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Carlie Armstrong’s Work Place

Carlie Armstrong’s Work Place site is  a fantastic ongoing documentary project documenting the work places of  Portland creatives. Whether it’s a painter, a musician, or designer, Carlie aims to not just understand the creative process but to also document the spaces that contain them.

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Ryan Lauterio

A nice mix of sculpture and painting on Ryan Lauterio’s portfolio site. My favorite piece is the above monorail. It looks like an ancient ruin from Disney Land.

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Leonardo Ulian’s Technological Mandalas Signify Worship of Technology

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Artist Leonardo Ulian offers another interpretation of  the mandala with his assemblages of electronic components, copper wire, and more. The intricate, finely detailed works radiate the innards of what makes technology tick. Ulian crafts smaller geometric patterns within a larger, more general shape that become more impressive once you see close up shots of his handiwork.

The mandala is typically a spiritual symbol that is often destroyed after its created (like the ones created from sand). This is a practice that establishes a sacred space, which is Ulian’s technological collage can be a metaphor for. Circuit boards, computer chips, and wire connectors have not only transformed the way we live, but the way in which we see the world. The artist could be saying that our dependency on it is akin to the worshiping of a larger being. (Via The Inspiration Provider)

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Takayuki Hori X-Rays Origami Animals To Highlight Pollution In Japan

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Origami is both impressive in its folded construction as well as its ability to signify the need for change by urging us to look beyond the paper forms. Animals are no doubt the most popular subject, and Japanese artist Takayuki Hori has a twist on the conventional foldings. He crafts these animals to appear as victims of Japan’s urban pollution, and the pieces expose the sad truths of what happens to these creatures. Hori showcases garbage in their insides using X-ray-like detail. If you look closely, you can see tiny bottles and other trash within the stomachs and ribcages.

These works appear in Hori’s exhibition Oritsunagumono (which means “things folded and connected”) which critiques the polluted coastal waterways and the effects they have on its inhabitants. Images are printed onto translucent sheets of paper and later folded into their origami shapes. The result are a ghostly tribute and haunting reminder of our impact on the environment. (Via Fast Co. Design)

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Life Of Cats: An Exhibition Exploring Japan’s Historical Obsession With Cats

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In the age of the internet, we are used to seeing cats, cat videos, and cat-related memes permeating our social media. But delve into the archives of art history and you’ll see that people have always been a little obsessed with cats (it was no secret in ancient Egypt). In a show held at Manhattan’s Japan Society last spring, over 120 artworks—consisting largely of ukiyo-e prints from the Edo period—were exhibited that explored Japan’s own infatuation with their feline companions. Most of the pieces were on loan from the Hiraki Ukiyo-e Foundation and the rest were gathered from collections around the US.

The show was divided into five sections: “Cats and People,” “Cats as People,” “Cats versus People,” “Cats Transformed,” and “Cats and Play.” The animals were represented in a variety of ways—sometimes in the cute, domesticated contexts we recognize from the internet, and sometimes in courtly (and even eroticized) scenarios. Many are anthropomorphized to partake in human activities, from argumentative social gatherings to traditional dances. In other prints, they take on a more sinister appearance, conjured as muses for cryptic samurai duals. Coupled with nude or reclining women, cats take on a sensual symbolism.

The exhibition ended last June, but you can learn more about it on the Japan Society website, and there is a video tour available here. (Via Hyperallergic)

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Pomme Chan

Experimental typography, playful illustrations, and a nice mix of hand drawn and digital wizardry by Pomme Chan.

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Yoshitoshi Kanemaki’s Abnormal Body Sculptures

Japanese artist Yoshitoshi Kanemaki’s Camphor wood sculptures show a wide variety of wondrous human abnormalities. From a nine headed school girl to a 20 something young man with his skeletal structure resting outside his skin, kanemaki combines surreal imagery and painstakingly precise carving to bring his figures to life.

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Jamie Baldridge’s 101 Fairy Tales

Lafayette, Louisiana based Jamie Baldridge’s love of stories dates back to a lazy afternoon from his childhood when he discovered a book entitled, “101 Fairy Tales,” in his grandmother’s attic. When Baldridge creates his interpretations of the fables and tales that he has implanted in his subconsciousness they emerge as very surreal and yet visceral photographs that walk the line between reality and fiction.

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