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Megan Bogonovich’s Ceramic Sculptures Of Oversized Coral Reefs Are Detailed Fairytales

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In New Hampshire-based artist Megan Bogonovich’s magical ceramic sculptures, well-dressed women and men peek into gigantic anemones and castle-like coral reefs, plunging headfirst inside like Alice in Wonderland. Looking at the sculptures is similar to reading an enchanting fairytale, with each ornate detail given the attention and intricacy usually afforded to the illustrations in a children’s storybook. Bogonovich’s eye for detail is perhaps most evident in the underwater creatures poised to swallow their small-scale human counterparts. Made colossal in comparison, they foster the sense of wonder and impending adventure that Bogonovich is so adept at creating for each of her sculptures. There’s no end to the number of details one can glean looking at just one of Bogonovich’s sculptures, from the little girl peering into the rose-like openings in a slab of coral to the woman on the cusp of falling headlong into a multicolored anemone that, with its open valves, strongly resembles a human heart. Bogonovich’s sculptures are painted in vivid pastel colors of yellows, pinks, and greens, which lends them an even stronger storybook aesthetic. This serves them well in conjuring up all of the magical scenarios to follow the spellbinding scenes her sculptures capture. (via Hi Fructose)

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Shae DeTar’s Hand-Painted Vintage Images Of Beautiful People Have Obscure, Psychedelic Beauty

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New York based fashion photographer Shae DeTar has made a dazzling collection of work by hand painting printed photographs. Her style of painting is colorful and playful, adding a touch of eccentricity reminiscent of the 1960s. A few of the photographs feel like work inspired by Salvador Dalí, and one or two look very reminiscent of paintings by Henry Darger.

Starting out as a model, DeTar would do experimental visual work on the side. Eventually, praise for her early collage work led her further in the experimentation of painting photographs.

Hand-painting was popular prior to the release of color film, which did not happen until the mid-20th century with Kodak’s release of Kodachrome. Until that point, photo retouchers used dyes, oil, crayon, and/or watercolor paints to add life to black and white negatives, and later on moved on to paint the actual photographs as well. This process originally served an important purpose: to heighten the realism of the photograph and/or to illuminate an artistic aspect. In this case she fulfills both, by creating a warmth within the composition that seems to radiate. DeTar makes you feel like you could almost touch the image, while complementing and enhancing the shot. Her work draws the viewer into the foreground of the picture. Her use of off-coloring; pink skies, rainbow rocks, psychedelic mountains, make the images spark and pop, grabbing the viewers eye.

The marriage of old and new technology creates the illusion of an eternal epoch. A time that is not now and not then, and has an ethereal presence.

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Anton Abo and Ooli Mos

Together, artists Anton Abo and Ooli Mos make up Orka Collective. The like-minded, Eastern block natives draw inspiration from nature, animals, people, and magic in the creation of their predominantly black-and-white illustrations.

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Slovakian Artist Duo Burn Spooky Pagan And Ritualistic Motifs Into Hardwood

Jarmila Mitríková & Dávid Demjanovič Jarmila Mitríková & Dávid Demjanovič Jarmila Mitríková & Dávid Demjanovič Jarmila Mitríková & Dávid Demjanovič

Jarmila Mitríková and Dávid Demjanovič are a fascinating artistic duo adding spice back into a traditional form of art-making. They hail from Slovakia and employ a technique called pyrography, which involves burning into plywood and shading the images with wood stains. This particular way of mark making was popular with people mostly during socialism in former Czechoslovakia. A style with is linked with folk art, domestic crafts and cultural traditions, the pair tap into their own history and national identity.

In their hybrid style you can see christian traditions, folklorism, pagan rituals, superstitions, myths, local legends with links to WWII and socialistic history, all with the backround of real slovak scenery. (Source)

Mitríková and Demjanovič play to their strengths of storytelling and creating very strong, personal images. We see very graphic scenes being played out – hunting rituals, exorcisms of some type, sacrificial set ups, and masked people involved in cult-like activities. With titles like Guardians of National Spirituality, Procession With Nazi, Cult of Goddess Morena, Dance Plague and Evacuation of Slovakian Elites, they focus on a time of secret societies and unknown mysterious behavior; they speak of a time when not everything was understandable, or explainable.

Typical for their practise is working with mystification and creating thematic series, where they focus their attention on one subject from our present or history….. when they work with real slovak subjects, using their style of storytelling, they create absurd, comic situations and new contextual reading. (Source)

This talented couple manage to recreate a sense of wonder, secrecy, ambiguity and riddles. They put a contemporary spin on an ancient art of wood burning and telling campfire-stories. 

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B/D Best of 2010 – Human Bread, Anyone?

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Fe, Fi, Fo, Fum. I smell the blood of an Englishman, Be he living, or be he dead, I’ll grind his bones to mix my bread! Someone took the old British nursery rhyme a little too far it seems…In honor of the upcoming holiday, I’ll only be posting creepy art on the blog….In case you’re wondering, no, B/D has not gone into the gruesome business of baking humans- what you see is the artwork of Kittiwat Unarrom, a Thai artist and baker who sculpts macabre edible creations. He got his inspiration from working in his parents bakery- talk about playing with your food! I found a video on YouTube of the artist at work below- it seems to only be Thai but its cool to see the 3D works…

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Elif Varol Ergen

By now you know I have a soft spot for illustrators that delve into the dark side so it should be of no surprise that I’m posting the blood covered, head splitting, and eye popping drawings of turkish illustrator Elif Varol Ergen. Not only are these works delightfully grotesque but they are beautifully drawn with an iconic color palette of red, black, and baby blue for good measure.

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Tiny Being – the existential work of Cody Pallo

Cody Pallo - The Middle Ground

Cody Pallo investigates the human existence and its relation to the vast universe surrounding us. Simple yet effective. His work is playful, but manages to ask important questions.

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Endearing Photographs Of People Explaining And Gazing At Art

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The photographs of Matthew Monteith‘s series Guardare turn the subject back on to the viewer.  His images depict people explaining, gazing at, and otherwise admiring art.  When I first heard about the series I was prepared to be annoyed with the pedantic gestures and expressions of people acting smarter than thou.  However, the photographs are surprisingly endearing.  People are visibly moved, sincerely engaged with the work often just out of frame.  Guardare perhaps suggests that the art in a gallery doesn’t happen with the work but between two viewers discussing it.

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