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David Maisel’s Mines

David Maisel’s aerial photographs of open mines questions  how human activity transforms land through industrial effort. Although beautifully photographed these images are reminders of how we destroy and pollute our planet for money and power.

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Lynda Benglis And 6 Contemporary Artists Sculpt With Paint

Lynda Benglis

Lynda Benglis

Lynda Benglis

Lynda Benglis

Laura Moriarty

Laura Moriarty

Margie Livingston

Margie Livingston

Lynda Benglis emerged decades ago as an artist breaking barriers and shifting paradigms.  Pouring neon paints in exhibition spaces served not only as an action on the figure of the artist, but while these pieces created installations, the poured paint was also viewed and handled by Benglis as an object, and preserved as such.  Years later her poured paint artworks are preserved and installed in their original format- which presents a transformative dynamic that the artist established.

Paint has historically been used to create imagery on a foundation- canvas, wood, paper, etc.  In this common format the paint becomes an object of art only after joined with a substrate.  Benglis was a forerunner in breaking away from this.  Today there are a number of artists pushing forward on this notion, and breaking away further in the development of their bodies of work.  Artists Linda Besemer, Margie Livingston, Ryan Peter Miller, Laura Moriarty, David Allan Peters and Leah Rosenberg all create works that demonstrate the vast spectrum with which paint as a medium has been torn from the substrate and presented conceptually and physically as a substance that can be molded.

Margie Livingston recently presented a new body of work in her solo exhibit “Objectified”at Luis De Jesus Gallery in Culver City.  Having spent years casting and sculpting paint, Livingston’s portfolio demonstrates an evolved investigation into forms and space, substance and the function of the object.  In her newest work she casts and sculpts acrylic paint alone into slabs that appear as wood planks, the patterning of hues reminiscent of wood grain.  The wood-like planks, sheets and stumps are then used in the formation of minimalist sculpture.

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Tony Orrico’s Drawings Test The Limits Of Physical Movement

tony orrico performancetony orrico performancetony orrico performanceTony-Orrico performance

Since 2009, Tony Orrico has performed his Penwald drawings. Combining elements found in dance, theater and performance art, it explores repetitive movement for long periods of time, bringing drawing’s motion into peril with human physicality. The idea originates in finding a point when an act becomes more than just motor skills and crosses over into the creative process. In Tony’s case, this leaves an aesthetic mark on physical existence in the form of an abstract drawing.

After graduating with an MFA in Choreography from the University of Iowa, Tony joined Shen Wei and Trisha Brown Dance companies. As a principle, he performed in major cities around the globe, including Sydney Opera House. Both troupes known for an avant garde approach ensured that he was never far away from a serious art practice. When he was ready, this enabled him to use the experience he learned as a dancer and combine it with his passion for drawing. One of his first Penwald performances at Postmasters Gallery, NY in 2009, would set the stage for everything that followed. From there, he received an opportunity to perform at The National Academy Of Sciences in Washington DC, and  was soon taking his “Penwald” series to venues worldwide. He was one of the few selected to reappropriate performances from Marina Ambramovic’s retrospective, “The Artist is present” at New York’s Museum Of Modern Art, an experience he was honored to have.

His newest project, CARBON, further investigates the relationship between material, body and movement.  Again, testing the limits of physical, mental and creative capacity, Tony sleeps in a box of graphite broken off throughout the course of a day, from Mexican pottery bowls. The material is used as a metaphor for life and death. A few recent highlights include performances at The Metz-Pompidou, New Museum, BAM, and solo Exhibits at PPOW Gallery NY, MUAC Mexico and Shoshanna Wayne Gallery Los Angeles.

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Andrew Hall’s Photographs of Liquid in Motion

Cool series from Los Angeles photographer Andrew Hall. Dubbed “Liquids in Motion”, these pictures take a whole lot of motion and capture it forever in one fluxed-out moment in time. He experiments with all kinds of colors and types of liquid in the photos, from thick, viscous greens, to inky, watery blacks. I want to see a large print of quite a few of these. More “Liquids in Motion” after the jump. (via)

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Jenna Gribbon

Jenna Gribbon, Self-portrait as an Isomniac

Jenna Gribbon’s paintings parse and reorganize images “not (into) natural spaces, or dream space, but waking brain space.”  Psychologically loaded, I find it hard to figure out what is going on, but I can’t look away either.  Jenna worked as an assistant to Jeff Koons, maybe laboring on some of his billboard sized photorealist paintings is where she got some of her chops.

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Mia Christopher’s Luscious Paintings

Mia Christopher lives and works in San Francisco, CA. Her vivacious paintings are executed in an intuitive manner with a wide variety of materials. Latex, glitter, eyeshadow and more are utilized to create luscious abstractions that immediately storm the viewer. Equal parts exuberant and grim, the dichotomy of her work derives from innermost feelings that are poured out to each surface as a way to communicate and promote personal exploration.

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Michelle Muzyka’s Memories In Decay

Check out Michelle Muzyka’s Memories In Decay installation consisting of ultra detailed cut paper sculptures.

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The Incredibly Sad Spaghetti Monster Of Artist Theo Mercier

Theo Mercier - Spaghetti, Installation

Theo Mercier - Spaghetti, Installation

Theo Mercier - Spaghetti, Installation

Internationally renowned artist Theo Mercier has created an incredible monster of a sculpture made entirely of spaghetti! This textural, monumental piece is around 10 feet tall, and that’s when it is sitting—which is all the time. The spaghetti monster sits upon a small chair that is way too small for him as he stairs sadly down at the ground. Titled Le Solitaire, or, “The Loner,” this creature looks isolated and alone in a world where he is the only spaghetti-creature. Although the colossal sculpture seems very melancholy, Mercier’s work tend to not be without a bit of humor. A monster made of spaghetti is an absurd and silly creation, so why is it so glum? Maybe it is afraid that us humans will eat his spaghetti!

Mercier’s work is often large and textural, as Le Solitaire’s tactile spaghetti-skin begs to be touched. The noodles form an endless series of lines bending and forming across the body of the creature. They imitate scribbles of continuous lines doodled on a piece of paper. A self-taught artist, Mercier is an expert at inducing strong emotions with such a bizarre and surreal sculpture. We cannot help to feel sorry for this dripping, sorrowful beast. Its wide, striking eyes that stare directly at the viewer are also in other works for Mercier’s. His other installations include funny creatures made by adding these same bright eyes onto cars, piles of hay, and even smoke seeping out from a fireplace. This French artist’s unusual and mysterious sculptures give inanimate objects such emotion and personality that steal our hearts and earn our love.

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