Get Social:

Genevieve Lawrence

throwyourface

Is Genevieve Lawrence a Theosophic occultist?  Using secret, mystical insight to call home the star-walkers who built the multidimensional Pyramids?  Is she conjuring devious spells with strange hieroglyphs?  Based in abnormal, impious, and non-Euclidean geometry, the pictures come together around glowing cubes and patterned triangles.  This feels like the same dark magic on the one dollar bill or the Egyptian Book of the Dead.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Adam Baz

Adam Baz

Whimsical mixed media work from west coaster Adam Baz. His mystical drawings unfold with simple yet refined details and bursts of color. Also reminds me a little bit of of Zachary Rossman’s work, which is definitely a good thing.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Goodbye, Fearless Intern Corinna Loo!

photo

Thankfully, we didn’t trick fearless intern Miss Corinna Nicole Loo into thinking that the photo above we took of her, hard at work in the B/D offices, was for anything other than public consumption. (Apologies on tricking you for your ‘goodbye post’, Greg.) And yet, the smiles are all real my friends! Corinna can attest to the fact that slaving away night and day for the greater good of Beautiful/Decay is quite fun! During her stay here, she’s done some great design work, blog posts (you can view her ouevre, as ze French say, here), humorous anecdotes about her two kitties (wearing sombreros) and of course titillating data entry….well, maybe that wasn’t so titillating for her, but, nonetheless! Thank you for all your hard work and contributions to the B/D team, we know you will have a great impact both at UCLA and the design world….so, the start of another school year will wrest you from our firmly clenched claws, Miss Loo, but of course we hope you will return to us again soon. Some of Corinna’s personal work after the jump!

Currently Trending

Colorblind Photographer Ray Collins Captures The Beauty And Drama Of Water

Ray Collins - water photography Ray Collins - water photography Ray Collins - water photography

Ray Collins sees waves and water in a way that most people don’t. Luckily for us he also captures it with his camera. Collins acquired his first camera in 2007 and seems to have stayed in the water with it ever since, focused on capturing all of the different forms of water. Initially he wanted to take snaps of his surfer friends in his native Australia catching rides and enjoying barrels, but instead was enticed by the blue liquid under their boards.

Collins, who is actually colorblind, is able to focus on the patterns and light play in the waves, and pays special attention to the shapes they make against the sky. His unique perspective shows off the grandness and drama of the seascapes. Normal splashes of water are seen instead as incredible peaks on mountains. The front of a wave turns into a deep canyon which sinks to unseen depths. Collins manages to capture the translucency, strength, fluidity, and the unrelenting force of water all at the same time.

His unique style has won him some hefty accolades in just a few years, including 1st Place for ‘Australian Surf Photo of the Year‘ (2015), he was a finalist in the ‘Smithsonian – Annual Photo Contest’ (2015), and also was the winner for the ‘American Aperture Awards’ – Landscape/Seascape/Nature (2015). He has shot campaigns for Nikon, United Airlines, Qantas and National Geographic, and has a new book out called Found At Sea, which a collection of some of his favorite photographs.

You can also see his daily photos on Instagram.

Currently Trending

You Plus Us. Join us on Google Plus

Google Plus Beautiful Decay

Stay seamlessly updated by following us on Google Plus. We’ll be posting our articles on art, design, culture and events while adding exclusive G+ content. Follow us on Google Plus and get your daily art and design fixed delivered to your stream.

 

Currently Trending

3D Digital Creatures Designed To Repulse And Intrigue

The Six and Five studio - Sculpture 4 The Six and Five studio - Sculpture 1 The Six and Five studio - Sculpture 5 The Six and Five studio - Sculpture 1=2

Colorful, textured creatures imagined by designers Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini from The Six and Five Studio. The series called “Morbo” is a rendering of 3D printing and digital coloring. The result is bluffing. Easily mistaken for real existing sculptures or hyperrealistic paintings, the designers have had to explain themselves a lot about the disturbing aspect of their work.

Pushing the limits of art and design, the Argentinian duo Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini like to explore the three dimensional world. Stranded on the beach after an apocalyptic episode, the creatures are found as they are presented to us. Raw, shapeless and twisted by the centrifugal force of nature, they mix elements which has nothing to do with each other. Hair, coral, gelatinous paste, plastic, porcelain and more are harmonized in objects that, in the end, make sense to the eye.

At first glance, the creatures seem ugly. Part of it is due to the fact that we can envision a living hairy animal coming out of it. Once the process of creation is understood, the look on it changes. The designers are interested in that shift. From unpleasant to attractive, our curiosity grows as we discover that these fantasy ‘things’ do not really exist. Leaving us wondering if beauty is better off restrained within our minds instead of being exposed out there. (via booooooom)

Currently Trending

Beautiful/Decay Is Santa Approved!

This holiday season give the gift of creativity with a year long subscription to Beautiful/Decay. Your loved ones will not only will get a limited edition art print with each book, but they will also receive a beautifully designed, hand numbered book, chock full of inspirational art from the best creative minds.

Currently Trending

Martin Wittfooth’s Post-Apocalyptic Paintings Of Animals In A Desolate World

Martin Wittfooth - paintings Martin Wittfooth - paintingsMartin Wittfooth - paintingsMartin Wittfooth - paintings

capitoline_web

The dark paintings of Martin Wittfooth depict a frightening dystopia that could be our reality if we are not careful. The world he shows us is a grim and desolate one, void of humans, but full of casualties that our species could easily cause. We see a world of animals suffering from our actions and learning to adapt to their new environment for survival. His paintings are a stark reminder of what could happen if we aren’t aware of, and don’t cease the damage we are causing.

Wolves creep around in a burning wasteland, probably looking for food to eat, or some substance somewhere. Bears tip over old water jugs, or some sort of relic from a time past. Tigers are sprawled out over the hood of a rusty car, surrounded by flowers sprouting out of the trunk. The beak of an albatross is stuffed full of trash, the bird unaware that his chosen items are harmful, and not healthy. The sight of these animals that we (should) cherish trying to survive in an undesirable place should bring out the emotions in us that Wittfooth wants.

Everywhere and at all times, we’ve been busy making things in our present for the simple purpose of communicating something, and thus sending messages into our future. What a peculiar habit. We’re the only species inhabiting this planet that routinely behaves this way, and there’s something really beautiful and profound about that. (Source)

His paintings full of the consequences of climate change, over use, excess pollution and unnecessary producing and consumption may seem dramatic, but are actually just a glimpse into a future that could happen, sooner than we think. Wittfooth paints with a sense of urgency; with a need to tell people things could be getting quite bad, quite quickly. He goes on:

I often think about what the psychedelic thinker Terence McKenna called “The Archaic Revival”: a yearning to look into the past to see meaning, connection, the sacred, looking back at us. I need those reminders sometimes, when the current state of human affairs seems dire and in need of a new perspective. (Source)

Currently Trending