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Ted Lawson’s Eerie Sculptures Question The Meaning Of Identity

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Ted Lawson’s figurative work actualizes difficult concepts of physical identity. His work both strips individuality from his subjects while simultaneously forcing character through implications of the viewer, and therefore, complicating the very meaning of identity.

For example, in his piece titled, Eve, referring to the bible’s first woman, he depicts the cycle of a mutating female figure based on her weight. In this work, Lawson juxtaposes bodies with hanging flesh riddled with cellulite against ones simply constructed of skin and bone. The piece forces the viewer to formulate his or her own opinion of which body is the correct body. Or rather, which body correlates to which type of identity. When reflecting on this piece, the viewer is faced with his or her own interpretations of the same woman. It is then that a more interesting question is posed; does this piece prove that physical appearance identifies who we are, or, does it question the importance of the body— is our physical appearance, perhaps, arbitrary to who we are? Is this woman not the same woman in each representation?

The same questions are raised in his piece The Death of Narrative. There we find a naked woman laying, as if posing for a Renaissance painting, perhaps a Venus. However, instead of being surrounded in objects, hues, and sentiments that would then create allegory, this figure is encompassed with a pastiche of plastic objects. She is not grounded in space or time. She has no history, no narrative, and therefore, no implemented meaning. When observing a subjectless subject, one cannot help but to create purpose; it is human nature to understand through vehicles of narrative and history. Thus, by placing a being in a certain trajectory of non-meaning (the artist describes his work as existential), meaning is then inevitably created due to the human brain’s need for association.

Ted Lawson’s work constantly plays with identity not only through narrative, but also through the its relation to art history. His titles are always referential, if not playful. Even in the means by which he makes his work, sculpting through digital technology, is a manipulation of the tradition of his medium. Lawson’s work is a contemporary interpretation of classic quandaries, however, perhaps his work poses more questions, rather than attempting to answer. (via Empty Kingdom)

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Noriko Ambe’s Sublime Traces

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I know I’ve seen the book on the left circulating on all sorts of blogs, I had been wondering who’s work it was. Now I share the wisdom.

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Kelly Shimoda

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I guess you don’t want to talk to me anymore is the name of an ongoing project by photographer Kelly Shimoda. The project, published as a blog, consists of photographs of text messages captured on the phones they were received on. In these photos, we get a voyeuristic look into the lives of the sender and recipient, and are led to question the ramifications of this (fairly) new method of communication, in which the message is inevitably boiled down to its essence due to the 160 character length of an SMS. These photographs are a bit hard to read when shrunken down, so you can click them to view full size or check out the blog, linked at the beginning of this post.

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Beautiful/Decay Book Series- Please Read

Dear Cult Of Decay,

For those of you who just joined the cult and those of you who haven’t seen us in a while, we wanted to give you a refresher and keep you in the loop on all the changes we made since 2009.

As you know Beautiful/Decay started as a magazine featuring art & design. We had a traditional advertising model like most other mags on the stands. After publishing a successful 26 issues (issues A-Z) we decided to shake things up in order to bring you a superior product.

Starting in 2009 we re-launched Beautiful/Decay to have all the benefits of traditional magazine subscribership, while taking the form of an expanded, limited edition, more voluminous publication.

In keeping with the spirit of our independent DIY philosophy, we decided to break the mold of traditional magazines and change the way we do business. In this economy, most publications are either going out of business or watering down their content to appease advertisers. Rather than conform to the publishing industry’s new rules, we’ve decided to create our own business model that allows us to flourish and increase the quality of our content.

One thing we’ve always disliked about the mainstream print industry is that it can be wasteful. Newsstands throw away all unsold magazines, averaging a 40-60% waste rate. In keeping with our commitment to staying green, Beautiful/Decay will instead send issues straight into the hands of subscribers, rather than dumpsters.

Here’s what the new B/D looks like:

• No traditional advertising

• 50% increase in page count, meaning 164 pages of pure, unfiltered content

• Features now have double the page space, with more full-color images & articles

• Articles now run 16-20 pages, providing some of the most in-depth coverage of emerging artists available today

• Released in limited edition format of only 1,500-2000 copies, each one hand numbered.

• Each issue comes with a limited edition collaborative artist project ranging from inserts, stickers, posters, to original artwork.

• Presented in new format & size, including French flaps and multiple printing processes within

• Released 3 times a year (once every 4 months)

We’re looking forward to 2011, where we’ll keep doing things our way, innovating indie publishing and bringing members of the cult the best of art and design.

Long live The Cult Of Decay!

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Emil Alzamora

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Beacon, NY based sculpturist Emil Alzamora enjoys exploring the human form through his artwork. He focuses on ideas like what it actually means to inhabit the human body occur throughout his work in one shape or another.

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An Entire Kitchen Meticulous Covered In Colorful Yarn Knitting… Even The Food

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

Photo credit: ABC Southern Qld: Peter Gunders

This past year at Warwick Art Gallery in Queensland, Australia featured  a cozy site-specific installation called the Knitchen. As the name suggests, it was a kitchen adorned with knitting (some referred to it as a yarn-bombing). Yarn-covered chairs, sinks, coffee cups, and even a turkey occupied the space from July until August. This endeavor was the result of 50 artists working over the course of seven months. And, it shows. Nearly everything – from a phone cord to the label on a jam jar – is the result of a meticulous attention to detail.

Karina Devine, the Warwick’s gallery director told ABC Southern Queensland that the installation was inspired by an old-fashioned kitchen (hence the phone). “I got a new oven last year, and kept my old oven so I could wrap my oven,” Devine said. “The most exciting part for me was creating the crocheted gas flame, and hand sewing the orange flecks.That gives me a little bit of a kick every time I see it.” (Via Lustik and ABC Southern Queensland)

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Marck Fink

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A selection of amazing paintings by Marck Fink. There is something so playful and innocent about them… yet also something so dark. 

 

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Bue The Warrior Of Cute Graffiti

When you think of graffiti you don’t usually think of cute imagery but you got to admit that these super cute characters by Bue The Warrior are pretty engaging. Bue has circled the globe painting his joyous figures in all sorts of places adding a bit of joyous fun to the tough guy world of graffiti art. So we ask you do you think there is room in the world for cute graffiti? (via iheartmyart)

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