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Pedro Lourenco

pL_praga_pinto Pedro Lourenco, a Portugal based artist and illustrator, presents some really interesting drawings, gifs, T-shirt designs and more on his blog, “Ink and Paper.” Each piece has a simplicity and uniqueness all its own.

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Luke Painter

Luke painter’s vividly rendered drawings could be sets for dreams where everything is still, calm, and just a bit frightening.

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Fernanda Veron

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Fernanda Veron believes it’s important to sometimes have your head in the clouds, and belong to the past and future while simultaneously remaining in the present. Every moment is fleeting, but Veron is there to document every passing emotion. She asserts that, despite the fact her works seem to resist an existence in a single time frame, they are autobiographical, and perhaps a testimony to her refusal to live solely in the present.

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Christopher Kline Makes Art with MMA Fighters and Battering Rams

Christopher Kline is a Berlin-based artist doing some pretty interesting stuff with installation and performance pieces, collage, textiles, and limited-run publishing. Kline’s works, though disparately mixed in scale and platform, maintain a common thread through his personal, vibey folk mysticism and material-based focus. From his “Holy Ropes” zine to elaborate performances involving MMA fighters and battering rams, the artist’s particular vision is a constant presence. Kline’s art finds comfort in the unfamiliar by exploring far out subject matter through down-to-earth means.

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Hannalie Taute’s Embroiders Beautifully Fractured Portraits Stitched On Car Tires

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Using discarded inner tubes and a needle and thread, South African artist Hannalie Taute embroiders portraits onto rubber. She takes cuts the abandoned material and cuts them apart to stitch together and form a “canvas.” Often, this means that her subjects have a subtle honeycomb pattern as their backdrop. “Besides the durability and availability of rubber from inner tubes found in car tires, I also decided to embroider on rubber because I find the contrast of working with needle and thread on these inner tubes fascinating,” she says in an artist statement.

As you might imagine, rubber is a tough surface to embroider on. Every stitched line is shown, and Taute isn’t able to seamlessly blend together the different hues. The results are fractured areas of color that abstract her portraits, although not to the point of unrecognition. And, this is partially the idea – to subvert materials. The rubber’s coarse texture is offset by the delicate thread, but at the same time the thread can seem rough with its choppy arrangement.

The artist’s inspiration comes from a number of places, but boil down to identity. She writes:

Titles, words, phrases from books, music, stories, sayings and toys play an integral part in conveying meaning and biographical info about me as a mother, wife and artist in society.  Relationships between people and objects are something I prefer to explore using my chosen medium.

Taute’s work is currently on display at the Erdmann Contemporary Gallery in Capetown. Entitled Cross My Heart, it’s on view from now until March 30 of this year. (Via Jung Katz)

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Green Art: 10 Artists Working with Recycled Materials

David Edgar, "Green Fiesta Jellyfish Lamp"

David Edgar, "Green Fiesta Jellyfish Lamp"

The people of the United States alone toss out millions of plastic bottles every hour, and in a year, enough plastic film to shrink wrap Texas (which would be both a hilarious and horrifying feat.) Everyone knows it’s important to recycle, but it’s often hard to realize the consequences of forgetting about one little bottle; maybe we should consider not buying this stuff in the first place. (I drink out of the tap all the time, heck, I’d drink out of the hose.) Without getting on a soapbox, the following artists have made powerful statements about the ways in which we waste…. by re-using materials that would otherwise be thrown away, and removing paper and plastics completely from the recycling loop…. as even the act of recycling uses massive amounts of energy.

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Luke Ramsey

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It’s been on the street and it’s been in shows all over – Luke Ramsey has taken his work from something rugged to something refined and maintained the exact same detailed aesthetic all through it. His illustrations really play on the versatility of the “line.” His limited use of color makes his drawings that much more intense to look at – like Meatwad, after the jump, which is primarily constructed of one kind of squiggly line. They’re funny, cynical, sometimes dark, but always captivating. – there’s something light and relatable about it.

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Joseba Eskubi’s Mysterious Landscapes Of Visual Splendor

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Painter Joseba Eskubi’s lusciously-crafted landscape paintings have both an incredible energy and a certain mystique to them. The gestural brush strokes signify movement like the wind or temperamental weather, and they exist in these desolate locations with brilliantly-colored dark sky; it’s like the bluish-purple that marks the middle of the night.

All of Eskubi’s paintings feels like they exist in the same world, but each sets the stage different for its own strange happenings. A lot of these structures are reminiscent of weeping trees or their twisted branches. These lines create an interesting visual tension that doesn’t necessarily feel threatening at the moment, but it was at one time (or maybe in the future?). It’s an uncertain, post-apocalyptic shelter. But unlike the stereotypical gray landscape, Eskubi has created a place of visual splendor.

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