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Amy Ross

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Amy Ross, as she herself states, is quite interested in the idea of artists as “mad scientists”. She posts the question, “What would happen if the DNA sequence of a plant or mushroom were spliced with that of an animal?“. As she tries answering this question herself and to the viewers, her latest works titled, “Brother Wolf” addresses just that.

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Barry Stone

Barry Stone keeps things simple and precise with geometric abstract collages. Barry also has some video work on his site that’s worth a peak.

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Interactive Sculpture That Makes Charcoal Drawings

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Artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski in a way treats her sculpture like a living creature.  The piece titled (or maybe named) ADA is a large ball inflated with helium and covered in charcoal pegs.  Visitors are encouraged to interact, even play with the ball thus leaving marks on the walls, floor, and ceiling of the room.  The artist considers the piece not only a sculpture, but really a self-creating artwork.  ADA’s shape even resembles a cell or virus emphasizing the idea of the sculpture creating on its own (with some help from visitors, of course).

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Ben Skinner’s Message In An Artwork

 

Vancouver based Ben Skinner’s text based work is inspired by hand made folk objects, nostalgia, the banal, and the inherent history in old objects.

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Todd Schorr

L_tschorr_apeworship Todd Schorr has a new exhibit called “Designed for Extinction” at the Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art & Design.

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Japanese Artist Arrested for Distributing 3D Model Of Her Vagina

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On Saturday, Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi was arrested for the crime of distributing indecent material. And what did she distribute, exactly? Digital data that represents 3D modeling information of her vagina. After raising around $10,000 via her crowd-sourcing campaign, Igarashi was able to complete the construction of her planned vaginal-shaped kayak. As part of the campaign, donors were promised the digital file from which Igarashi was able to complete her design – it is for sending these files that Igarashi was arrested, and faces up to two years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000. If you thought sexist double standards were beyond apparent here in the States, then let me direct you to Japan’s incredible double standards, most strongly evidenced by the celebration of penises in an annual penis festival and their stance on most international pornography standards. Known by the pseudonym rokudenashi-ko ( “good-for-nothing kid”), 42-year-old Igarashi began working with 3D models of her vagina as a response to the shame and ignorance she felt about her own genitalia.

From her web site: “I make art pieces with my vagina, which I would rather call Manko(MK). I thought it was just funny to decorate my vagina and make into a diorama, but I was very surprised to see how upset people get when they see my works or even hear me say the word Manko. Even when a TV station asked me to be on their show, they wouldn’t dare let me say DECO-MAN because “MAN” is from the taboo word “Manko”. Why did I start making these kind of art pieces? It’s because I had never seen the vagina of others and I was too self-conscious of mine. I did not know what a vagina should look like at the same time, so I thought mine was abnormal. Manko and vagina, have been such a taboo in Japanese society. Penis, on the other hand, has been used in illustrations and has become a part of pop culture. But vagina has never been so cute. Vagina has been thought to be obscene because its been overly hidden; although it is just a part of a woman’s body.”

There is a petition circulating advocating for Igarashi’s release that has already collected almost 19,000 signatures. You can watch her crowd-sourcing campaign video here. (via guardian and spoon & tamago)

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Robert Larson Turns The Ugly & Destructive Act Of Smoking Cigarettes Into Something Unexpectedly Beautiful

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Robert Larson uses discarded cigarettes packaging, matchbooks, and rolling papers to create his compositions. Somewhat reminiscent of Tom Fruin’s drug baggies, the artist creates abstract patterns from smoking paraphernalia, and turns the ugly and destructive act of smoking into something unexpectedly beautiful.

Larson finds the materials by scavenging neighbourhoods in Santa Cruz, where he lives and works. There’s an interesting play between personal and impersonal in his work. The consistent grid of the items, be it shiny packaging or used matches, gives a sense of the systemic nature of urban life, while their individual treatment – worn by weather or use – sustains a sense of individual experience.

Cigarettes are rarely if ever associated with beauty, at least in our moment. Certainly in the past they were glamourized, but happily, people are beginning to see quite clearly their highly detrimental effect. Still, they maintain a heavy presence, and it’s exciting to see something positive come out of a predominantly negative thing. Larson’s compositions are surprisingly colourful and dynamic. He has a good eye for placement, as in the Marlboro packaging where he distributes the various tones of grey-brown wear to radiate outwards from the middle of the work. His pieces are mostly quite large, reaching over six feet. It makes me wonder how long it would take him to collect his materials, which could give him some understanding of the smoking population of each neighbourhood he collects from.

Images courtesy of CES Gallery

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Yellena James

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Yellena James uses pen and ink to create truly exquisite forms. What starts out as a single shape or line blossoms into magnificent mushroom-jellyfish hybrids, feeding my affinity for all things under the sea! Her artwork has been so perfectly described as “colorful arrangements of organic shapes and tangled lines (which) are at once floral and alien, organic and sci-fi, crafty and fantastic.” With each piece she tries to “create an intimate world that posesses its own ethos and its own emotional range.”

 

She’s done illustration work for clients such as Anthropologie and Nike, and her work has appeared in numerous art and design resources and publications like Vogue Australia and Giant Robot.

 

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