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Sarah Cameron Sunde Stands In The Ocean For 12 Hours Letting The Tide Rise And Fall Over Her Body

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Artist Sarah Cameron Sunde’s recent performance project 36.5 is what she refers to as a “durational performance with the sea”. In this project, she stands in an urban bay for the duration of a full tidal cycle, during which the water envelops her body and then recedes, while she remains still. The whole process takes 12 to 13 hours, during which she does not shift her position. This underlines the major role of time in her work, which she refers to as a “time based art project” At first glance 36.5 looks like a display of great endurance but, it goes beyond this, in the sense that her endurance comes with a message.

Sunde is staging a commentary on the relationship we have with water as individuals and on a greater scale as a civilization. She illustrates the rapid change of climate, as well as the impact we have on water and the impact it has on us. Her project is deeply anchored in the notions of time and change which she materializes by her presence within the process of the changing tide. Through this, she also aims to examine the “temporary nature of things”, such as the changing tides, or our physical existence. Her project is all the more interesting in due to the fact that she allows and encourages the audience to participate, thus creating a dialogue and underlining the significance and impact of such a piece. She has the plan to make her project go global in order to paint a bigger picture on an international level.

Sarah Cameron Sunde’s 36.5 has already taken place in Main, Mexico and California and will be taking place in Amsterdam and Venice .Photographs by Gus Ford and Irina Patkanian

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Devotion: Lauren Everett Documents The Spiritual Practices Of Santa Muerte In Los Angeles

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Last week, we shared the work of Lauren Everett and her Rocky Horror portraiture project. This week, we’re proud to feature Devotion, a series of photographs exploring the inner worlds of Los Angeles’ alternative religion communities—specifically, those surrounding Santa Muerte. With a keen eye for detail, Everett provides a unique glimpse into private ceremonies, such as cleansing rituals and spiritual masses such as Misa Blanca. Also shown are candle-lit altars, where Santa Meurte herself can be seen, represented as a hooded skeletal figure brandishing a scythe in one hand, the world in the other.

Translating as “Holy Death,” the origins of Santa Muerte are unknown, but (as Everett states) she is believed to be a “syncretism of The Virgin Mary and the Mesoamerican goddess Mictecacihuatl” (Source). To her believers, she represents healing, peaceful death, and a safe transition into eternity. Worship mainly occurs privately in homes, where people construct shrines and host ceremonies. As Everett’s photos reveal, devotees also gather at temples to receive group blessings and share stories of healing.

Everett expertly and compassionately explores a community that is not clearly represented (or perhaps even understood) by a more general audience. The imagery absorbs the imagination, but even more compelling are the portraits of the individual devotees engaging in private practices; take Sysiphus, for example, who stands with his wife in blue robes in their temple on Melrose Avenue. Also featured is Orisaneke, a woman who can be seen preparing carnation bouquets for Misa Blanca. These intimate shots invoke the immersive history and tradition of Santa Meurte, as well as the value and beautiful diversity of alternative spiritual practices.

To see more photos from Devotion, including insightful information on the individual photos, visit Everett’s website.

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Nick Pedersen’s Overgrown Post-Apocalyptic Environments

 

“My goal with this project is to create striking juxtapositions between the ruins of modern civilization and a futuristic ecological utopia.”

Brooklyn-based artist/illustrator Nick Pedersen -whom we featured in the 6th installment of our limited edition book series– recently finished a new batch of work entitled Ultima. The loosely narrative series depicts a post-apocalyptic environment in which conflicts between modern and early cultures, and man and the natural world are given prominent attention. In the world that Pedersen has conjured, overgrown cities (though absent of their typical, busy inhabitants) are full of life. The lush, green environments project a vibrancy that’s really appealing. But the digital works have their quiet aspects too- deer slowly pick their way through the brush; and stoic, masked tribesmen explore their bizarre surroundings. Check out more images from Ultima after the jump.

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Hara Katsiki’s Victorian Ancestoral Memories

Greek artist Hara Katsiki’s Portrait series delves into the subconscious with highly stylized renderings on top of vintage photography.

“I’m extremely fascinated by old pictures. Especially from the Victorian era.  With an almost automatic drawing i transform them in a strange and surreal world of a fusion of clandestine Voodoo, ancestral memory, and personal revelation. I give them life again through my imagination.
I’m like a medium. I allow my hand to move randomly ,expressing the subconscious so that the final result may reveal something of the psyche.  I do not always look to tell a story or create meaning.
Sometimes by looking deeper you can find your own.”

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Heather Marie Scholl Proves “It’s Hard Being a Woman” Through Feminist Embroidery

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Merging art, fashion, and feminism, Heather Marie Scholl uses hand-embroidered textiles and knit works of art to make social statements. In her latest project, “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman,” Scholl combines her own “personal narrative with larger conversations about the body, women, feminism, identity, and sexuality” to address male-on-female domestic violence and empower its victims.

Ironically alluding to Tammy Wynette’s song, “Stand by Your Man,” and imagined as a means of visual storytelling, the fashion installation project will present several of Scholl’s creations, spanning embroidery, clothing, and sculpture. The subjects of the garments and textiles featured in “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman”—which Scholl playfully refers to as her “second coming out”—range from portraits of women to quotations both empowering and unsettling. Given its highly potent and deeply personal content, it is no wonder that Scholl describes the sentiment behind the project as “an amazing ‘fuck you’ attitude.”

Be sure to check out Scholl’s intricate and empowering pieces at FiveMyles Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be a Woman” will be on view through November 7.

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JOEL TETTAMANTI’s Snow World

Swiss photographer Joel Tettamanti documents every corner of the world from Vietnam to Rome. However I find his 2009 series of images from Greenland called  Aasiaat completely mesmerizing. perhaps it’s how the snow covers every inch of the ground or the brightly colored buildings but there is just something magical about this series that makes me want to book the next plane to Greenland to start the worlds biggest snow fight. (via holyghost)

 

 

 

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Cayce Zavaglia’s Incredibly Real Embroidered Portraits That Look Like Paint

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American artist Cayce Zavaglia considers herself a painter.  “Although the medium employed is crewel embroidery wool, the technique borrows more from the worlds of drawing and painting”, the artist comments on her statement.

Manipulating color, especially paint with a brush, is obviously easier than manipulating color with varying wool strings and needles. That seems kind of impossible, don’t you think? Zavaglia makes it looks like a seamless process, laborious but not too difficult to actually achieve.

“Initially, working with an established range of wool colors proved frustrating.”

Painterly portraits demand for loose brushstrokes and intermingling colors, varying tones, and contrasting hues; creating a technique that would allow her to do this with wool strings was something that Zavaglia struggled with. However, with time, she came up with a system of sewing the threads in a sequence that would ultimately give the allusion of a certain color or tone. The system allowed for the threads to mimic the depth,volume, and form that we are familiar with in paintings and color drawings.

My work unabashedly nods its head to the tradition of tapestry and my own love of craft. Using wool instead of oils has allowed me to broaden the dialogue between portrait and process as well as propose a new definition for the word “painting”.

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BigBang- Pola Esther Takes Us Behind The Scenes Of A Music Video For The Biggest K-Pop Group

Pola Esther - Digital Photography

Pola Esther - Digital Photography

Pola Esther - Digital Photography

Polish photographer Pola Esther takes us behind the scenes of the concert film of the K-Pop world’s hottest band, Big Bang. Although the South Korean band’s five infamous members star in this film, Esther has turned an eye onto the bad girls that steal the show. The unforgettable women in the film include Gia Genevieve, Stephanie Shiu, TK, and Briana Michelle, and cameo appearance of James Goldstein. The photographer gives us a glimpse behind the scenes us of the powerhouse characters on set.

The creators of the film, Dikayl Rimmasch and Ed Burke, have had their hand in cinematic music videos before. They also collaborated on Jay-Z and Beyonce’s film “Bang Bang” featured during “On the Run” tour which has a similar film noir feel as the Big Bang’s film. The film’s unmistakable style pulls inspiration from American mythology. This incredibly dramatic film portrays the group in high-speed car chases, like that of the Fast and the Furious, and Tarantino-like scenes similar to Reservoir Dogs that are full of high tension. Esther, now based in New York City, has a photographic style that fits together perfectly with the seductive qualities of the film directors’ approach. Her work takes us one step deeper, showing us a little of whom these bad girls are in the film. Each photograph holds a sense of classic mystery, with the flair of old Hollywood. Make sure to check out more of Esther’s captivating and sensual photographs on her website.

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