Get Social:

Li Hongbo Arranges Thousands Of Paper Objects Into A Massive, Malleable Sculpture Of War Weapons

Li Hongbo - Sculpture Li Hongbo - Sculpture Li Hongbo - Sculpture Li Hongbo - Sculpture

Li Hongbo is a Beijing-based artist who builds elaborate and flexible paper sculptures that ripple and shift before our eyes. Featured here is “Irons for the Ages, Flowers for the Day,” a large-scale installation currently on display at the SCAD Museum of Art. The work—which spans the entirety of a gallery—involves thousands of small paper objects bound together by honeycomb layers of glue. Close up, the bright shapes align themselves like an undulating, flowery rainbow; step back, however, and you’ll see that together the shapes amass into the greater form of guns and artillery. In a surprising clash of innocent colors and delicate paper with the brutality of war, Hongbo produces a curious (and potentially deceitful) optimism for deadly weapons.

Hongbo’s work draws upon the ancient, cultural tradition of paper-making in China, which dates back to the Han Dynasty (206 BC–220 AD). Inspired by this art form, Hongbo has reinvented it on a grand scale. Other projects include malleable bodies and busts, such as a version of Michelangelo’s David that unfolds spectacularly. The ability to metamorphose is integral to Hongbo’s works; with the politics left aside (or at least ambiguous), his sculptures challenge our perceptions by unsettling solid forms with their built-in fluidity. Whether it’s guns or classical statues, we can’t help but to reconsider the materiality and purpose of objects as they transform before our eyes.

“Irons for the Ages, Flowers for the Day” will be showing until January 24th, 2016. Check out SCAD’s website to learn more. (Via designboom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ariane Irle

Ariane Irle’s portfolio is full of great experimental typography, illustration, and motion work.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Paintings That Capture Sinisterly Sweet Nostalgia

Nouar - PaintingNouar - PaintingNouar - Painting

Born in Tehran, amidst the 1980s political suffering and strife, Nouar’s family fled to Germany and then the US, where she resides today. Her oil and acrylic paintings touch on vintage commercial Americana with a sinister twist– but without being too cynical. Instead, each dollop of cream or slice of pie provokes a more tempting side of advertising, where the taste of nostalgia and its childlike promises are the main indulgence.

On this theme, the artist elaborates, “I have always been completely fascinated by our massive consumer culture and often feel everything around us is a commercial, constantly manipulating us into desiring things we don’t really have a need for, or shouldn’t want in the first place.”

Currently Trending

Jan Dunning

Picture 24

Jan Dunning manages to transform the rudimentary device of the pinhole camera and create strange and wondrous scenes with them. I love the idea of these expansive macrocosmos unfolding from the microcosm of a single point of light…kind of baffling! I remember using a pinhole in one of my first beginning photography classes and the most I got from the lens-less, shutter-less coffee can cam was blurry black and white blobs at best.

Currently Trending

Life Magazine Gives Us A Look Back At The Fashionable Teenagers Of The 1960’s

"Corona del Mar High School students Kim Robertson, Pat Auvenshine and Pam Pepin wear 'hippie' fashions, 1969."

“Corona del Mar High School students Kim Robertson, Pat Auvenshine and Pam Pepin wear ‘hippie’ fashions, 1969.”

"Southern California high school students, 1969."

“Southern California high school students, 1969.”

"High school teacher Sandy Brockman wears a bold print dress, 1969."

“High school teacher Sandy Brockman wears a bold print dress, 1969.”

"High school fashions, 1969."

“High school fashions, 1969.”

In fashion, what goes around comes around. What was stylish 20, 30, even more than 40 years ago can still make a comeback and look en vogue. LIFE magazine documented the 1969 trends of American youth culture, and many traces of them are still worn today.

Hippies and disco culture shaped the way people dressed themselves, and these fashions were considered “counter culture” at the time. Fringed vests, bell-bottom jeans, and miniskirts were part of the new trends and attitude towards expressing yourself through clothing. “The latest rule in girls’ high school fashion,” LIFE magazine wrote in 1969, “is that there isn’t any.”

While the same could be said today, these sartorial choices came from a much different place. The world was seeing a cultural transformation and just getting smaller with the growth of global telecommunication networks. The television become a thing in every household. Liv Combe of LIFE also explains, “The vast and near-visionary national highway system had spread across the country in the post-World War II years; more households than ever owned a car (or two); and for the first time, plane travel was becoming a viable option for many American families.

Denim jumpers, Peter Pan collars, and strappy sandals are all things popular back then which are still seen today. They might’ve seemed strange back then, but as with most things, counter culture eventually goes mainstream. With some of these photos, it might take you a moment to realize they aren’t from 2015. (Via Demilked and Time)

Currently Trending

Street Art Interventions To Disrupt Your Walk In The City

R1 street art2

R1 street art3

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To the street artist known as R1, the city is a living thing and he creates his ‘interventions’ accordingly.  The city and its streets are something we interact with each day.  R1’s simple interventions reveal our relationship with our urban homes.  Perhaps more importantly, though, it challenges us to interact with the city in an entirely new ways.  R1 says of his process:

“I consider the street as an open canvas. I work with urban interventions and collect every day found materials, transforming them and placing them back where they came from, to become a part of the city’s journey. The resulting artwork is tactile, moving within the motion of the cityscape.  Like the street, the work finds its meaning once an interaction with the passer-by takes place.”

Currently Trending

Marc Giai-Miniet’s Spectacular And Chilling Dioramas Inspired By Concentration Camps

Marc Giai-Miniet- DioramaMarc Giai-Miniet- Diorama

Marc Giai-Miniet- Diorama Marc Giai-Miniet- Diorama

French artist Marc Giai-Miniet packs hidden tales into small, elaborate dioramas, a craft he has been pursuing since the 90s. This month his work is on display in New York’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery in a show titled “Theatre of Memory.” His work explores remains; of libraries, laboratories, waiting rooms, dungeons, prisons, hospitals, interrogation rooms, all places with signs of evident use, but all completely absent of people.

“Every room in Giai-Miniet’s boxes are dismally packed with hoards of books and machinery. Influenced by childhood visits to the garage his father worked in as a mechanic, the utilitarian organization of objects has long been a theme of interest to the artist. This aesthetic was also greatly impacted by his exposure to images of the Holocaust at a young age, specifically how the Nazi regime systematically seized and cataloged the personal belongings of concentration camp victims.

 

Giai-Miniet views his boxes as a metaphor for the human condition, which is comprised of biological functions, as well as a desire to achieve intellectual and spiritual enlightenment. This duality is represented by the presence of machinery in the works, symbolizing the physical side of human nature, while literature suggests the logical side. The artist states, ‘From the whiteness of books to the darkness of sewers, there is a never-ending to and fro between the two main poles of humanity: bestiality and transcendence, human fragility and inaccessible divinity.'”(Excerpt from Source)

 

Currently Trending

Start The Holidays On The Right Foot- Launch Your Portfolio Site Today!

all_device_mockup_newyears

To celebrate the holidays our good friends at Made With Color want to offer Beautiful/Decay readers a special deal on their amazing website building platform.

Made With Color has a host of new designs to make your website look sleek and professional. Their service is custom built to help artists create well-designed and mobile/tablet responsive websites in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.

To spread some extra holiday cheer they’re offering our readers a 29% discount on the first year of service! Simply sign up and use discount code “holidaycheer in the “My Account” section of the site and enter your credit card info to let the savings roll in!
This discount code is valid through December 31st so make sure to enter your credit card and discount code in before then to redeem the 29% discount!

 

Currently Trending