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Constance And Eric Redefine Sexy In Their Intimate Photographs Of Couples

Constance and Eric photography Constance and Eric photography Constance and Eric photography Constance and Eric photography

Constance & Eric are a married couple from Brooklyn who have carved a niche and figured out how to make a living taking pictures of people having sex.  Blurring the lines between high art and commercial photography, the duo have photographed over 140 couples.  Beginning the project out of disappointment in the way commercial photography generally treats bodies and sex, the couple came up with their own parameters for “sexy.”  Disenchanted, as many of us are, by the narrow definition advertising and media give to the term, Constance and Eric decided to pursue a visual journey through the erotic and corporeal.

Subtle in their abstraction, the duo’s photographs transcend pornography or explicit imagery and become mere suggestions of the actual act.  But there is a sensual nature to the images that feels incredibly personal, even if a viewer can’t actually discern what precisely he is looking at.   In an interview with Nerve, Constance said, “The abstract images help create more of a feeling of the moment.  It enables the viewer to put themselves in the image without the distraction of recognizable features.”

In an interview with Huffington Post Constance and Eric said that the part of their job they enjoy the most is “Showing people how beautiful they are together.”  Check out their website, and if you’re brave enough, grab your significant other and contact them for a session.  (via HuffPost & Nerve)

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Angelo Plessas

Angelo Plessas

Greek-Italian net artist Angelo Plessas uses the internet to create websites that are strange, nervous and poetic at the same time. These websites are mostly interactive drawings and Plessas’ subjects usually involve femininity and portraits of people around him or many sides of himself. These internet pieces often “cover” the real world as objects like murals, installations, collage drawings and prints. His work is similar to that of Rafael Rozendaal’s: short, full-screen, sometimes interactive, Flash movies (they’re small on this blog but they’re pretty invasively pleasing in their native forms). I believe the latter had proclaimed them as some sort of movement, which begs the question of which chicken or egg laid claim on their piece of the internet pie.

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Rye Rye

Great video with M.I.A. protege Rye Rye by our friends at Coolhunting.com.  This video visits the rising star in the studio working on her yet as unreleased album and at a WWD Daily photo shoot. The 18-year-old Baltimore native shares the story of how she came up, a few dance moves and what she likes to rap about.

It’s amazing how kids that are still in highschool are making such big waves w/out major record labels. You can thank the internet for that!

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Erwin Olaf

Erwin Olaf‘s high gloss photography has a dark twist that I just love.  His Royal Blood and Grief series were my favorite, though all of his sets have quirky themes to them.

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Precious Dioramas Built Inside Tiny Sardine Cans

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Packed within the four walls of a tiny 6 by 10 centimeter sardine can, the miniature characters created by sculptor Nathalie Alony for her project Home Sweet Home are both humorous and poignant. Arranged in a massive grid, the artist’s sardine can dioramas serve as a metaphor for the confined apartments in which we nest. These intricate figurines—men, women, children, beloved pets—each exist within the limits of their aluminum enclosure, building complex family and personal universes that seem to operate independently of the outside world. Despite the isolation of each piece, together Alony’s cans form a complex network that wakes and rests as a unified community, separated only by thin, delicate metal.

Like strange dollhouses, these precious sardine can apartments allow us to navigate and to find meaning in the rituals of domestic life. Much of the action portrayed here is banal: the routine laundering of children’s clothes, the checking off of days on a calendar, the painting of walls. When seen in miniature, intricately rendered by the artist’s masterful hands, mundane home improvement tasks become endlessly enthralling. Here, we can be voyeurs in the most innocent sense, entering the intimate confines of the homes of others with tender curiosity.

Alony’s brilliant little worlds capture the lonesomeness of modern living; seeing the fourth aluminum wall pulled back to reveal precious, private lives, we yearn for a similar intimacy in real life. A home, carved out lovingly from a tiny industrial box, contains all the secrets and wonders of families that are not our own. What goes on in the cherished homes of others? (via Junk Culture and Lost at E Minor)

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D▲NIEL

D▲NIEL photographs

There’s all sort of crazy images popping up on the Beautiful/Decay Flickr Pool these days. These photo’s come courtesy of D▲NIEL, a graphic design student from Costa Rica. This is proof of the mystical powers of Beautiful/Decay Book 1. Just look at the coincidences between our cover and these photos. Skulls… check. Candles… check. Mystical crystals…check. You should get a copy of Book 1 and join the B/D cult!

Want to have your work posted on beautifuldecay.com? Join our Flickr pool and submit your work!

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Michael Craig-Martin’s Wall Paintings Transform Everyday Objects Into The Extraordinary

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Michael Craig-Martin has been creating art since the 1960s. His wall painting installations from the 1990s and 2000s feel current with their bright colors and flat appearance, but some of the items in the paintings, ubiquitous at the time they were captured, are now relics. Among the shoes and pails rendered in black tape outlines are Nokia style cell phones and milk bottles. That doesn’t diminish the charm of these installations. Craig-Martin’s intent was to make these works in a generic style, even attempting to erase his personality from the works by using tape as outlines instead of pencil drawings. It didn’t work. The purposeful non-style of painted mass-produced items executed meticulously in a vibrant palette at enlarged scale has become one of Craig-Martin’s signatures. The choice of everyday objects for his wall installations was a purposeful one.

“I thought the objects we value least because they were ubiquitous were actually the most extraordinary. … I wanted people to realise how extraordinary everyday objects are, and think about what image-making is. The impulse was never nostalgia, kitsch or a critique of consumerism.” (Source)

Photos of the installations can only capture part of their impact. Walking around a corner only to be confronted with an enormous pink desk lamp is part of the experience, as are the shifting views of eyeglasses and belts through the arches of a candy-colored room. Only when standing next to a seven-foot extinguisher can the scale of the articles be truly appreciated.

Though he is often called a conceptual artist, Craig-Martin prefers to be called radical. It’s not just about the concept for him—the making that comes from the idea is equally important. “Throughout his career, through work in many different media, he has explored the expressive potential of commonplace objects and images.”

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Hassan Hajjaj’s All-Girl Moroccan Biker Gang

Hassan Hajjij - Metallic Lambda on 3 mm white Dibond

Hassan Hajjaj - Metallic Lambda on 3 mm white Dibond

Hassan Hajjaj - Metallic Lambda on 3 mm white Dibond

Hassin Hajjij - Metallic Lambda on 3 mm white Dibond

Photographer Hassan Hajjaj‘s latest project focuses on the sub culture of young women bikers from Marrakesh. Titled the “Kesh Angels”, he created striking images of groups of women wearing colorful veils and djellabah straddling worn scooters and motorbikes.
They represent something quite traditional, yet also astoundingly subversive and daring.

The women all hold strong poses, and are somewhat confrontational. Hajjaj places them within bright and beautiful frames – choosing different images and symbols from the Medina, all with a distinct Pop Art feel.

Primarily a portrait photographer, Hajjaj is well versed in bringing out the colorful character of his subjects. He started his career taking photos of friends, artists, musicians and strangers on the streets of Marrakesh. His style perfectly embodies the social, active and vitality of the culture in northern Africa, while offering a glimpse into the more unknown aspects.

Using a slight hip hop influence, Hajjaj also reflects on issues of consumerism, branding and globalization and how these issues affect a place like Morocco. The subtlety and humor he uses to approach such complex subjects is very effective. Seeing these women in traditional clothing, branded with Nike is unsettling at the very least – and that’s not even mentioning the motorbike in the middle of the scenario. Engaging in what is usually a male dominated activity, these women are breaking many taboos, and display an easy confidence about it all.

Hajjaj has been involved in many projects aimed at raising awareness of the treatment and roles of women in Morocco. With such a strong visual language, he is definitely succeeding in capturing our attention.

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