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Myriam Dion Cuts And Slices Newspapers Into Beautifully Intricate Patterns

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A myriad of cut-out patterns invading a newspaper layout. Myriam Dion creates intricate motifs using a scalpel and newspapers she chooses according to their images. This French-Canadian talented student has already been acclaimed for her work. The art pieces she designs are airy reconstructed poems.

Myriam Dion picks front covers from the Herald Tribune, Le Devoir, Cape Cod Times or FT Weekend and selects images which speaks to her. She then creates negative space by hand cutting minuscule patterns. The entire page is cut-out. Generating a halo of waves and starbursts. The ornaments she designs at the edges and around the original shape of the newspaper mimic Arabic patterns and add fantasy to the layout.

The artist has invented her own organic way of transforming a simple medium into an art piece. By cutting and perforating the thin and fragile papers, Myriam Dion is making the rendering even more delicate than it originally was. The colors, thanks to the placement of the cut-outs, twirl and whirl sporadically on the surface.
The pieces, placed on a white background and revealing the negative spaces are treasures meant to be contemplated and used as a mean for evasion. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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Woolly Pocket Presents: Lee Kwang-Ho

Korean Artist Lee Kwang-Ho portraits of cacti, succulents and other plants take a deeper look at the living objects around us that we take for granted. Lee’s work recalls that of Georgia O’Keefe’s in the way that their zoomed-in focus creates abstractions and make us look at these objects in a different way. Lee’s ability to capture light and movement while maintaining a soft focus on the subject gives the paintings an ethereal, dream-like quality.

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Christian Chaize

 

Christian Chaize

 

After being a commerical photographer for the past 20 years, Christian Chaize came to discover a specific stretch of coast in Portugal that both revolutionized his life and his subject of photography. He has been photographing this same stretch obsessively since he found it on vacation in 2004. His series is haunting and lovely, each piece beautifully treated and composed- focused on time and space.

 

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The Date Farmers

The Date Farmers

Honest and inspiring work from California collaborative The Date Farmers. Artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez joined forces after meeting at an art gallery in 1998, and have been on a mission ever since. As American-born Chicanos, The Date Farmers poses unique perspectives on issues of race, wealth and cultural heritage, and much of their work examines the tenuous subject of social injustice, and the relationship between the have’s and the have nots around the world.

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Provocative Photographs Address Systemic And Institutional Child Abuse

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Erik Ravelo‘s photo series Los Intocables, or The Untouchables, captures children pinned up crucifixion style against the backs of adult authority figures. “The Right to Childhood Should Be Protected” subheads the title of this provocative series that addresses the responsibility of adult figures with regard to the harming of children in various contexts. Ravelo places the children at the forefront of issues such as military occupation, tourism, healthcare, religion, and school violence, asking viewers to consider the potential for abuse within these issues and institutions. More photos and a short video after the jump.

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Benjamin Björklund Paints Blurred Faces That Uncover Deep Emotional States

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The paintings of artist Benjamin Björklund unearth and obscure the emotional states of his subjects. Working from a rustic, nineteenth-century farmhouse in Uppsala, Sweden, his muses are often those around him: family members, Solomon (his Great Dane), his pet rabbits, mice, rats, and guinea pigs, as well as the wild animals outside. Faces are painted in soft colors, seeming to reflect the pale light of the northern sun. However, everything seems a bit out of focus; eyes and hairlines and skin meld together, giving the portraits an impressionistic style. Dual forces are at play as the figures shift imperceptibly between reality and abstraction, presence and distance.

Ben’s project is to interpret and convey the inner worlds of his subjects. This is a compelling concept, given that portraiture is traditionally a desired projection of someone—a veneer of their character. Ben’s work, however, is more honest in that it connects the physical surface to the intangible swirl within. His about page explains his approach further:

“Ben’s figurative and portraiture work can, at times, depict scenes bordering on the surreal with characters influenced by those around him existing in various physical or emotional situations. These are usually emphasized through the use of abstracted light and darts of color. These, Ben refers to as ‘happy mistakes’ being borne from spontaneous actions and serving to focus the viewer’s attention whilst adding to the emotional impact on the viewer.” (Source)

In their abstraction, Ben’s subjects become deeply individualistic, while also exploring the metaphysical depths and complexities of human identity.

Ben’s paintings are held in private collections in many cities around the world, including LA, Melbourne, and throughout Europe. You can explore more of his work on his website and Instagram. (Via Hi-Fructose)

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Shoplifter’s Imaginary Entourage Sculptures

Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardottir (also known as Shoplifter) created a playful inanimate entourage.  Her series Imaginary Friends is composed of a number of various sculptures which seem to each vaguely resemble a person.  The Friends appear to be sparsely constructed and made of familiar materials.  It is intriguing for how well they imply human figures considering the little they use.  Imagining a unique personality for each piece isn’t difficult.  Arnardottir also seems to touching on the way identity is expressed in personal adornment and dress.

Really, much of Arnardottir’s work tip-toes between fashion and art.  In fact, her familiarity with style and design has garnered her collaborations with several magazines.  Arnardottir’s art, however, has teamed her up with some especially high-profile creatives such as legendary musician Bjork and super-artists Assum Vivid Astro Focus.

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Kenya Hara’s Architecture For Dogs

If you think your dog sweaters or home cooked dog food doesn’t quite express the extravagant love you have for your dog, you might want to take a note from Kenya Hara designing and building a house specific to their size and aesthetics. Hara is a japanese art director, designer, and architect who commissioned eleven architects from around the world to design tiny structures based on the personalities of individual dogs. I love these. Partially because it’s reminiscent of the fact that humans effectively designed all these dog breeds themselves, but mostly because it is always fun to see dogs’ complete disinterest to things people have spent huge amounts of time designing for them, like presenting newborn babies with the socks you crocheted for their feet–just having no idea what caring even is, much less to care about whatever this thing on or around you. Yet the elegant maze does seem Papillon-esque and the geometric dome like a neurotic pug.  Tons more day-makers after the jump. (via)

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