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PATRICK KRZYZANOWSKI Body Slamming Watercolor

Patrick Krzyzanowski’s watercolors are action packed not just with intricate detail but also with face ripping, body slamming, choke holding, wrestlemania extravaganza.

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Michelle Hinebrook

Michelle Hinebrook’s paintings bring together op-art, hard edge painting, geometric patterns, and psychedelic imagery to create  explosive and densely layered abstractions.

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THERESA HIMMER’s Sequin Landscapes

Gorgeous pixelated depictions of nature in urban settings by Theresa Himmer created out of thousands of sequins.

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Intimate And Intense Photos Of Shaolin Monks




Shaolin Kung Fu, developed in China beginning in 495AD, has infiltrated popular culture in the West. Depending on your age, you might be familiar with the 70s TV show “Kung Fu” or Mortal Kombat : Shaolin Monks. Neither captures the essence of Shaolin Kung Fu. Based on Buddhism, its major forms of expression are martial arts and techniques. Shaolin emphasizes meditation, development of the body through rigorous training, and pain endurance.

Training in Kung Fu is mostly done without an opponent, as it was never meant to kill, and the poetic names of the moves imply that it is more of a meditation than a fight. However, the only difference between breaking a clay jug and smashing a human skull with one’s bare hands is consciousness of will. Despite the commercialization, Kung Fu retains a mystical character closer to a monastic discipline than to the performances of modern gladiators.

Tomasz Gudzowaty captures the monks in artistic black and white. The classical composition of these photographs only serves to enhance the amazing strength, endurance, and concentration of the monks as they train. Gudzowaty doesn’t use effects or manipulation to increase the impact of the images—he doesn’t have to. The monks provide all of the interest themselves: walking up walls, standing on their heads, balanced on a foot and an elbow. They seem fully immersed in their training—oblivious to the camera, wholly in the moment.

“Sports fascinates me as a spiritual practice, which is not readily visible today in mainstream events. I made it my long-standing quest to photograph peripheral, exotic sports.”

This series is a masterful match of content and form, skilled subjects and talented artist.

Via The Mind Unleashed

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Faye Moorhouse’s Amusingly Weird Movie Poster Illustrations Are Better Than The Real Thing

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Faye Moorhouse is a Brighton-based freelance artist known for her raw and weird paintings. Messy lines, odd proportions, and smeared watercolors characterize her highly stylized work. Her subject matter is similarly strange — from violent animal attacks to eerie midnight gatherings to depressed-looking people loitering around rundown towns, everything she paints is a complex mix of childlike play and adult absurdity.

Featured here is Moorhouse’s new series called the Wonky Movie Poster Show, wherein she has illustrated twenty movie posters. As she wrote in an email to It’s Nice That last week, the paintings are intended to be “weird and ugly and hopefully funny” (Source). Her assessment is correct; the eros of the Nymphomania poster is reduced to a bedraggled woman who appears to be yawning, and the stately lion of The Lion King looks apathetically over the white void of his kingdom. By filtering these familiar images through her own bizarre lens, Moorhouse strips away the hype and seriousness surrounding these films and makes us laugh.

Moorhouse’s unique style has gotten her work recognized. In addition to her fun and bizarre self-initiated projects, her clients include The New York Times, Salt Hill Journal, and Epiphany Zine. Visit Moorhouse’s website, Instagram, and Twitter to follow her work. Prints, ceramics, and other goods can be purchased via her Etsy shop. (Via It’s Nice That)

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2-UP is pleased to announce its inaugural edition, a collaborative poster created by artist Monika Zarzeczna and curator Nathan Lee. This is the first in a series of collaborative poster editions to be produced by 2-UP in the coming year. Please join us for a launch party on Saturday, February 20th from 5-7 PM at Printed Matter Inc., 195 Tenth Avenue, NY, NY.

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Merijn Hos’ Quirky Sculptures

Merijn Hos lives and works in Utrecht, the Netherlands. When he isn’t working on an illustration project he creates drawings and paintings that showcase a multitude of idiosyncratic characters and objects. In a new body of work Hos constructs lively sculptural works out of wood and paint. The simplicity of the materials adds an accessibility to his signature quirks.

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Yusuke Asai Uses 27 Different Shades Of Mud To Create Massive Mural

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This dream-like mural is the result of two long weeks rubbing clay, mud and dirt, day and night into the walls and floor of Rice Gallery in Houston. Since 2008 Japanese artist Yusuke Asai has been creating these earth paintings. His latest one, titled Yamatane (meaning Mountain Seed in Japanese) was created purely with locally sourced natural materials. With the help of volunteers and the staff of the gallery, Asai collected 27 different shades of dirt from around Houston. His palette is surprisingly varied – the fertile soils of Texas provided him with many tones of yellows, reds and even a rare shade of green. Wanting to form a connection between his visual art and the location he is working in, he says digging for the various samples is an important part of the process. Asai speaks of his fascination with dirt:

I choose to use the earth as a medium because I can find dirt anywhere in the world and do not need special materials. Dirt is by nature very different than materials sold in art stores! Seeds grow in it and it is home to many insects and microorganisms. It is a “living” medium. (Source)

Not formally trained, Asai learned his image making skills from sketching animals in zoos and visiting the museums of his native Japan. Observing different mark making techniques from other cultures and folklore, he has been building his own version of the natural world for some time. His subject matter also echoes those that are fundamental to primitive societies – that of the nature that surrounds us. Asai says:

Imagery of figures and creatures comes to me in the moment. Fox, bird, cat, and sunshine – everything has a role; parts disappear and something is added. I begin each work thinking of the countless small things that come together to make a larger world. (Source) (Via Colossal)

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