Get Social:

Things That Exist


The Things That Exist from Beautiful/Decay Magazine on Vimeo.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jeff Eisenberg’s Future Forts

Jeff Eisenberg’s ultra detailed drawings are a mix between a bunker, a childhood fort, and a conspiracy theory nuts home in the year 2099.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Worlds Largest Kaleidoscope Made Of Swarovski Crystals

Built in 1995 in the Austrian village of Wattens, Swarovski World is perhaps the worlds most unusual Flagship store/theme park. Designed by multimedia artist André Heller, the site features 14 underground chambers of wonder dedicated to the versatile artistic interpretation of the material crystal. The result is a universe of discoveries and a simply unique experience that is a must see for your next Austrian vacation.

Some of our favorite Attractions at Swarovski World include:

Crystal Dome: With 590 mirrors covering its walls, the Crystal Dome offers a kaleidoscope rich with colours: light is reflected in all facets. This breathtaking spectacle is stylishly accentuated with music by Brian Eno.

Mechanical Theater: The desire for transformation, passion and erotic fantasies excites people – and also the mechanical world of Jim Whiting. An Adonis and the graceful Walking Woman represent the male-female relationship and form the central motif of the British artist’s stomping, leaping installation. However, the mechanical theatre could also be described as a surreal fashion show in which rigid things suddenly spring to life and clothes fly and dance through the air as if by magic.

Crystaloscope: The crystaloscope is the biggest kaleidoscope in the world. Upon taking a look inside, the harmonizing power of crystal becomes perceivable to body and soul. The installation, designed by André Heller and therapist Peter Mandl, casts endless variations of images that appear from the ever emerging crystal formations.

Watch a video of Swarovski World and see more pictures after the jump! (via)

Currently Trending

Alexis Anne Mackenzie’s Fragile Hand-Cut Forms

We have featured the work of San Francisco based Alexis Anne Mackenzie in the past (here). She continues to master the art of hand-cut collage with her pieces that spell out various words entirely with found imagery. In recent works she has disregarded letters in favor of abstract compositions on found paper. New forms are constructed from tenuous slivers of paper layered over book pages of flowers and various plants. The result is a meticulously crafted body of work that addresses natural beauty and fragility.

Currently Trending

Tim Berg & Rebekah Myers Large Scale Ceramics

 

Things fall apart, they break. Fracture, both material and metaphorical is a part of our lives. In the work of Tim Berg and Rebekah Myers, fracture acts as a unifying principle, unifying themes as diverse as luck, consumption and value. Sometimes something must be broken or fractured in order for us to see its value. This may be especially true for our environment. Only when we see the consequences of our actions do we begin to understand our complicity in fracturing it. So animals like polar bears must persist against the tide, fractured from their environment destined to become just another souvenir of a bygone era.

Sometimes we fracture things in search of something intangible, like breaking a wishbone for luck. These actions present us with an opportunity to conjure up some sense of control over the uncontrollable. We like to think we can control our fortunes through the coercion of objects or rituals hoping luck will favor us and blaming it when circumstances go awry.

Currently Trending

Joey L. Captures The Strange And Familiar Halloween Costumes Of Brooklyn’s Trick-Or-Treaters

Joey L Photograph Joey L PhotographJoey L PhotographJoey L Photograph

At just 24 years old, Ontario-born and Brooklyn-based artist Joey L. boasts an impressive portfolio.  Renowned for his diverse collection of portraits ranging from well-known celebrities to tribes encountered during his travels in Ethiopia, his work demonstrates “proof of an artist equally comfortable with the familiar and the exotic.”  In his annual “Halloween in Brooklyn” series, Joey L. documents the familiar—locals in Bushwick, Brooklyn—as they don their halloween costumes and transform into a different kind of exotic.

Capturing masquerading adults and trick-or-treating children alike, Joey began this series as a way to “view this local annual tradition through the eyes of a foreigner.”  Having heavily traveled and, thus, experienced the unfamiliarity of other cultures’ festivals and celebrations, Joey sought to engage with Halloween in a unique way.  Shooting each image in dreamy black and white and setting most of his subjects against a solid, black background, the eerie photographs are simultaneously dripping with drama and laced with playfulness—achieving the photograph’s objective to get “lost in a childish sugar rush of both home-made and store-bought pop-culture costumes of the year.”

Get into the Halloween spirit by checking out Joey L’s entire “Halloween in Brooklyn” series!

Currently Trending

Monica Cook’s Weird And Wonderful Drawings Explore The Revolting Side Of Humanity

Monica Cook - works on paperMonica Cook - works on paper  Monica Cook - works on paperMonica Cook - works on paper

Brooklyn artist Monica Cook is a woman of many talents, with multiple personalities and identities. She loves to explore the revolting, disgusting side of being human that we often try to hide. The range of her art practice is broad, and includes grotesque hairy sculptures, to highly detailed bizarre animations, meticulous drawings of naked women in surreal settings and beautifully rich oil paintings of slippery and slimy intimate scenes. Cook says all that she produces is in some way a representation of her, a kind of self portrait, or an attempt to digest the things about her that she doesn’t understand.

“When I’m painting, it’s more about my relationship with the object than it is about me. It’s hard for me to separate myself from the experience. It could be a fish or an octopus. I handle it until it becomes unfamiliar to me so I can see it in a new way. People might want to read into those paintings but for me, it’s just about finding magic in the mundane and exploring further.” (Source)

Her drawings are combinations of miniature versions of herself acting out strange activities on large body/landscapes. Her work usually explores the range of human emotions, including anything from girls on laughing gas in the middle of a doctor’s examination or celebrating some personal triumph while riding a balloon. Cook is able to exaggerate the awkwardness of being human, and how gross and disgusting it can be to live with flesh and bones.

“I can be extremely awkward, yes. I can be really shy, too. I put myself in a position where I am really uncomfortable interacting with something, and work with it until I become comfortable with it, and capture that private moment of surrender or acceptance. It’s all about private performance, and amplifying the absurdity of a situation – and making myself laugh.” (Source) (Via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

Preview: Jay Howell at FFDG

Next month, Jay Howell is having a solo show of 25 new works on paper at FFDG in San Francisco (“Enthusiastic Person”, opening February 1st, 6-9pm). Always excited to see what this guy is cooking up. Every new series he does seems to improve on the last without abandoning the sense of freedom and experimentation that makes his work so appealing. This will be Howell’s third solo exhibition with the gallery, and if you’re in the area, I definitely encourage you to check it out. Click past the jump to see more new character-filled work, and keep a look out for the artist’s upcoming animated series with Nickelodeon, “Sanjay and Craig”.

Currently Trending