Get Social:

The Post-Apocalyptic Weapons of Lucien Shapiro

Lucien Shapiro‘s sculptures are a bit frightening.  These baseball bats-turned-weapons seem to be pulled out of a post-apocalyptic neo-dark ages.  In fact, these sculptures are part of the larger Urban Obsessions series.  Like the title implies, the weapons suggest a sort of violent desperation, an urban restlessness taken to its hyperbolic end.  Also, the sculptures of Urban Obsessions are nearly ritualistic like implements of a a post-modern tribal religion.

Shapiro’s Bats will join the work of nine other artists in Group Show Vol. 3 at Denver’s Gildar Gallery.  The group exhibit opens Saturday January 12th and runs through February 1st.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Abstraction And Figuration Merge In Erik Jones’ Paintings

The disparate worlds of abstraction and figuration collide in the boldly colored paintings of Erik Jones. If those polar opposites weren’t enough Jones also tosses into the mix a healthy dose of organic and geometric mark making, creating explosive meditations on the human figure that at once feel analog and digital. (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Artwork Of The Day: Mad Cow Motorcycle

I’m loving Billie Grace Lynn’s Mad Cow Motorcycle.  A combination of electric motorcycle and cow bones. Could this be commentary on our dependence of fossil fuels?

Currently Trending

“Intifada Rap” Captures The Culture Of Rap Music In Palestine

IntifadaRap_11 IntifadaRap_18 IntifadaRap_43 IntifadaRap_42

As a generation in Palestine confronts misery, violence, and rejection, the hip hop scene is an outlet to express themselves. Photographer Pierre Mérimée and journalist Jacques Denis capture the young people involved in this scene in their new book, Intifada Rap. In it, we meet MWR’s Mahmoud Shalabi, the girls of Arapyot, and the “veterans” on the scene, including Said Mourad, the voice of the first Intifada.

The book’s press release describes it as:

A dive into the heart of the Palestinian hip hop scene, Intifada Rap bears witness to the incredible strength of the musical movement, from the suburbs of Tel Aviv through to Ramallah. Pierre Mérimée and Jacques Denis’ work shines a glaring light on the reality of Palestinian rap while offering an unprecedented view into the daily lives of a generation confronted with misery, violence and rejection, fighting back against it all to escape their imposed fates. Far from the shocking image of television news and the continual discussion of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the two journalists have documented the day to day lives of youth facing a dark future, for whom hip hope is more than just an escape. Armed only with their words, these men and women on the cusp of their twenties express their need for freedom, hope and equality through lucid texts and heavy beats.

 

You can purchase Intifada Rap here.

Currently Trending

Détournement: Signs of the Times, a Group Show at Jonathan LeVine

 

Last night,  Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea, NYC opened a group show entitled Détournement : Signs of the Times. The show includes works from some big names including Ron English, Shepard Fairey, Jamie Reid, Steve Powers, and Aiko Nakagawa. “Détournement” refers to the practice of altering the face of public signage to change their respective meanings. From curator Carlo McCormick (editor of PAPER magazine):

Employed brilliantly by the Situationists, whose great philosopher Guy Debord laid out the socio-aesthetic framework for this practice, détournements twist the terms of mimicry in ironic parody using the a semblance of the easily recognizable to dissemble and redirect the literal meaning of signs so as to construe a more honest picture of their deceptive intentions.

A natural response to the lies and coercions we are fed on a daily basis, the détournement has been the reactive impulse of all those who question reality, from the Punks who adopted it in the 1970s through Culture Jammers, Adbusters, contemporary street artists and the winding legacy of protest movements from WTO to Occupy.

More images of works in the show after the jump.

Currently Trending

Rosson Crow

596a_1228182474596b_1228182474Using a similarly garish color palette to Toulouse-Lautrec, Rosson Crow creates vibrantly haunting paintings of living spaces.

Currently Trending

Maksim Hem

unreachable

Collage artist Maksim Hem aptly titled this quiet series of works “Untitled Colours.” The name lends itself to the idea of objects overlooked, because they don’t scream and shout to get your attention. Hem’s restraint does not imply a lack of feeling but rather an attention to detail that is unnecessary to decorate. It’s like watching the Discovery Channel over Bravo–the life and times of baby cheetahs are just such a welcome change of pace.

Currently Trending