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Cradle of Mankind – The Tribes of Ethopia & The birthplace of Homo Sapiens

Cradle of Mankind is the newest series by Canadian-born photographer, Joey L. Shot in Ethiopia’s Omo Valley, and featuring portraits of the various tribes that inhabit the area. The photographs are a deeply moving, visual homage to the tribal peoples of Ethiopia, the birthplace of Homo sapiens.

The photographs from Cradle of Mankind, along with Joey L.’s documentary film, Faces of a Vanishing World (watch the trailer after the jump)– which first aired on Ovation TV in September 2010, chronicle the artist’s deep interest in Ethiopia, and the rapid transition of it’s oldest cultures. During his time in the country, Joey L. lived with various tribes in the region, learning the different customs of each while capturing individual portraits. Though these tribes may seem untouched by time, they are in fact in constant danger of disappearing forever. The artist states in a 2010 NPR interview that he is interested in anthropology and likes photographing different cultures, “but the ones I’ve been paying attention to lately are the, I suppose what you’d call vanishing ones, … the cultures that are on the verge of extinction, tribes that are threatened by progress and losing their language and losing their ways of life that they’ve sustained for thousands of years.”

See a selection of Cradle Of Mankind from June 21st-August 4th 2012 at Stephen Cohen Gallery in Los Angeles

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Dea Lellis

São Paulo based Dea Lellis’ graphic paintings are steeped in mythology as well as references to movies, terror, music, and fashion.

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Jena Buckwell

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Photographer Jena Buckwell’s greatest goal in life is to never be bored. Producing beautiful photography is one of the many ways she keeps herself busy. This is her latest series of surrealist portraiture of those she holds dearest. This New York native also does design and  illustration that you can check out on her daily blog.

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Mark Dorf’s Beautiful Juxtapositions Of Technology And Nature

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Photographer Mark Dorf‘s photoseries //_Path is an exploration of how technology and encroaching singularity affect our relationship and place in the natural world. The Brooklyn-based artist notes “…there is barely a single situation that is not influenced by digital technology and communication through the World Wide Web – the Internet and digital technology has been integrated into nearly every part of our lives and will only continue to become more and more present in our daily routines.”

//_Path seeks to explore this integration in its most visual form; combining bucolic and lush photography with images from collage, digital photographs and renderings, and early 3D scanning techniques. These symbolically-loaded, technologically-sourced alterations serve to represent a “…synthetic form to contrast against the landscape in which they are manifested; a comparison of language.”

Though Dorf is certainly not the only artist working with juxtapositions of technology and the natural world, his work specifically calls attention to the psychological and sociological damage our dependence on the tools we depend on, which once served us and now control us. Acknowledging that this dilemma too is human nature, Dorf seems to call for a combination of understanding: an existence both within the frameworks of our digital lives, and within our natural environment. Dorf explains, “It is no longer about logging on or off, but rather living within and creating harmony with the realms and constructs of the internet for our newest generation of inhabitants.” 

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Delta- From Graffiti To Architecture

It’s always interesting to see what graffiti writers do in the fine art world. Some keep rehashing the same work on canvas, losing all of the power that energized the work by having it in the streets. However some artists such as the legendary Dutch graffiti artist Delta take what they’ve learned through their years of painting letterforms and create amazing new works that re-imagine architecture, space, installation and painting. Wondering what Delta’s graffiti looked like back in the day? Click the read more button and check out the last image.

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Jose Davila’s Skeletal Architecture

Jose Davila lives and works in Guadalajara, Mexico. His large installations are “…fueled by the interest in the relation between place and fiction, space and temporality under architecture…” Davila accomplishes this with wood and metal objects that outline a room with a skeletal structure. Another series features colorful mobiles that constantly shift as they hover above the ground. His formations define their environment as they investigate form and color.(via)

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MINALE-MAEDA’s Inside Out Furniture And Lego Buffet

Minale-Maeda’s Inside Out Furniture series is designed specifically to be downloadable in order to reduce enviornmental issues related to transport, costs of stockkeeping, and explore collaborative design and distribution. The concept was to turn pieces inside out to make construction simple, while brackets and structural details become distinctive and attractive features. The connections are 3D printed to suit various sizes of wood, and the crafting is minimal requiring only cutting to length and drilling. Another interesting project by the collaborative duo is the Lego Buffet, a buffet table gorgeously made entirely out of you guessed it, Legos! See more images after the jump!

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Mitch Griffiths’ Paintings Mix Old Master Technique With Contemporary Culture

British artist Mitch Griffiths‘ work is inspired by the light and the composition of the Old Masters, but his context and content depict issues that concern modern culture. In his work, Griffiths addresses the disposable nature of contemporary culture by immortalizing this transience with the perceived permanence of the painting medium. His figurative portraits are dark and foreboding and often turbulent. The drama depicted in his paintings, though contemporary, feels universal, historical, and personal. Though many of his images resonate with religious iconography, the “symbolism reflects a modern quest for redemption from the overriding self-obsession and consumerism of contemporary society, with its vanity and greed, addictions and needless suffering.”

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