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Indoor Clouds Created Tetsuo Kondo Architects

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

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The architectural firm Tetsuo Kondo Architects makes creative use of a unique material: clouds.  They carefully manipulate the humidity and temperature in buildings to create indoor clouds.  This eventually creates three distinct layers within the room with actual clouds gathering in the middle.  The firm uses the space to allow visitors to experience the cloud from below, within, and above.  In a way clouds are architectural components of the natural world that serve several practical purposes.  Tetsuo Kondo Architects pull these clouds inside not only as a strange material, but also as a symbol of the relationship between architecture and the surrounding environment. (Via Collabcubed)

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Monster Trucks!

 
 

Artist Keith Loutit combined two techniques – tilt-shift and time-lapse photography – to create a “dreamy” impression of the monster trucks rally in Brisbane, Australia. In tilt-shift photography, objects are made to appear small and toylike by altering the camera’s lens to narrow the image’s depth of field – the portion of a scene that appears sharp. By running together 15,000 of these still photos – taken over three hours at the event in November – he created a magical time-lapse animation that has earned plaudits across the web. The self-taught artist’s videos, including footage of swimmers at Bondi Beach in Sydney produced using a similar technique, have attracted huge numbers of views on video-sharing websites such as Vimeo. 

Read the rest of the article in The Telegraph

Thanks to Mark Schoening for the link.

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Gao Brothers

Gao Brothers

Beijing based fraternal pair Gao Brothers have been collaborating on nstallation, performance, sculpture, photography works and writing now for three decades and shocking museums around the world with their guerrilla tactic art, one such featuring an apologetic Chairman Mao on his knees with a detachable head. Exhibitions by the Gao brothers, whose work the authorities find politically challenging, have been shut down in the past, and their studio has been raided. So they keep the head of Mao hidden in a separate location — reuniting it with its body only on special occasions to show friends and colleagues. Normally, the body of the statue remains headless, unidentifiable and nonthreatening.

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Kooky Cacti- New Works by Brian Willmont

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Brian Willmont (who we featured in Book 3) recently added a new selection of works to his portfolio. His wacky wild west cast of cacti include Clint Eastwood style brambly bandoleers and prickly pistol-iers. The spook of the frontier’s ghost towns, outlaws and mining carts are infused with Brian’s unique sense of humor. I mean really, what’s better than a desert plant sporting oversized cowboy hats and shades?

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Olafur Eliasson’s Your Rainbow Panorama

Olafur Eliasson’s  dazzling “Your Rainbow Panorama” is a permanent installation on the rooftop of the ARoS Museum in Aarhus, Denmark.  The spectacular work of art has a diameter of 52 metres and is mounted on slender columns 3.5 metres above the roof  of the museum. Visitors can literally walk through the entire color spectrum viewing the world for the first time in all pink, green, blue and yellow tones.

“Your rainbow panorama enters into a dialogue with the existing architecture and reinforces what is assured beforehand, that is to say the view of the city. I have created a space which virtually erases the boundaries between inside and outside – where people become a little uncertain as to whether they have stepped into a work or into part of the museum. This uncertainty is important to me, as it encourages people to think and sense beyond the limits within which they are accustomed to moving”. -Olafur Eliasson (via gaks)

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Sheila Hicks’ Larger-Than-Life Tufts Of Fibers Create Wonderfully Tactile Installation

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Some works of art look so wonderfully tactile that you’re drawn to want to touch them. Such is the case of Séance by American artist Sheila Hicks. The larger-than-life installation features huge tufts of colorful fabric stacked on top of one another. It was recently presented by Demisch Danant at Design Miami/Basel’s Design at Large Program.

A black-painted curved wall is covered with giant splotches of vibrantly colored wool, linen, and cotton. Crafting them utilized a processes that originates as pure powdered pigment and is later combined with a binding agent that creates a pliable fiber. This process is symbolically thought of as translating color into 3D form which is then repeated again and again for the purpose of Hick’s installation.

The multi-faceted Séance features a suspended column and a “color table” in addition to the things against the wall. A waterfall of individual strands pour from the ceiling onto a stack of blobs below them, carrying a powerful visual. The color table encourages viewers to create color combinations based on their own associations. When they’re done, they can share and trade them with other participants and piece together a unique narrative. (via designboom)

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Michael Willis

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Michael Willis‘ visual language doesn’t consist of any single point of reference. Rather, it is a syncretic blend of multiple styles and influences – a sort of hodgepodge of 60s psychedelia, 80s computer graphics, and a modern view of pop culture. Imagery sometimes includes figures that are in the American cultural unconscious – Frank from Blue Velvet, for example, makes an appearance in a drawing. But more often than not this outlook on pop culture, especially looking back towards the 60s and 70s, is expressed through the utilization of stock imagery of anonymous, yet clearly old, photographs of people from days of yore.

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Vlasta Žáková Sews Emotion, Experience, And Desire Into Textile Pictures And Human Sculptures

Vlasta Zakova - Soft Sculpture

“Fajčiaca / The Smoking One” (2010). Soft sculpture, textile.

Vlasta Zakova - Textile

“Narodeninová párty / Birthday Party, A3” (2008). Handmade embroidery on textile.

Vlasta Zakova - Soft Sculpture

“Lilith v akcii / Lilith in Action” (2009). Soft sculpture, textile.

Vlasta Žáková is a Slovakian artist who uses fabric to create pictures and soft sculptures that quite literally “explode at the seams” with human emotion, experience, and desire. Her technique involves hand and machine sewing, and various materials are layered and embroidered into her works until they take on a painterly, three-dimensional effect. In addition to her textile “paintings,” Žáková also creates life-size human figures, which are realistic, surreal, humorous, and saddening all at once. Her sculptures include a woman crying alone in the corner, with red threads to indicate her tear-stained face; a man straddled by a nearly naked woman in a hallway, while a dog looks bizarrely on; and a headless body slumped against a wall, its knees split open and arms frayed off.

In both her pictures and sculptures, Žáková’s main inspiring influence is the party scene, and the types of intimacy and shattered states these events often result in — hence why her work consistently depicts despair, eroticism, and/or debauchery. In one particularly striking sculpture, Žáková took the image of a crowd of people, fused it together, and created a horrifyingly exuberant and multi-limbed creature. This work was presented at the Red Gallery (London) in a performance titled Ultraviolet Movement (2013). Combined with physical animation and UV lights, the soft sculpture embodies the darkness, hedonism, and semi-lucidity of a late-night party. The video Nocturne (embedded above), which Žáková made in collaboration with Jakub Gulyás (video) and Martina Vyskupová (performer) as part of an exhibition project in the Bunker of the Nitra Gallery, features this grotesque “puppet” as it takes on an eerie life of its own.

What is beautiful and provocative about Žáková’s work is that she has brilliantly infused her textile creations with their own emotional and erotic lives; many of us can probably relate to the states of disrepair and desire she expressively depicts. Visit Žáková’s website to see more of her work. You can read about her time at the Red Gallery here and here.

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