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Still Sculptures Evoke Dream-like Performances

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Ángela Lergo is a Sevilla based artist specializing in sculpture and set design. Much of her work is centered around the human body and its evocation and relationship to its environments. Her background in set design has allowed her to play with the way space, lighting, and sculpture arrangements contribute to a particular atmosphere. Though the works are sculpted and stationary, they evoke a hint of performance in their presentation. Using human figures as a mode of expression, Lergo creates dream-like landscapes and resonances that are both poetic and emotional. Lergo uses a variety of materials for her installations, including ground stone, polyester resin, epoxy resin, wax, LED lights, video, sandstone, aluminum, feathers, industrial containers, and black oil.

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Mark Gonzales Studio Sale

MarkGonzales-Sale Legendary skateboarder and artist Mark Gonzales is getting ready to do some spring cleaning, and if you are in New York you can reap the benefits.  The Gonz is hosting a studio sale, selling original drawings, zines, shirts, and much more.  The sale takes place at 580 Broadway on March 29th from 11-8PM.  Hit the jump for some more from Mark.

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Great Art In Ugly Rooms

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The Tumblog’s premise is simple and title explains it well: Great Art in Ugly Rooms. Masterpieces are brought out of the museums and galleries then digitally moved into rooms ranging from boring to horrid.  While nothing changes about the work itself, something is certainly different.  Perhaps it underscores the oft underestimated importance of a stark gallery setting.  Maybe it reveals that beauty is superfluous in the makeup of a masterpiece.  It can be that the juxtaposition between the ultra high priced pieces and their economically humble setting is in itself jarring.  Regardless, this initially funny blog presents some serious questions about art and its context.

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7 Days To Submit Art To Future Perfect!

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The future is unwritten but it is in your hands! You now have only 7 days to submit your artwork for our next book. Visit the Future Perfect website for all submission guidelines and make sure to submit all your work by March 29th!

Time is running out so join us in creating a future perfect!

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Janet Echelman’s Aerial Rope Sculpture Forms A Technicolor Cloud Above Boston

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Artist Janet Echelman has joined forces with global design firm Arup to create a magnificent sculpture, which is now hovering 365 feet above Boston. The sculpture is made up of polyethylene tied into half a million knots, the total weighing about a ton. In daylights it resembles a giant net but when night falls, it is illuminated in ways that echo the Northern Lights and give a new visual dimension to the piece.

Echelman’s craft is inspired by rope weaving techniques she picked up from fishermen during her time in India. In this piece, she has combined the functional aspects of a fishermen’s net and the complex, yet simple beauty of nature. The piece appropriately entitled “ As If It Were Here Already” reflects the way in which the piece is somewhat natural in its form, reminiscent of clouds, vines and even spiderwebs.

Her cocoon like sculpture is at the junction of the natural and artificial world which are in turn reinforced by the context of the piece: hanging above a major American city. The illuminated pieces of her sculpture change with the movements of the wind. Her collaboration with a group of engineers has also given her work a more technical, manufactured aspect. The combination craftsmanship, technology and art gives this piece a stronger voice in the sense that is also reflects what the city is made of. It gives a sort of supernatural aspect to the urban atmosphere and complements the night sky while fitting in perfectly with the city in the daytime, as if it were already there.

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Kenji Shibata Photographs Of Frozen Flowers Float In Limbo Between A State Of Beauty And Decay

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Photographer Kenji Shibata‘s latest exhibit, “Locked in the ether,” is full of contradictions. The flowers he photographs are dead but their last breaths are immortalized in ice. They’re floating in limbo, lost somewhere ineffable, blushing still with color and life.

Shibata arranges them carefully within their icy tombs, with as much care as any botanist would. Choreographed by an expert hand, the flowers become more than themselves: alien landscapes, abstract smears of color, stunning centerpieces veiled by frost.

Yet as tenderly as he gave them new life, Shibata also lets the ice thaw. He photographs the blossoms’ descent, depicting them as vulnerable, exposed, dying once more. It’s elegant but also a little tragic. It’s gorgeous maybe because it’s ephemeral — the transition from vibrant summer to autumn to a long, quiet winter.

“Locked in the ether” is on display at the Tachibana Gallery in Osaka, Japan until December 20, 2014. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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Mother And Daughter Collaborate On Surreal Illustrations

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It’s hard not to be absolutely delighted with this story and these illustrations. Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist who used to keep her art projects separate from her daughter’s as a way to maintain control of artistic direction. One day, that changed when her 4-year-old insisted that Hendricks share her new sketchbook with her, finally berating her with, “we might have to take it away if you can’t share,” something Hendricks told her daughter often. So Hendricks let her finish the bodies of many faces she’d started (informed by old black and white movie stills), and was surprised and delighted with the results. Hendricks claims her daughter often has a focused direction when finishing a piece, and that her imagination is unpredictable.

After her daughter finishes drawing, Hendricks adds color and highlights, texture and painting to complete them. Her daughter critques most of them a bit harshly, but ultimately enjoys their collaboration. As for Hendricks, the collaboration means more to her than the creation of interesting and unique illustrations:

“…From it all, here are the lessons I learned: to try not to be so rigid. Yes, some things (like my new sketchbook) are sacred, but if you let go of those chains, new and wonderful things can happen. Those things you hold so dear cannot change and grow and expand unless you loosen your grip on them a little. In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, YOU WILL ALWAYS BE DISAPPOINTED. Instead, just go with it, just ACCEPT it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.”

You can purchase prints of these delightful illustrations here. (via)

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Designer Creates a Different Silhouette of His Daughter Every Week

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Graphic Design can often get the bad rap of lacking soul or substance.  Designer Brent Holloman, however, created a series with heart.  When his daughter was born in 2012 he decided to create a new silhouette of her each week.  Ranging from illustration to sculpture, each week brings a profile of his little girl.  These are a sampling of the many pieces he created.  Holloman comments on the series:

” With the arrival of our first baby girl there is one thing I hear all the time… “They grow up so fast.” So I decided to start a project where I can mark the stages of her growth by doing a silhouette of her each week for her first year (or as long as I can keep it going).”

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