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As you know we have never put our subscriptions on sale before. We count on every dollar that we make from subscription sales to keep Beautiful/Decay going as ALL our revenue comes from book sales. Our profits slim down when we discount an already discounted product (regular subscription price is already 33% off the cover price) so we need as many of you as possible to subscribe to make up for the loss in volume. The response so far has been great, with many of you putting your money where your mouth is and securing Beautiful/Decay’s future. So please spread the word about our biannual subscription sale and buy a subscription for a friend or two. You won’t get these prices for a minimum of another 6 months and you’ll help us share the work of millions of talented artists with the world.

Use discount code Discountdecaysub and get a one year subscription for only $34.00! This deal will only be good for one week and will expire on February 23rd.

 

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Dea Lellis

Dea Lellis is an artist from São Paulo, Brazil.  She creates charming illustrations filled with humor and a dash of edge.

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The Magnetism Behind Danielle Nelson Mourning’s Photography

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If you take a peek at Danielle Nelson Mourning’s blog, you will find wonderfully candid observations about places, things, or people she’s encountered and how they influence her creative perspective. For instance, there is a post about Marchus who has Stargardt, a rare eye condition. Mourning writes about his desire to experience more smells in artwork, specifically, “leaves in a forest which change constantly depending on light.” Then, there is Tod Papageorge’s brave encounter with Garry Winogrand which leads to a lifelong art-filled friendship. Mourning talks about this pair with honest admiration.

Each quick note or meditation brings us back to Mourning’s own body of work– drawing us deeper into the magnetism which aids in cultivating her own quietly powerful narratives. It’s an appreciation for the human condition and all its ephemeral passions. Although Mourning started out in the commercial world, it’s clear her heart transcends that superficial artifice.

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Andrea Tese Captures Her Grandfather’s Life Through Photos Of His Belongings

Andrea Tese creates Inheritance, a poignant and thought-provoking photographic series that involves a deeply personal documentation of the artist’s mourning process following the passing of her grandfather. Apart from it being a personal tool for grieving, the Inheritance project is also an exploration of existential ideas in regards to legacy, impermanence, and the definition of self.

These photographs function simultaneously as an acknowledgement to the ephemeral nature of life and as an indulgence in man’s unwillingness to give in to this understanding – his desire to arrest time, to counter anonymity, to leave something behind, to be immortal.

By rearranging the mundane objects that filled Grandpa’s home before his passing, Tese creates these pictorial compositions that recreate her grandfather’s life in a profound, and powerful but controversial way. In essence, here, we see life as a collection of objects, a rather simple and intuitive idea, but one that certainly makes us think whether we get to leave this world with a valuable legacy or not. Are material objects our life-long legacy to our family and friends, and is that enough? Do our personal belongings carry the essence of our being?

Anyhow, it is inevitable to dismiss the fact that Tese does capture her grandfather’s spirit through his ‘junk’. After all, with most philosophical questions aside, it is fair to say that our stuff will be the only tangible pieces of self that will be left after our death. Inheritance is a definite ” poignant reminder that our junk will outlast us all.” (via Co.Design)

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Andres Serrano’s Powerful Images Of Death

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The Morgue (Infectious Pneumonia)

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The Morgue (Pneumonia drowning)

The Morgue (Death Unknown)

The Morgue (Death Unknown)

Artist Andres Serrano‘s series of photographs The Morgue investigates ideas of death and our relationship with it.  Working with a forensic pathologist Serrano photographed the bodies with a near classical beauty rarely associated with the morgue.  Serrano ensured the anonymity of each person through tight cropping or veiling the face.  The way in which the light interacts with the bodies and their veils is reminiscent of Italian baroque painting.  The chiaroscuro of each photograph seems to underscore some mystery behind death balancing the morgue’s comparatively cold analytic approach.  Further, the careful attention to detail and composition dignifies each person.  Each subject, some actually unknown persons, are considered individually as initial shock gives way to contemplation and reflection.  However, these are not sentimental images.  There still remains a certain emotional detachment, a terrible loneliness in death, and Serrano’s intention is ambiguous.  Each photograph’s title is each subject’s respective cause of death, and have been inserted in each photographs’ caption.  Also, please note: Some may consider these photographs to be graphic and/or disturbing.  (via boum!bang!)

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Casey Richardson’s Digital Sculptures Look Real But Only Live In Computers

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Casey Richardson

These impressive digital sculptures were created by Melbourne-based graphic design student Casey Richardson. Richardson uses 3D software to illustrate installation scenes that could be mistaken for real-life sculptures. Richardson implements simple and oft-used sculptural subjects, but places them in new contexts. His images are bright and cheerfully colored, though the subject matter itself usually conveys the opposite.This creates an interesting juxtaposition of form and content within each scene’s composition. Most intriguing to me is the way Richardson has implemented wall color in each imagined installation. This has me wondering when I’ll start seeing more gallery walls painted as part of a sculptural installation, and how installation design and implementation will continue to be affected by advances in technology. (via art ruby)

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Documentary Watch: Julian Schnabel

When I think of Julian Schnabel I think of many things but inspiring artist mentor is not what comes to mind. However after watching this half hour documentary I just may have changed my mind. Created by HBO and non-profit YoungArts, this video documents a day of intimate mentorship with the notorious painter and filmmaker where he discusses his working process, various bodies of work, and how his flims and paintings inform one another. One of the most memorable parts of the documentary comes towards the end when Schnabel tells the teenage artists “If you’re scared, You’re fucked.” This piece of advice may seem a bit harsh but I have to admit that I’ve warmed up to Schnabel after seeing how generous he is with his advice and time without sugarcoating the harsh realities of being an artist. The students walked away from the experience excited about creating and experimenting and I think I may have as well. Watch the full documentary posted above and remember whatever you do… don’t be scared!

 

 

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Patrick Jacobs’ Incredible Hyper-realistic Dioramas

Artist Patrick Jacobs creates highly intricate dioramas.  His dioramas, once created, are installed inside the gallery wall and fitted with a large lens.  Gallery visitors can spy on each of the miniature scenes through these lenses.  Jacobs’ dioramas are often of idealized landscapes or peaceful indoor scenes carefully detailed to appear as entirely separate worlds.  Hidden lighting glows as if entirely natural while the foreground seamlessly blends with a background and further to the horizon.

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