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Cynthia Consentino’s Surreal Ceramics Mix And Match Heads, Torsos And Legs

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You won’t find cadavers or skeletal remains in ceramic artist Cynthia Consentino’s “Exquisite Corpse Series.” The project takes its name from the Parisian Surrealist parlor game, in which each player wrote a word or drew an image on a sheet of paper, folded the paper to conceal it, and passed it to the next player for his or her contribution. The results were wildly incongruous poems and images, gathered ideas from many minds.

In Consentino’s series, hers is the only mind at work, and the results are strangely charming and more than a little disturbing. The hybrid figures combine animal with human and the occasion household object. They play with the idea of gender stereotypes, something that began to interest the artist after reading a study where five-year-olds were asked to name a representational animal.

“The boys identified with animals that were predatory, and the girls with animals that were cute and cuddly. One girl even answered with a flower. I thought that there would also be girls who wanted to be tigers, but then I remembered loving playing a flower in a school play at that age. (Source)”

To loosen these gender constructs, she made varied heads, torsos, and legs then assembled them in ceramic sculptures of various configurations, some almost life-size. With their softly rounded limbs and pastel and pretty color palette they can seem almost sweet, but the fierce wolves heads and deadly weapons belie their innocence.

“My style seems a bit nostalgic, something from the fifties, or from folk art. It derives much of its character from children’s things: fairy tale, cartoons, dolls, games, as well as the domestic world. The work often incorporates imagery that is loaded with symbolism and history, such as flowers, animals and the ceramic figurine. It is very much about the familiar, things of our dreams, our stories, our childhood. (Source)”

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Erik Jones’ Splices Together Fragments Of Women And Geometric Patterns

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Erik Jones paints a blend of vibrant, colorful, graphic-orientated paintings with hyper realistic, disconnected parts of women’s bodies. Originally from St Petersburg, Florida he moved to New York with $81 and took different jobs in the comic industry – an influence to which he owes his distinct graphic style. They are a original mix of pop styling with hard lines and distinct patterns, sporadic mark making and illustrative details of the female form. High fashion magazine-style renderings of faces, breasts and limbs are broken up and disjointed by digital-like patterns.

Realizing his passion for illustration and figure rendering, Jones initially was drawn to animation and creating stimulating visuals. Not completely satisfied by just animating, he applied the techniques he learnt to painting. He starts his creative process with a photoshoot, or various inspirational photos, then adds the figure reference and refines it digitally. He explains more:

I build on top of the figure as if they were wearing these shapes. I’ll also create patters with the shapes to move your eye around in a structured way. Despite all the clutter and chaos in these newer works, there is something soothing and comfortable in each piece, at least I feel there is. I believe it’s the patterns that you’re subconsciously finding that keep it from being completely chaotic and overwhelming to look at. (Source)

Jones uses several different types of media to build up a textured, layered, collage look. Even though his work is a blend of so many different elements, he tries to give equal weighting to each of them. He says most importantly for him is to keep a harmonious balance, and not to glorify the figure. 

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PEPA PRIETO’s Private World

Pepa Prieto’s work represents a private world of invented characters and imagined environments. For Pepa, this is the equivalent of a visual diary where she can freely explore the world of relationships and their consequences. In order to do this, she creates circumstances and fictional landscapes that take both the viewer and the inhabitants of her paintings on challenging and diverse journeys.

The formal aspects of her works are intuitive and are reflected most clearly in the areas that she paints with a playful, lose gesture. She balance’s the compositions in her work by combining these painterly areas with more abstract geometrical forms.  In Pepa’s work, she seeks to create an inner, personal conversation with the hope inspiring reflection on the part of the viewer as well.

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Last Day Of Our Massive Biannual Subscription Sale!

This is it! It’s the very last day of our Biannual Subscription sale extravaganza.  You have until tonight at midnight to reserve your copy of Beautiful/Decay Book: 7 by subscribing. Not only will you get 3 gorgeously designed books but you’ll get intimate access to hundreds of creatives from around the world via our indepth articles and interviews.

So drop what you’re doing, use discount code discountdecaysub and get a one year subscription for the discounted price of $34.00!

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Yochai Matos’ Installations Made Out Of Light

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Whether or not Yochai Matos is creating an installation to view inside or outside a studio space, he pays careful attention to the way light creates an atmosphere. For his indoor installations, existing studio light can make his work appear more ethereal, something to which “You Are a Saint” affirms. His work sometimes directly addresses the absence/presence of light, as in his outdoor installations “Landscape” and “Flame (Gate).” Because the perception of his work changes with the amount of light available for any installation, the experience of his work is as fluid as the experience of natural or artificial light in any given environment.

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Magic Eye: Ari Fararooy’s Surreal Self Portraits Made With Mirrors Will Play Tricks On Your Eyes

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Just like you shouldn’t trust everything you read on the internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you see. L.A based special effects artist Ari Fararooy‘s latest photographic series is a perfect example of this. Using a tripod, mirrors, a self timer and ‘a few digital manipulations’ he has created a very surreal, and futuristic set of self portraits. He went to Joshua Tree National Park wanting to carry on his creative twists on the latest ‘selfies’ craze.

The goal was to experiment with reflections and explore the various ways I could creatively photograph myself. (Source)

He also had this aim in mind while attending the Burning Man festival in 2014. After he found himself in the strange environment that is the desert, surrounded by many creative people, he began clicking his shutter and coming up with some very inventive camera tricks, involving glow sticks, long exposures, strange perspectives and wide angles. You can see that series here.

His photographs are just as surreal as a Dali painting, but he uses modern technologies and a different set of skills. Be sure to see the extent of his talents to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary on his Facebook and Instagram pages. (Via Fubiz)

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Chris Labrooy’s playful 3D illustrations

I’m absolutely loving the 3D illustrations of Chris Labrooy with their dynamic sense of color, composition, and playful humor. If that’s not enough Labrooy also has a brilliant eye for typography, creating custom typefaces out of everything from people to architecture. (via)

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Shoplifter’s Vibrant Sculptures Made With Hair

Icelandic artist Shoplifter aka Hrafnhildur Arnardottir lives and works in New York. “Her body of work as a whole exists in the gray area between visual art, performance, and design. Shoplifter has worked for several years exploring the use and symbolic nature of hair, and its visual and artistic potential. For Shoplifter hair is the ultimate thread that grows from our body. Hair is an original, creative fiber, a way for people to distinguish themselves as individuals, and often an art form. Humor plays a large roll in her life and work, sometimes subtly, but other times taking over. This humor extends to her love of playing with the juxtaposition of opposites. Like with her hair pieces- they appear beautiful evoking natural forms and plant life, but at the same time hair is considered grotesque and disturbing when it is not attached to the body, like hair in the shower drain. She uses traditional handcraft techniques like knitting, weaving, and braiding to create new forms of textiles, while referring to established methods in art. She is attracted to the playfulness found in folk art, naïvism, and handicraft which all have a strong influence on her organic process of creating work.”

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