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Rob Simons

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Grainy, dreamlike images from Rob Simons. In addition to being a photographer, he also had a collection of his stories, Things Kept Burning, published in September 2006. He also collaborated with German director Werner Herzog on the script for Rescue Dawn. He also used to be an English Professor at Cosumnes River College in Sacramento. Basically, he’s pretty talented.

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Derek Aylward

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I am in love with Derek Aylward’s use of mixed media and flat renderings that create these amazingly haunting images that are just congested with expression and mood.

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Martin Kilmas’ highspeed exploding images

 

 The images of photographer Martin Kilmas are created by dropping porcelain figures at heights of 10 feet. The sound of the figurines hitting the floor triggers the shutter of the camera. The results are razor sharp images of disturbing beauty-temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high speed technology. (via io9)

 

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Super Meta-Meta Representations

RobbieAugmainRobbie Augspurger liked his 2 page spread in B/D Book 3 so much, he made this super meta-meta representation of a photo of a photo of a photo of a….wait. Anyway, here is an image of his contribution resting on an amazing Ionic-period Roman column/plinth held by the same people, in the same outfits… in the photo! My future self seriously just went back in time on the most excellent adventure and bogus journey all at once. More images of Book 3 and his spread floating in timeless cosmos and dusty gradient-ridden liminal spaces below.

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Irresistible Photos Of Nudes Completely Engulfed In Gallons Of Honey

Blake Little - Digital Photograph

Blake Little - Digital Photograph

Blake Little - Digital Photograph

Blake Little - Digital Photograph

Award winning photographer Blake Little completely transforms the classic nude figure into a sleek, sticky, sculptural entity in his series Preservation. Little, known for his skills as a portrait photographer, captures each of his subjects after he pours gallons of honey onto their nude bodies. With its use of honey, this seductive and sticky-sweet series has a unifying element that breaks down the differences in the subjects. Little’s models are extremely diverse with a wide range of body types. However, the honey breaks down the unique and personal details of the person and allows them to become a more universal, timeless figure. They all adopt an ageless beauty that one might see in classic, Greek sculpture.

It is no coincidence that Little has chosen the title Preservation for a series that takes contemporary subjects and gives them a more classic and traditional look. By transforming a unique body into an archetypal figure, they can withstand the test of time. They are now one of the unforgettable figures in art history such as Venus of Willendorf. Not only does this amazingly transformative honey preserve the importance of the figure, but also it allows the figures to look as if they have been literally preserved as they are encased in honey, not unlike the citizens of Pompeii preserved in ash.

The dripping, glossy texture is palpable in this incredibly intimate and tangible series. Preservation were on view at the Kopeinkin Gallery in Los Angeles from March 7th to April 18th, where the photographer is represented. Blake Little’s book Preservation, containing sixty-eight photographs of his honey-filled nudes, is also available. Here is an excerpt from the Forward of Little’s book, written by Kenneth Lapatin, Associate Curator of Antiquities at the Getty Museum.

Since its invention in the 1800s, photography has been employed as a key tool of archaelogy, caputuring images of not only finds, but also the very processes of recovery. Its capacity to record the details of perishable objects – to preserve them – is evident in historical photographs of now degraded artifacts and of excavation sties, many substantially transformed by the very act of digging them and scarcely recognizable today. But today we are also well aware that photography can be far from objective; that it can be manipulated; that it can create something entirely new, original, and surprising.

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Made For Glory Sign Co.

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Derek McDonald & Scott La Rock are keeping the art of the hand-painted sign alive at Made For Glory Sign Co.! I had the opportunity to watch these two in action last weekend at the Tiger Rose Tattoo & Music Festival where they demonstrated, in person, their steady hands and their unique art form. This duo hails from the California’s Bay Area but their work can be spotted around the world; from Barcelona, to Spain & even Japan

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Studio Visit: Leon Reid IV’s Public Art

I stopped by Leon Reid IV‘s studio in Greenpoint to see what he’s been up to lately. He’s been pretty busy. Last month, he installed “100 Story House” a public art piece created in collaboration with Julia Marchesi. And he released a new sculpture series less than two weeks ago. On top of all of that, he’s in the midst of raising funds for “A Spider Lurks in Brooklyn”, his proposed project to put a giant spider between the cables of the Brooklyn Bridge during October of 2014 (you can get involved with the project here). So I was pretty psyched that he was able to make time to show me around. Leon’s been creating public art in some form or another for eighteen years now, and his studio was full of past projects and concept sketches.

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Chester Gould

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In late 1978, an exhibition of cartoonist Chester Gould‘s (d. 1985) art for his strip, Dick Tracy, was held at the Museum of Cartoon Art (now defunct) in Port Chester, NY. In the catalog published to coincide with the show, there is a massive appendix of 200 characters Gould created for the strip over the years. Now I’ve never read Dick Tracy as it was a bit before my time, but I had absolutely no idea it was so weird. The characters have bizarre appearances and names like Flattop, Nothing, and Vitamin Flintheart. Matt Masterson, the man who put the appendix together, says:

When I asked Chet Gould where he got the names for some of his characters, he told me he used to ride the train from his home in Woodstock, Illinois to his studio in Chicago and sketch various people he observed on the train. He would exaggerate upon certain features or characteristics. The name would follow, with he one exception being Flattop, whose name came from the popular aircraft carrier of World War II.

Some of my favorites are after the jump, but if you want to see the whole collection, click here.

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