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Miraculously Ruined Polaroids Made With A Broken Vintage Camera

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For Ruined Polaroids, William Miller uses a broken polaroid SX-70 that he stumbled upon at a yard sale; quickly discovering that its decades-old gears mangled the film and transformed the exposure, the artist submitted the the whims of the photographic relic, allowing it to form blurred and unpredictably patterned abstractions from his shots.

Within the “ruined” images, we find a surprising emotionality, with the faulty chemical process producing expressionistic renderings of a less literal kind of photographic memory. Cataloging the accidentally lovely results of mechanical happenstance, each shot enters a richly moody realm evocative of the work of mid-century abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock or Mark Rothko. As the spastic movements of gears, chemicals, and fingers become the subject of the work, the artistic process overrides a predetermined result. Rather than serving as a record of a particular instant, Ruined Polaroids poignantly archives the accidental deterioration of a camera past its time.

Ultimately, the conceptual work also serves to refute contemporary understanding of the photograph. In her seminal work On Photography, published in 1977 at the height of polaroid popularity, Susan Sontag discusses the illusion of a photographic truth, theorizing that the photographer, unlike all other artists, is capable of disguising subjectivity for objective fact. Miller’s work expertly challenges this assumed power of the photographic medium, acutely presenting each image as evidence of its failures. The immediacy of the polaroid image only accelerates this process; printed instantly and held against some imagined reality, the bleeding lights and darks veer jarringly from what we expect from the camera. Take a look. (via Lost at E Minor and This Is Paper)

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Bram Vanhaeren

oBright colors, playful compositions, clever type and some mad drawing skills are what makes Belgium digital artist & illustrator Bram Vanhaeren’s work so inviting. Bram has an impressive list of publications under his belt and he is also the mastermind behind Wallpaper.org; a forum for bringing artists together through the format of desktop wallpaper… give it a look!

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Figurative Sculpture Made With Legos- Indoors and On the Street

 

These are real legos. Nathan Sawaya works with the popular toy to create large-scale figurative sculpture. Legos’ shatter-prone tendencies and the plastic material involved lend a fractured, modern quality to these. The cold geometry involved in each sculpture sets up a nice opportunity for reflection, and Sawaya’s emotional posing of the figures spurs even further questioning.

But the sculptures  work just as well when taken at face value: legos were, and are a lot of fun to play with.

Lately, Sawaya’s been placing 15-inch “Hugmen” in various public spaces (see above), adding a little love to the daily grind. Click past the jump for more lego sculpture.

Photos courtesy of the artist and Erica Ann.

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Chris Little

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Chris Little is a photographer and a film maker. His images are grainy and have a washed out tone, but this makes them rather enticing. His subject matter varies, everything from portraits, to ladies drenching themselves in milk, to drag racing motor sports. I dig it.

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James Franco’s Name Brand Celebrity Status Continues To Result In Gallery Shows

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A couple of weeks ago, we posted James Franco’s self-portraiture imitating Cindy Sherman’s 1970s student project photographs in which she impersonates the roles of iconic women in film; these photographs are on view at PACE Gallery until May 3. A testament to the receptiveness of audiences to Franco’s work, this post performed quite well. Franco has now imitated another artist for work to be displayed at PACE, following the Cindy Sherman imitations, but this time, without (yet) giving proper credit.

In 2011, Christopher Schulz self-published a 32-page book of Seth Rogen fan art; Franco’s upcoming gallery show features nude paintings of Rogen, some that appear to be directly based on (read: copied from) Schulz’s portraits. ArtNet notes that this new work has not been very warmly received by the internet; Huffington Post condemns Franco for “continuing to engage in what some view as blatant homophobia, because comedy,” Dlisted calls Franco a “douchier Shia LaDouche,” and A.V. Club claims the paintings are plagiarism.

At this point, James Franco has delved into many different worlds: academia (once a graduate student in 4 programs at the same time), soap opera, television, and film acting, film-making, fiction and pseudo-academic writing, and performance art. I try not to be annoyed by people, especially artists of all stripes, but James Franco is one person I can barely tolerate at this point. Aside from playing the role of Alien in “Spring Breakers,” I can’t really get on board with anything he is pursuing (especially the “critical” essays he writes for Vice wherein he makes obvious arguments that lack depth). I don’t know what to think about him, and I’m beginning to feel jaded with his pursuits. No one seems to know if Franco takes himself seriously, or if anyone should. Some have even speculated that his recent, creepy propositioning of a minor was performance art, or a marketing ploy for his latest film.

In 2010, Sam Anderson, writing for New York Magazine, conducts a critical investigation into Franco’s life, exploring his Hollywood career as performance art and asking a few questions that are central and just as pertinent to our current experience of Franco in 2014:

(1) Can James Franco possibly be for real?

(2) If he is, then—just logistically—how is all this possible?

(3) And perhaps the biggest mystery of all: Why is Franco doing it? Are his motives honest or dishonest? Neurotic or healthy? Arrogant or humble? Ironic or sincere? Naïve or sophisticated? Should we reward him with our attention or punish him with our contempt? Is he genuinely trying to improve himself or is he just messing with us—using celebrity itself as the raw material for some kind of public prank?

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Anya Gallaccio’s 10,000 Dying Roses

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Anya Gallaccio‘s installation Red on Green may leave elicit a different reaction depending on when you catch the show.  Gallaccio plucked the heads of 10,000 roses and arranged them into large neat rectangle.  At first the installation may resemble a grand romantic gesture.  However, Gallaccio’s interest is piqued by what the installation becomes.  In a way Red on Green turns into a type of natural performance as the field of red shifts to brown.  She utilizes the loaded symbol of the rose as a starting point for investigating the natural processes of death and decay.

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Lightning Strikes: Artist Uses Electricity To Create Captivating Portraits

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Using up to 30,000 volts of electricity, artist Dries Ketels tries to capture a quality usually unseen in most portraits. His latest series, called Our Souls Captured in the Electromagnetic Field is an exploration of the human condition. He says by using a unique combination of different chemicals, painting materials and electricity, he is able to capture something more about his subjects. He wants to go deeper into their psyche, and to reveal something about people that is usually unseen. In the process he has come up with some pretty striking images.

He raises some pretty interesting questions while trying to reveal the working of our inner selves:

What is this soul or this character of an individual other than a bunch of electromagnetic interactions in the brain of that individual? What is the most important thing that a portrait should grasp? Are our actions, that define us as a human being, more than electromagnetic interactions? (Dries Ketels)

Ketels also makes the connection in his images between the patterns formed from the lightning and veins in the body, or synapses in the brain. He links the macro-world to the micro-world; the external universe to our internal one. The young artist is interested in new, exciting and innovative methods and ideas:

For a few of my series around realism I leave the traditional realism behind and present the reality of realism. One of the most important attitudes that helped me developing a relaity of realism and becoming what I am is the simple act of going left when everybody else is going right. It’s the only way to discover the new and push the boundaries forward. (Source)

To see more of his boundary pushing art, see here.

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Chasing Ice- The One Documentary Film Everyone Must Watch!

Last night I had the pleasure of watching one of the most incredible documentaries I’ve ever seen. It was simultaneously beautiful and heartbreaking. If there is only one movie you see before the end of the year make sure it’s Chasing Ice. After you watch it find out how you can host a screening of the film locally and spread this story.

“In the spring of 2005, acclaimed environmental photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment for National Geographic: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earth’s changing climate. Even with a scientific upbringing, Balog had been a skeptic about climate change. But that first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk.

Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers.

As the debate polarizes America and the intensity of natural disasters ramps up globally, Balog finds himself at the end of his tether. Battling untested technology in subzero conditions, he comes face to face with his own mortality. It takes years for Balog to see the fruits of his labor. His hauntingly beautiful videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate. Chasing Ice depicts a photographer trying to deliver evidence and hope to our carbon-powered planet.”

See more of Jame’s breathtaking photographs of glaciers after the jump.

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