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Paul Kooiker

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Photographer Paul Kooiker has a creepy little voyeuristic collection of work that is not only unnerving, but quite beautiful all at the same time. In this way, his work really stands out to me, it is observation perfected – maybe even surpasses to intrusive. This terrifying, and talented photographer doesn’t need gore to freak you out. He just needs the eerie-calm and the psychological imprint he leaves behind that has you suspicious of just who is standing behind you. I am going to have some weird dreams tonight…

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James Blagden

James Blagden

Brooklyn artist James Blagden isn’t worried about offending you with racial stereotypes. Or rather the aim is to offend to get the point across. Fusing together a myriad of influences and topics found in African American popular culture, the artist pokes fun at the ideas and images we accept on a regular broadcasted basis. Whatever the common conception, the nerdiness of Asians in mainstream cinema, African Americans and basketball, gold teeth and bling, he’s done it all. Check out an interview Format Mag did on James.

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Heike Weber

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German artist Heike Weber creates paintings and drawings by utilizing techniques of heavy repetition. Some of these pieces are purely textural, like the blue ballpoint pen drawings (after the jump), though I think the ones I like the best are in his “Kilims” series, which seem to reference Eastern calligraphic styles.

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Photographer Mads Perch’s Ethereal Light Projection Portraits Will Hypnotize You

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Mads Perch is a wonderful master of light. He not only photographs sensual portraits beautifully, but also can manipulate projections with finesse. Working mostly as a commercial photographer, Perch  together with art director Gemma Fletcher has become used to producing unfussy images quickly and efficiently. He has a sensitive style that would have no problem fitting in with the digital romantics.

This is a genre where artists are harnessing digital technologies in their search for the sublime: representing manifestations of Romanticism in the digital. (Source)

Perch does just that – his images are peaceful, ethereal, emotive and gentle. He evokes something very humane with the aid of different technologies. He says of his own work:

[My] photography encompasses clean, crisp, fresh and beautifully understated portraiture to more vivid imagery imbued with vibrancy, attitude and a healthy dose of color.

Perch’s choice of patterns and tones he projects are what make his portraits so enchanting. The blocks of greens and oranges caressing noses and draping over shoulders; the stripes bending around a gently tilted head; eyelids covered in technicolor plaid – these are what turn his subjects from something expected into something surprisingly celestial. Apart from these portraits, Perch has tried this method of projection on various buildings, structures and landscapes for an ad campaign in 2014. He has also photographed the award winning Klaxons ‘Surfing The Void’ album cover, and British rock group Clock Opera’s ‘Ways To Forget’ cover. All using a similarly clever and experimental approach to light and color. To see more of his beautiful work take a look here.

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Photographer’s Playful Series Captures People of the World And The Weights They Carry

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In 2012, Paris-based photographer Floriane de Lassée was in Ethiopia when she came up with her “How Much Can You Carry?” series. While there, she took notice of the varieties of weight that people would carry above their shoulders. Since Ethiopia, de Lassée has traveled to 6 other countries – Rwanda, Nepal, India, Japan, Indonesia, Bolivia, and Brazil – documenting an even more diverse array of humanity and its essentials. de Lassée says, “‘How Much Can You Carry?'” is above all a tribute to the bearers of life; those whose life is heavy and where smiles and laughter become the key to a livable existence. This series can be read on two levels. The first refers to these modern caryatids; the second, more secret, talks about various weights we all carry, whether physical or psychological (the weight of tradition, education, family, etc).” (via junk culture)

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John Vincent Aranda

 

John Vincent Aranda updates his website with a new series about immigration, sourcing imagery from comics from the Philippines and visually influenced by Pop artists like Roy Litchenstein.

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Carlo Van De Roer

These images are so damn soothing. Carlo Van De Roer’s uncomplicated yet sophisticated compositions calm my soul, in a contemporary-non-smooth-jazz Múm kinda way.

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Innovator Guy Ben-Ary Developed An Interactive Synthesizer From His Own Stem Cells

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Inspired by a childhood dream to be a rockstar and fueled by a “narcissistic desire to re-embody” himself, innovator Guy Ben-Ary has developed a synthesizer using his own stem cells. The project, titled “cellF,”  began with what the artist is calling a “new materialist” quandary: Through using both biological and robotic technologies, what sort of responses can one achieve “in regards to shifting perceptions surrounding understandings of ‘life’ and the materiality of the human body?” Or, in other words, how can one explore one’s biological selfhood via means of a technological interface? Or, even further, how can one “clone” oneself into a robotic entity? And, what does that mean for the purpose of the human body?

The machine acts as a “biological self-portrait,” a literal doubling of the artist that is meant to act and behave as Ben-Ary, using his own cells. After receiving the “Creative Australia Fellowship,” Ben-Ary was able to research and develop his project, which he divided in two parts; the first being to grow his own external “brain,” and the second was the development of the robotic interface that would interact with said brain.

To develop the brain, Ben-Ary gathered his cells through a biopsy of his arm. He then used Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell technology (iPS), a method that manipulates cells back into their embryonic state, which would allow him to “reprogram” the cells.

To development of the robotic interface, he created a machine that would serve as a real time feedback loop between itself and the cells. The robotic interface acted as a sound-producing “body” through an analogue synthesizer that is able to reflect “the complexity and quantity of information via sound.” When noise is fed to cellF, the cells then respond using the synthesizer and “perform” live. Pretty cool. (via The Creators Project)

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