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Best Of 2012: Delta- From Graffiti To Architecture

It’s always interesting to see what graffiti writers do in the fine art world. Some keep rehashing the same work on canvas, losing all of the power that energized the work by having it in the streets. However some artists such as the legendary Dutch graffiti artist Delta take what they’ve learned through their years of painting letterforms and create amazing new works that re-imagine architecture, space, installation and painting. Wondering what Delta’s graffiti looked like back in the day? Click the read more button and check out the last image.

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A Behind The Scenes Glimpse into Installing Famous Works Of Art

 

Have you ever walked into a gallery or museum and wondered “How did they ever install that giant sculpture or painting?” Well  WRAPIT-TAPEIT-WALKIT-PLACEIT comes to the rescue with a collection of amazing behind the scenes shots of gallery assistants and museum installers moving, assembling, and dissembling all your favorite works of art. Go through their deep archives or submit your own behind the scenes images and share what it takes to make art magic happen. (via)

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Chajana denHarder’s Chopped Up Bodies

Chajana denHarder, an artist based over at Washington D.C., has assembled a very hypnotic series of digitally manipulated photographs that deals with the investigation of divergence and assimilation.

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Elisa Strozyk

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Here’s a lovely German artist to start your Thursday morning off right. Elisa Strozyk makes work that is beautiful and clean, but often seems to have a functional purpose. She creates wooden textiles, hand cuts her own wallpaper and even made a radiator that changes color as it heats up. Elisa has upcoming exhibitions in Frankfurt, Cologne and Milan.

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Tony Hammond’s Wonderfully Minimalistic iPhone Photography

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United Kingdom based photographer Tony Hammond takes beautifully minimal photographs using only his iPhone and bit of editing before posting the images to Instagram. Each image features a simple object or subject framed by a brilliant, soft, pastel color palette. Most of Hammond’s compositions include an artful use of negative space that minimizes the objects or scenes he’s capturing. The enormity of this tinted negative space informs each captured moment by revealing its quaintness. Some of Hammond’s images feature particular shapes and lines – birds circling overhead or jet streams crossing each other’s paths. Hammond’s photography breathes soft ethereal life into simple scenes, creating moments of poetry that we recognize in our everyday experience.

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Tatiana Blass’s Wax Figures Melt From Within

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Metade da fala no chão_ Piano surdo, Tatiana Blass [Half of the speech on the ground – deaf piano] from Tatiana Blass on Vimeo.

Tatiana Blass built a human body that leans over the spine of a chair. She built this body out of wax and gave it a spotlight to shine; however, its glow not only illuminated, but also curdled the figure’s shape with heat. Arms broke off and bone emerged. Soon the body itself was only spine.

Spine against spine.

On another day, at another location or time, Blass built another body, a lying down one. The heat was not on the back, but instead rising from below. The body melted and there was no bone. Only a puddle of wax, something similar to where the body began.

The dissolution is the performance, the performer is the object: it moves to mirror our horror, to show its aliveness: our aliveness.

This concept of sculpture as a temporary structure feels relative to Urs Fischer’s own monolithic candlelit figures which also weaken over time. Both generate a sense of narrative that we relate to instantly– feelings of loss or devastation amidst chaos. Ashes to ashes. Dust to dust. Wax to wax. What slips through our fingers: a certain temperature from day to day. We cannot gauge. An inevitable ritual.

The music must come to an end, and it does, especially for Blass’s other installation (video above), as Thiago Curry pounds five easy pieces on the keys, while two men pour melted paraffin into the grand piano.

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Guillermo Mora Creates Brightly Colored Sculptures From 550 Pounds Of Acrylic Paint

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Guillermo Mora - Acrylic Paint and Rubber Bands

Guillermo Mora - Acrylic Paint and Rubber Bands

Spanish artist Guillermo Mora creates oozing folds of vibrant color from little more than piles of acrylic paint. An accomplished artist whose work was recently featured at this past Art Basel in Miami, this innovate sculptor creates incredible installations made from just two simple materials. Rubber bands and leather belts are the only things holding together his shiny clumps of paint. Mora’s process is almost surreal, as he dumps buckets of acrylic magentas and baby blues onto the floor to begin. After the paint dries, he simply lifts the now hardened paint, and proceeds to fold and wrap his glossy, pastel creations. To add further to Mora’s highly textural and tangible installations, many of the artist’s sculptures have a crackled, rough grain to the paint.

Many of Mora’s installations are unique, as his work often morphs and transforms to the space that it inhabits. Mora’s choice of medium allows him to manipulate it to fit in the space as he sees fit, such as hanging from the ceiling, running down a wall, or folded into a corner. This allows the artwork to demonstrate a strong focus on color and form. Mora’s use of seemingly traditional materials continues to mystify us as he changes the way viewers think about acrylic paint and what it is capable of.

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Emily Burns’ Pin-up Ladies and Taxidermy

Paintings and drawings by Emily Burns.

“My recent work references a variety of artistic techniques and influences from traditional oil painting and modern digital photography to the iconography of ancient Egypt , the American pin-up and nineteenth-century taxidermy. In this group of work, I seek to chronicle the relationship between the genesis of female icon objectification and its historical development. These works describe the psychological juxtaposition between the inherent urge to exploit one’s own short-lived youth and the pressures of adhering to social expectation. I explore the push and pull of these two concepts, asking how they have affected the female psyche and as well as how society has actively created its own vision of the idealized female.

My source material includes a range of visual elements, attempting to portray diverse visualized vernaculars, both past and present, into single compositions. My centralizing of the female figure illustrates the tensions and conflicts between the power of their beauty and strength of their character, as well as their inevitable vulnerability. Historically, artists have exploited the tradition of realistic oil portraiture not only to create a likeness, but also to embody the essential character of the subject. My paintings reconcile traditional portraiture with the more modern idea of an active subject, depicted not solely based upon her social status, but immortalized for her beauty and appeal. Similarly, the inclusion of taxidermied trophy animal heads alludes to the vulnerability of a creature that is prized for its beauty, complicating the notion of power attributed to the anthropomorphized deities of the ancient Egyptians. Finally, the figures are foregrounded against fragmented views of digital interruption and pixilation, serving to remind one of how computerized communication has profoundly affected how we reimagine the female form.”

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