard Abstraction

BRANISLAV KROPILAK billboard photographs

Beautiful billboard photographs by Branislav Kropilak.

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Klas Ernflo

Cute black and white drawings by Klas Ernflo.

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Li Hongbo’s Flexible Paper Sculptures That Abstract As They Pull Apart

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Li Hongbo – Pure White Paper from Dominik Mersch Gallery on Vimeo.

Chinese artist Li Hongbo’s sculptures are quite bizarre. Walking up to them you may think that they are made out of delicate porcelain but as you examine it further you’ll see that it in fact is made out of thousands of sheets of paper manually glued together. As you pull the paper apart the figures twists, turns, bends and abstracts creating stretched out imagery that is at once horrifying and exquisite. (via)

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Ben Venom

ListenToMetalWhileYouSleep

Ben Venom aspires to become the “visual commentator” of the culture found in Southern United States. Having grown up in the South, Ben finds himself immensely inspired by not only the culture, but the politics, history, and identity of his roots.

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Chainlink Fence Transformed Into Shimmering Light Installation

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Soo Sunny Park installation3

This installation by artist Soo Sunny Park is appropriately titled Unwoven Light.  Several sections of chain link fence have been connected and draped throughout the gallery.  The wave-like sections of fence are filled with small pieces of Plexiglas.  Light from the galleries many lamps and the sun at various angles fall through the glass projecting a multicolored pattern more impressive than the installation itself.   Park uses the light as a medium, unfurling from the fence and fully splayed on every gallery surface.    [via]

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Anthony Record

Sprain, Yarn on Burlap, 37" x 47" 2008

Sprain, Yarn on Burlap, 37" x 47" 2008

Anthony Record’s work with acrylic, burlap, acrylic and other materials is really taking me to that happy primary place. Looks like glitter is also involved.

 

 

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