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Photographs Of Bullets Cut In Half Show You Ammo Like You’ve Never Seen Before

AMMO AMMO

For her series AMMO, Sabine Pearlman documented a collection of World War II era ammo with some 900 images.  The bullets are bisected to reveal its inner workings, like some kind of munitions autopsy.  The simple compositions burn off the vaguely violent shroud that envelops the images of bullets and their symbolism.  Instead, Pearlman presents the purely technical mechanisms of war, a reification of weaponary.  The photographs reveal the surprising amount of innovation and craft dedicated to causing physical harm.   [via]

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Vally Nomidou’s Paper Figures

 

Vally Nomidou’s series of life-size sculptures are all made of paper and depict young women and young girls. The female figures impress with the naturalness of their features and poses, the perfection of modelling and the beauty of volume.
Paper, Nomidou’s dominant material, now becomes a key component in her creative process, inextricably linked to painful and systematic research on the technical level, as well as on that of aesthetic integration. The artist respects her material and, although it is cheap and vulnerable, she does not “adulterate” it by using other materials. Moreover, she does not use it as a shell, an encasing to cover a necessary inner structure by providing a fake, idealised skin. Nomidou builds and shapes her works from the inside out solely using paper and paperboard. The internal cardboard frame is built with a vertical and horizontal grid in order to be able to support and render stillness in her sculptures, while also ensuring balance in  contraction and expansion. The homogeneity of her material allows the equilibrium in the behaviour of the interior and the exterior, and thus ensures its duration.
Regarding her technique, the perfect rendition of facial features, of expression, of the naturalness of pose, of body proportions, is based on a process of combining partial plaster casts, the meticulous observation of an exhaustive photographic documentation of her sitters and a painful processing of the outer skin. The perfect prints are synthesised, cut, sewn, glued, rubbed, and through the mastery of her touch achieve the fully realistic rendering of her sitters.

 

 

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Trent Reznor’s How to Destroy Angels Release New Single

Trent Reznor and his wife Mariqueen Maandig are back with a new How to Destroy Angels EP (An omen, out Nov. 13) and a new single out now called Keep it Together. I have yet to see them live, so here’s hoping they play a few dates soon. You might want to turn this one up!

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The Amazingly Expressive Origami Of Nguyen Hung Cuong

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Vietnamese paper artist Nguyễn Hùng Cường creates origami pieces in a style that is distinctively his own.  His pieces often begin with dó paper – a unique paper, made from the bark of the rhamnoneuron balansae, that is traditionally made throughout many of Vietnam’s villages.  Typically striving to create his work from only one sheet of paper, he has been known to often fold work from a single bill of Vietnamese money.  Nguyễn has been working in origami since he was just a small child creating his first original piece at ten years old.  [via]

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Nicola Samori Scratches The Surface Of His Dark And Intense Paintings To Unveil Previous Layers Of Work

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The work of Nicola Samori depicts dying corpses and mysterious portraits scraped, scratched and torn on the surface, unveiling layers of contrasting paint. Dark and intense paintings, covering layers of existing work, like flesh covering the accumulation of past experiences and traumas. The artist chooses to damage his previous paintings on purpose. He feeds the canvas, daily; until the texture becomes ’intense and palpable’. Using his fingers or a knife to destroy the apparent layer, the result of what feels like a painful process is a magnificent harmonized agony. By scraping his paintings, Nicola Samori tries to search for true identity. A person’s face on a painting is not a valid representation of who this person really is. It doesn’t give a true essence of its inner personality and soul. Exploring what’s underneath the surface is the purpose of the artist.

Body, death and painting are, for Nicola Samori, subjects of obsession. By punishing the three altogether on the canvas, he opens the wound and sets himself free. His layered macabre creations are the structure for his catharsis (act or process of releasing a strong emotion into an art form or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration).
Apart from the fact that the artist doesn’t fancy working with colors, according to him; the source of darkness does not reflect a state or a belonging; what is made from it is what’s interesting. A rough process symbolizing metamorphosis of deep emotions into meaningful and empowering art pieces

Nicola Samori’s work will be exhibited at Galerie Eigen+Art Leipzig in Berlin until September 2015. (via Empty Kingdom)

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Lado Pochkhua

One solid consistency in Lado Pochkhua‘s work is the presence of people. Complexities lie in in the details of dress, color and landscape — objects that outlast the individuals they surround. In the vein of what outlasts what or whom, elements are selectively obscured creating, perhaps, one big memento mori. Pochkhua is a Georgian artist living and working in New York.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Darren’s Great Big Camera

This short documentary follows Darren Samuelson as he ventures out to San Francisco’s Lands End to try his giant homemade camera.The camera took over 7 months to build, shoots 14×36-inch x-ray negatives, and stretches out to 6 feet in length! Watch the full documentary after the jump!

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Rebecca Morgan’s Ceramic Vase Caricatures Of Appalachian Hillbillies

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Rebecca Morgan is a wonderfully playful, expressive artist producing mostly drawings, paintings, ceramics and cutouts, all based on characters and stereotypes from her native Appalachian area in America. Long term fans of Morgan’s, we have actually featured her previous series of portraits of rednecks and peasants- ‘Deliverance‘, here on B/D. This time we are enamored with her latest ceramic collection of gnarled, twisted, almost gruesome jugs. As with her 2D work, Morgan takes inspiration from the off-beat “bumpkin” (as she calls them) folk she grew up around.

Her ceramics are quite the sight – with bulging eyes, leering at you, and with crooked smiles, mouths full of oddly shaped and yellowed teeth. Their colors are quite unsettling as well, some vases a sickly blue-green tone; another is bright pus yellow; some vases glazed in a metallic sheen; and yet another made from a dull grey ceramic with ghastly warts plastered all over it’s face.

Stylistically, Morgan embraces hyper-detailed naturalism, influenced by Dutch painters such as Memling, Brueghel, and Van Eyck, as well as absurd, repulsive caricature suggestive of underground cartoonists like R.Crumb. (Source)

The influence of underground comics are definitely evident in Morgan’s work and she makes sure to embrace a healthy dose of lewdness, as does Crumb. She obviously delights in pushing the boundary between repulsion and attraction; the grotesque and the ordinary. Thankfully these vases are neither repulsive, nor grotesque, and they are far from being ordinary.

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