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TYLER VIPOND Turns 2D To 3D

Londoner Tyler Vipond’s work plays mostly with space and depth created out of formerly 2D surfaces. Bridging the space between sculpture and painting, his work leaves you with a feeling of tension and intricacy while still feeling almost effortless. I particularly love his series “A Collapse” whose pieces are almost reminiscent of deconstructed origami.

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Rodrigo Arteaga Merges Science And Art With His Handsome Maps Created With Bacteria

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There are many kinds of maps to help find our way in this world. Political, road, and topographic maps may be familiar, but in Chilean artist Rodrigo Arteaga’s hands, maps are made by and of cultivated fungi. Meticulously grown and preserved, Arteaga’s maps are simultaneously science lesson and aesthetic object.

“Convergence” is a mapamundi (map of the world); an installation composed of filamentary fungi in glass containers. The propagation these fungi propagated represented the surface of the earth. The other components of the work were elements that evidence the research process: photocopies of mycology books, pencil drawings that imitate the growth of fungi, sketches, photographs, and Petri dishes with laboratory tests.

A second project, “Atlas de Chile Regionalizado,” consists of 15 glass containers in which different types of filamentary fungi represent each one of the 15 regions of Chile. The living organic matter of the fungi is delimited and cut in the shape of each region, then preserved under resin.

These interdisciplinary works involve people from interdisciplinary areas of thought. Their beauty is in the relationship between art and science; order and chaos.

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Rye Rye

Great video with M.I.A. protege Rye Rye by our friends at Coolhunting.com.  This video visits the rising star in the studio working on her yet as unreleased album and at a WWD Daily photo shoot. The 18-year-old Baltimore native shares the story of how she came up, a few dance moves and what she likes to rap about.

It’s amazing how kids that are still in highschool are making such big waves w/out major record labels. You can thank the internet for that!

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The Tiniest Landscapes Painted On Miniature Pieces Of Food

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For the Turkish artist Hasan Kale, the tiniest morsel of food inspires visions of sweeping landscapes. Using his finger as a palate, he adorns almonds, M&Ms, and the most translucent layers of an onion with astonishing renderings of his native Istanbul. Where most landscapes take up entire museum walls, commanding attention with their sheer immensity, Kale’s work does the opposite. In these miraculous works of macro painting, the infinite nature of the earth, sea, and sky collides with the impossibly minuscule, heightening the preciousness of the Turkish terrain.

Here, snack foods become as wondrous as great feats of nature and man. On thin slice of banana, a storm rages, its brushstrokes transforming the very texture of the fruit into that of a saturated canvas. On the inner flesh of an almond, he imagines the legendary baroque architecture of the Nusretiye Mosque. The iconic building becomes vertically stretched as in a romantic masterpiece, extending upwards to conform to the natural shape of the almond. On these tiny surfaces, the grandiosity of the city’s architecture is expressed through the vibrancy of color and the dreamy, sweeping whims of the artist’s brush.

Perhaps the most poignant aspect of Kale’s work is its impermanence. Unlike the great canvases entombed in museums, these paintings will decay, perish, or be lost. The banana will rot into mush; the fragile quail egg might crumble. A stunning mosque might accidentally be eaten. But in the meantime, these imagined landmarks exist for the sake of our wonderment. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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Symbols Of Sikh: The New Faces Of An Old Religion Captured Like Never Before

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Amit and Naroop - photograph

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The Singh Project is a wonderful, celebratory look at a modern, multicultural Britain and features members of the Sikh community. British photographers Amit and Naroop are exhibiting 35 very different portraits as a visual exploration of faith, style and identity. These intimate images highlight two very important symbols of the Sikh lifestyle – the beard and the turban (Dahar). The turban in particular is a representation of honor, self-respect, courage, spirituality, and piety. Sikh men (and women) wear the turban to cover their long, uncut hair (kesh), and are also seen in this series brandishing a traditional Sikh sword (kirpan).

Originating in South Asia – primarily in India, Singh was a popular middle name or surname for lords and warriors. Meaning Lion (from the Sanskrit word Simha/Sinha), it was later adopted by the Sikh religion, and today is compulsory for all baptized Sikh males. The sense of pride connected with the history of the name Singh is evident on the faces of these men. They obviously are very proud of being Sikh and enjoy their religion outwardly.

“Many religions determine the way their followers look, but none have such a dramatic and definite ‘look’ as Sikhism. And yet, with 30 million Sikhs in the world, there are almost as many ways to wear the turban and beard as there are Sikhs…The men who feature in this project are businessmen, boxers, IT professionals, doctors, fashion stylists, temple volunteers, magicians and a host of other occupations all adapting and interpreting the Sikh traditions in their own way.” (Source)

The appeal of the beard is still proving popular – after successfully raising 10,000 pounds through Kickstarter (see video here), Amit and Naroop are hosting a free exhibition of the prints opening at The Framers Gallery in Central London from 3rd-15th November.

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A Behind The Scenes Look Into One Of The Last Handmade Globe Makers

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With the availability of digital mapping systems, the tabletop globe seems almost like a vestige of ancient times. The globes we do encounter—in our classrooms, or in antique stores—are either cheap and mass-produced or delicate and expensive. In a fascinating project to reinvigorate the art of globe-making, Peter Bellerby of Bellerby & Co. Globemakers is creating globes entirely by hand, from stretching the gores (the strips of paper) and applying them carefully onto the sphere, to painting and illustrating the maps. The process takes at least 6 months to complete, and it’s not easy—without careful measurements, the globe will remain incomplete. Blending science with art, a perfection-derived sense of beauty inspires Bellerby’s work.

Bellerby’s project began when he was trying to find a good-quality globe for his father’s 80th birthday. His options were limited or unsatisfying, so he decided to create his own globe from scratch—an endeavor into which he poured months of research, money, and work. Realizing that there was a lack of globes being made by hand, Bellerby created his studio in 2008. Now, he works with a team of passionate (and patient) artists to bring back this ancient craft, creating everything from mini artisan desk globes to the “Churchill,” a behemoth globe spanning 127cm. His work has been widely recognized, and deservedly so; in an age when Google Maps magnifies and digitally fragments our perceptions of the earth, Bellerby’s globes demonstrate an intimate understanding of and respect for our planet as a whole.

Visit Bellerby & Co. Globemakers’ website to learn more. (Via Bored Panda)

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Tomas Januska’s Gravity Series Defies The Laws Of Nature

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In his photographic series, Gravity, Tomas Januska takes snapshots of human bodies in unnatural and usually impossible poses. Beautifully photographed with clean crisp backgrounds, Januska highlights the absurdities of the forms and figures of his subjects. These are frozen moments that we normally would not be able to witness. Girls look as if they have been caught in a hurricane, skirts and hair billowing out around them. Boys are snapped mid-flight, shoes, caps and props flung to the side.

Januska manages to capture either violent and frenetic energy in his subjects, or a very still and quiet introverted moment. Some people seem as if they have been woken from their slumber, picked up and dangled mid-air. Individual’s clothes add to their narrative – a business woman leaping in heels and twirling her jacket seems caught in a triumphant post-meeting moment, or celebrating the latest merger at work. Another girl arches her back, with her hand resting on her head, as if regretting a wrong decision recently made.

In these portraits we can see the full range of human expression – each twist, bend, tilt, grimace tells it’s own story. Every tilted head, crooked limb and flexed muscle doing so for a reason. “Gravity” is not only about capturing postures and poses, but also about the natural drama and theatricality inherent in our bodies. (via Juxtapoz)

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The Macabre Paintings Of Takato Yamamoto Intertwine Horror, Beauty, And Eroticism

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Takato Yamamoto paints intricate scenes of both delicate beauty and savage darkness. Yamamoto calls his style “Heisei Estheticism,” which blends traditional Ukiyo-e woodblock prints with images of bondage and horror akin to those found in modern manga. Serene-faced girls with bloodstained and skeletal bodies oversee their quiet victims; bodies punctured with arrows twist in what could be agony or sexual ecstasy. Despite his disturbing subject matter, however, Yamamoto never shows violence in its most gratuitous moment; instead, he depicts rising tension, conjuration, and the aftermath—the vampires recoiling with their prey, dark rituals blooming into grotesque beauty, and uncanny sexual encounters.

Sex and death are familiar lovers in Yamamoto’s works, wrapped up together like cadaverous bouquets that manifest the fusion of pleasure and pain. Morality is subsumed into visceral moments of seduction and satisfaction. Despite the brutality, there is a sensuality that emanates from the paintings—one that explores with detail the experiences of the body as it passes over thresholds of desire and mortality. With delicate lines and interwoven forms of beauty and rot, Yamamoto’s erotic nightmares stir the imagination.

Visit Yamamoto’s website and Facebook page to learn more. (Via Juxtapoz

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