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Asger Carlsen WTF Photography!

Something about Asger Carlsen‘s photos are a bit off..but who cares because I can’t get enough of them!

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Video Watch: Because everyone loves bikes

Rick Darge is a new pal of the blog, a talented and funny fellow and we love his new video- a love story about a girl and her bike. Watch the full video after the jump.

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Andy Denzler Blurs The Lines


These paintings by Andy Denzler have a Gerhard Richter feel to them but i’ll give them a pass since i’m a sucker for thick paint!

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Kent Rogowski’s Book Alterations

Love these book alterations and rearrangements by New York based artist Kent Rogowski. Make sure to also check out his puzzle manipulations and inverted stuffed animals also featured on his site. (via)

“Everything that I wish I could be is an exploration of language, emotions and the desire to change and improve one’s self. There is a self-help book for almost every moment and problem in life; from relationship advice to dealing with the inevitability of death. Each large format photograph, pictures an arrangement of title pages and spines, from up to 100 self-help books that are based around a central theme. Together, the titles create larger narratives, which become portraits of emotions, people and events in life.

Because of the ubiquity of the books, an entire lifetime of events can be outlined and made to unfold using the books that were written to sooth those transitions and moments. Since advice often differs, the narratives in the images can change depending on which direction the viewer’s eye moves through the image. Some images have linear narratives (e.g.: From Birth to Death or Side by Side) while others look at patterns in language and resemble the random connections inherent in the thought process (e.g.: You and Me and Am I the only one?).

I am interested in the larger questions of how we communicate and deal with moments of pain and change and the commonalities of those experiences, as well as, the patterns and contradictions that are often inherent in language, advice and differing philosophies.”

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Peter Murphy Celebrates 35 Years Of Bauhaus

“Bela Lugos’s dead, undead undead undead…” sang Peter Murphy to the first of two sold out shows at Los Angeles’ Fonda Theatre a couple of weeks ago celebrating thirty five years of Bauhaus with the Mr. Moonlight Tour. While I would have liked to have seen Bauhaus perform, I wasn’t going to pass up the chance to see Peter Murphy and his band perform an all Bauhaus set.

Opening the show with King Volcano and playing songs like Stigmata Martyr, The Passion of Lovers and of course Bela Lugosi’s Dead, it was definitely a sing-a-long with Peter Murphy kind of night. Peter Murphy looked as cool as ever dancing around stage with his trademark moves. Of course the show wouldn’t have been complete without them ending with the Bauhaus versions of T. Rex‘s Telegram Sam and David Bowie‘s Ziggy Stardust.

The US tour has ended, but he’ll be in Mexico at the Teatro Metropólitan tonight Thursday, August 8th and will follow with shows in Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and ending in Sao Paolo, Brazil on Wednesday, August 14th at the Carioca Club

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Walter Potter’s Curious Victorian Taxidermy

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In 1850, Walter Potter was 15 years old when he first began experimenting with taxidermy. By the age of 19, Potter had already created his best-known taxidermy tableaux, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin” which was displayed, along with his other work, at a pub his family owned in Bramber, West Sussex. Potter’s taxidermy dioramas feature anthropomorphized animals acting out Victorian life scenes. During the Victorian era, taxidermy was a popular practice, and in 1880, a dedicated museum building was opened because the tableaux at the pub had created quite a scene. Over time, the interest in taxidermy declined, and the museum was moved before closing down.

Though Potter’s dioramas could be considered morbid, especially by modern standards, there’s something Beatrix Potteresque (no relation) about his work, mostly in its strange and whimsical Victorianism. “Kittens’ Wedding” was Potter’s last tableaux before his death in 1890; this piece was auctioned at Bonham’s (along with most of the collection) in 2003 for £21,150 (around $35,500). Among those present at the auction were artists Peter Blake, David Bailey, and Damien Hirst, who reportedly bid £1 million (almost $1.7) for Potter’s entire collection, but it was rejected by the auctioneers. This caused the owners of the collection to sue Bonham’s because they believed such an offer should have been immediately accepted in order to keep the collection in tact. In 2007, Hirst told The Guardian that “Kittens’ Wedding” was one of his favorites of Potter’s work: “All these kittens dressed up in costumes, even wearing jewellery. The kittens don’t look much like kittens, but that’s not the point.”

The Telegraph notes, “To a modern eye […]these ‘freaks of nature’ appear eerily macabre. Indeed, some Victorian viewers were outraged by the grotesquery and criticised Potter for abuse of animals, despite a museum disclaimer stating that no animals had been deliberately killed for the collection.”  But then they later explain that not all of Potter’s tableaux were sourced ethically. Before neutering was commonplace, freely roaming farm kittens would often be killed off. Potter had an agreement with a local farmer who provided the kittens; this would explain the high number of participants in his tableaux.

The accompanying images are sourced from Dr. Pat Morris and Joanna Ebenstein’s book about Potter and his work, “Walter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy,” released earlier this year. Ebenstein says that she’s interested in “the context that creates these things, and why certain things come to be seen as bizarre to us, when obviously they weren’t at the time.” (via telegraph)

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Blank William Redesigns The Iconic Stormtrooper Mask Into Three Futuristic Animals

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Like many of us, Blank William grew up a fan of the Star Wars series. Now, he has used his passion and talent as a designer to create a new variety of Stormtroopers—ones with animal features. His feral, futuristic battalion consists of two series, The New Order: White and The New Order: Black. Currently, there are elephant, rhino, and hippo designs, and William has brilliantly meshed the animals’ physical features with the soldiers’ glossy plastoid armor, dark eyes, and ventilation details. Each one is accentuated with gold or silver, giving them a slightly more lethal and formidable appearance. William’s work seems to be playing off the expressionless and ruthless appearance of the original Stormtroopers.

William’s smooth, space-age style is carried into his other works, including a series of animal chess pieces. You can view more of his work on his website. For our readers with Star Wars on the mind—as we know, The Force Awakens is released next month—we’re curious about what you think of William’s reimagining of the iconic Stormtroopers; do you prefer this look for your favourite soldiers? What other animals would be fit to protect the Empire? Comment below! (Via designboom)

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Ellie Coates’ Drawings of Myths, Folklore, and the Renaissance

Through the work of Ellie Coates the viewer is invited into the timeless world of story telling. Combining inspiration drawn from myths, folklore and Renaissance painting she creates the props with which to encourage the imagination of the viewer to weave the narrative. Through the well-known Greek Myth of Medusa the Gorgon Queen Ellie explores and adapts both the anatomy of this formidable character and that of the story surrounding her.

The work deals with entrapment, the female role in storytelling and the close relationship between the beast and the human. Whilst Ellie’s work addresses themes of entrapment it in turn provides the tools for escapism. The otherworldly and uncanny feel is made even more mysterious and mythical through her drawing and making process. The surface of the paper is laboriously prepared with layer upon layer of rabbit skin glue and gesso before graphite is applied with meticulous mark making to give an ethereal and luminescent quality.

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