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Jordi Ferreiro’s Workshops For Kids

Jordi Ferreiro

Yayoi Kusama homage

Jordi Ferreiro

Andy Warhol homage

Spanish designer Jordi Ferreiro takes on a role often overlooked in the creative industry when he organizes these art workshop for kids. Though I’m definitely not qualified to make any astute comments on arts education in the American school system, it’d be nice if there was umm… more of it. It’s interesting though, to see the sort of primitive forms and ideas presented in the children’s artworks and think “Wow, the stuff made by (enter currently hip artist’s name who makes drawings that look like kids made them) totally looks like this!”. Maybe the form is completely mastered but not the thoughts behind it because the output of a child’s imagination is fresh. We’re just all jaded and hungry for irony.

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B/D’s Best of 2010- Yellena James

Allusion

Allusion

Yellena James uses pen and ink to create truly exquisite forms. What starts out as a single shape or line blossoms into magnificent mushroom-jellyfish hybrids, feeding my affinity for all things under the sea! Her artwork has been so perfectly described as “colorful arrangements of organic shapes and tangled lines (which) are at once floral and alien, organic and sci-fi, crafty and fantastic.” With each piece she tries to “create an intimate world that posesses its own ethos and its own emotional range.”

She’s done illustration work for clients such as Anthropologie and Nike, and her work has appeared in numerous art and design resources and publications like Vogue Australia and Giant Robot.

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The Happiest Street Art In The World

Who says street art has to be rough and tough? The good folks over at Eyebombing have made it their mission to spread the joyous and fun message of putting googly eyes on everyday objects and to bring smiles to random peoples faces. You can join their mission of laughter and joy by getting your own googly eye stickers and discovering the faces that start to emerge out of the mundane architecture that we pass by everyday.

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Liu Di’s Massive Photoshopped Animals Bring Attention To Beijing’s Urban Ruins

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On a crowded bus ride in Beijing, Chinese artist Liu Di noticed his surroundings. “Looking out at the decrepit housing blocks”, he said, “I had a vague but strong feeling that there was something missing between the ground and the sky.” It was then that he had the idea for his 2008 series, Animal Regulation, an almost cinematic display of enlarged animals sitting amongst the ‘urban ruins’ of the city of Beijing. Using photoshop, he seamlessly embedded these wild, large animals into Beijing’s forgotten and depleted back streets, construction sites and tenement courtyards.

With the addition of the gigantic,exotic animals, Di not only tries to fill the void that he notices as he travels through the city, but most importantly, he attempts to draw attention to these spaces in a big and scandalous way. We cannot  help but notice ‘the big panda in the room’, and that, I think, is the kind of reaction the artist is looking for. The metaphorical animal living amongst the city of Beijing alludes to deeper issues here–the void is filled with an unwanted visitor and in order for it to go away something must change.

Di’s political undertones cannot be missed.

“Between nature and human society, between the material world and the intellect, between obedience to and violation of the laws of nature. It is only when our preconceptions are jolted that we wake up and truly see.”

These photographs are part of Barbara Pollack’s My Generation, an exhibition that acts as the first in the U.S  to focus solely on the new post-Mao generation of dissident Chinese artists. The catalogue includes works by Sun Xun, Lu Yang, Ai Wei Wei’s former assistant, Zhao  Zhao and many more. The show is currently being co-presented in two venues simultaneously through a unique collaboration between Tampa Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in St.Petersburg, FL. My Generation will be on view until September 28th, 2014.

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Jimmie Durham

JimmieDurham

Jimmie Durham’s latest exhibition, “Obsidian,” explores the poetics of the black volcanic glass material, once favored by Mesoamerican cultures in shamanic rites and the creation of mirrors. Above is “The Doorman,” fashioned after Texcatlipoca, meaning “smoking mirror,” an Aztec deity represented by his characteristic black obsidian mirror. And creating the world. I love these contemporary-ancient new magic sculptures. If you’re in Mexico, Durham’s show is up until February 6th at Kurimanzutto.

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Photographs That Borrow From History To Critique Sexual Politics

Genevieve Blais - PhotographyGenevieve Blais - PhotographyGenevieve Blais - Photography

Genevieve Blais, a photographer based in Toronto, borrows imagery from classic art history paintings to unpack sexual politics relative to today’s contemporary palate.

Of her intention, Blais states, “The aesthetic/topical dissonance aims to elicit an uneasy response in order to subvert the implicit authority and sanctity of the icon.”

The result confronts and critiques art culture by sitting in an uneasy space between not only imagery, but also mediums– cameras and brushes, forcing us to clearly see the model as the true determinant– a staged powerful variant that has been with us since Caravaggio’s rule, humanizing the myth.

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Ross Racine

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I was quite surprised when I found out the work of Canadian artist Ross Racine was completely hand-drawn. While some compositions are more realistic than others, all of them could pass fairly easily as documentary aerial photography of yesteryear, perhaps taken from government planes after the great post-war suburban explosion. Some of his drawings are minimal, some much more complexly textured; all present an interesting fictional view of suburban and rural America.

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Luzinterruptus’ Melbourne Installation Of Thousands of Books and LEDs

“Literature vs. Traffic”:

 

To the other side of the world we went, going from the sunny summer in Madrid to a mild and rainy winter, with the romantic intention of converting the modern and somewhat cold architecture of Federation Square, into a cozy, human and intimate space, which encouraged reading and tranquility.

 

So the folks at Milan-based collective Luzinterruptus (previously) went down to Melbourne and did their thing with lights (if you don’t know by now, they’ve put on some really ill installations using all sorts of LED lights), except this time they used thousands of books to “block traffic” in “a symbolic gesture in which literature took control of the streets and became the conquerer of the public space”. The pages seem to flow into one another as a cohesive whole and the LEDs add some sort of mystical dimension to the whole thing. I love the shots of people just swimming in the installation, which was up for a whole month. The positive message promoting literacy is just frosting on the cake. Click the jump to see more of what went down. (via)

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