Get Social:

Patrick Nagel

1309 Patrick Nagel was  a Los Angeles based artists whose work strongly resembles that of the japanese woodblock and art deco styles.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jaye Moon’s Evovled Diorama Sculpture

Interesting series of sculpture from Brooklyn artist Jaye Moon. The boxes almost look like evolved versions of those dioramas you had to make in elementary school to depict scenes from some novel you had to read for class. Except whatever scenes these are meant to reproduce are so much more cerebral. Clean, almost marble-like materials mingle with glowing elements of subdued color to make you wonder. I Could stare at these for a long time coming up with my own scenarios. See more of the artist’s box work after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Rob Matthews

Rob Matthews is an east coast designer (I’ve noticed a lot of good work coming from Minneapolis!) with a penchant for the ironic. His “Wikipedia” project takes articles from Wiki’s Wikipedia’s featured articles. Other projects include: T-shirts and posters that wrap around your head to make you become his friend ‘Trevor Burks’ (who he misses), and turning drawings into photographs which is kind of like the opposite of what people are used to when they’re first practicing art.

Edit: Friend & video artist Party Food (Joe) has sent me a map to show me where MPLS is, thank you. If you are like me, geographically challenged, please refer to this image.

Currently Trending

Mark McCloud, The World’s Leading Collector Of LSD ‘Blotter’

Mark_McCloud_LSD_beautiful_decay_02

Mark_McCloud_LSD_beautiful_decay_08

Mark_McCloud_LSD_beautiful_decay_05

Mark_McCloud_LSD_beautiful_decay_01

At 13 Mark Cloud tried acid in Santa Barbara, an experience that merited the epic summation: “I was blind, but then I could see.”

It wasn’t until then, around 1968, that acid imagery became popular and McCloud started collecting and cataloguing the many acid stamps he encountered.

“At first I was keeping them in the freezer, which was a problem because I kept eating them,” McCloud explained to VICE, “but then the Albert Hofmann acid came out, and then I thought, Fuck, I’m framing this. That’s when I realized, Hey, if I try to swallow this I’ll choke on the frame.”

Today, Mark McCloud is the world’s leading collector of “Blotter Art” (the fancy way of saying that he collects the small, stamp-like papers that used to transport acid, or LSD). McCloud’s collection, one that is bigger and more varied that those owned by the FBI and DEA, is now hanging in his Victorian home in San Francisco- a home turned museum that you should definitely visit!

Currently Trending

PNTS

PNTS Graphic Design

PNTS, a graphic design studio based in France has some nice works on their portfolio site.

Currently Trending

Sergey Sbss

stereo-89.white_inner_pack.poster_by_Sbss

Sergey Sbss is a Moscow based graphic artist and designer. Sergey applies his style through collaborations with numerous industries, and is intent on furthering such collaborations in order to experiment with varied and unexpected surfaces.

Currently Trending

Johnson Tsang Sculpts Bulbous And Bizarre Babies That Melt Infancy With Adulthood

Johnson Tsang - Sculpture Johnson Tsang - Sculpture Johnson Tsang - Sculpture Johnson Tsang - Sculpture

In a collection called Inner Child, Hong Kong-based artist Johnson Tsang has sculpted bulbous, porcelain-skinned babies with a surrealist twist. With their enlarged heads, bright eyes, and wrinkled faces, they are painstakingly detailed to capture their emotions. From teary-eyed angst to pouting petulance, they seem to behave like normal infants, but each one is infused with elements of the absurd; one baby laughs manically while sitting on a gilded throne inside a birdcage, and another, dressed in a suit, looks pensive while a fish leaps into his head. Whereas babies are ordinarily known for their heart-melting cuteness, Tsang’s sculptural offspring almost repel us with their bizarre conflations of infancy and adulthood.

Inner Child was displayed last month at K+ Curatorial Space in Singapore. In the press release for the show, Tsang explains the playful motivations behind his sculptures:

“Every adult has an inner child deep inside our soul. It is what keeps us curious, urges us to pursue happiness . . . and above all, gives us courage to embrace our truest selves.” (Source)

Tsang’s work, then, is an observation of the youthful drives that persist within all of us. Because age is often viewed as a linear process—from innocence and emotional expression to maturity and stoic intellect—“childish” traits or behaviors in an adult context may seem odd or even off-putting. Tsang wants us to enjoy his sculptures, however, and to reflect on our own inner children—then maybe we can accept and explore those feelings of unbridled glee, frustration, need, and discontent. After all, these are feelings we will experience again to that “unsophisticated,” childlike degree; as Tsang states humorously, “some day, we will all be old enough to start acting like kids again.” (Source)

Visit Tsang’s website to see more of his work, and click here for a fascinating making-of video. (Via The Creators Project)

Currently Trending

Klari Reis Exploits Science And Chemistry To Create Striking Petri Dish Paintings

Fashionista Lace

Fashionista Lace

Green Electricity

Green Electricity

Ring Around Roses

Ring Around Roses

Green Electricity

Green Electricity

San Fransisco based chemist/artist Klari Reis hand paints a plexiglass petri dish every day in her latest project A Daily Dish. But it is not just superficial, decorative painting, Reis fills the actual form with different layers of epoxy polymers pigmented with oils, acrylics, powders, and dyes. Manipulating the transparency, opacity, color intensity, size and forms of the different elements, she produces mini abstract ‘paintings’. They are colorful, playful and optimistic-looking examples of how beautifully science and art can exist as one and the same.

And she doesn’t only make paintings within the individual dishes, but she also arranges her creations into impressive large scale wall installations. Using the color of the dishes to dictate her layout, Reis’ petri dish installations are a subtle and poetic reminder of how aesthetically pleasing the elements can be. Living next to many life science companies in San Fransisco, she allows this to benefit her work.

[She] takes advantage of this proximity to collaborate with local biomedical companies and thus receives inspiration from the cutting edge of biological techniques and discoveries; this context grounds her artwork and lets her authoritatively explore the increasingly fuzzy line between the technological and the natural. (Source)

Reis has created so many different petri dish paintings, make sure you check out all of them on her website, complete with amusing titles such as Companion Planting, Birthday Surprise, Interconnected Planetary March, Backstroke Drills and Emotion Explosion. Not only do they sound like the names of paint samples, but also a wonderfully experimental high school science experiment.

Currently Trending