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Carolin Reichert’s absent presence

"Fake Fridays"

"Fake Fridays", 2007

Carolin Reichert’s work deals with an inventory of the human memory as triggered by situations, encounters and objects referring to and rooted in the past, yet recurring and manifesting themselves anew in the present. She is interested in exploring the individual’s perception of reality and the role and capacities of memory and recollection within that process. The images portray brief moments, belonging to the past, frozen, re-framed and deliberately transported to their new context, with which they are at odds or incompatible, therefore ultimately dealing with the attempt, possibility and implications of visualizing ‘absent presence’.

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Eske Rex’s Drawing Machine

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Its difficult to say whether the drawings or the machine is the work of art here.  Artist Eske Rex created the Drawing Machine which in turn produces ink drawings.  Two pendulums are attached to an arm which is equipped with a ball point pen.  Once the pendulums are set in motion the arms record the contraption’s movement by creating a singular work of art.  Beyond each piece’s pleasing aesthetic is something just as intriguing.  In a way, each drawing documents a very specific movement and time.

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Diddo Velema

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With over 12 years of experience, designer and art director Diddo Velema has worked with a diverse range of clients, such as LABORATORIVM and Modernista!. Having taught at the School of Arts in Utrecht, Netherlands, and having contributed to various international projects like Frank Gehry’s Sentosa and UNESCO’s ICAT project in Costa Rica, Diddo just recently started up his own studio in Amsterdam. He aspires to blur the boundaries among art, design, architecture, fashion, photography, product design, etc. as often as possible. And he does it so phenomenally!

 

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Private Photo Booth Moments

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Charlotte Niel’s series Behind the Curtain captures the moments before, during, and after patrons’ engagements with carnival and fair photo booths. These photographs are light and fun, bright and summery. Photo booths have consistently been a place of discovery and wonder, a place to experience the excitement of pulling a curtain behind you to allow some privacy in the midst of a very public setting. In a culture where so much of our photography experience is digital, and the tangibility of the photograph does not seem to be as privileged or common as it once it was, the photo booth is a place that offers this immediate experience. I particularly enjoy the variety of color in these photographs and Niel’s captures of the bottom halves of the photo booth’s subjects. There’s a sense of mystery and curiosity that these images evoke, and I think that largely has something to do with the merging of these private moments in a public setting captured with a public eye.

Of her series, Niel explains, “How many times have we looked at an old photograph and wondered about the person in the frame? People or family members we never knew, set in places we never visited or that have changed beyond recognition. Photos are often the only means to link us to our past or the past of others. They help us not to forget. They become visual memories. For these reasons, I find it fascinating to watch what happens at photo booths at county fairs. People come with family and friends to celebrate anniversaries, birthdays, friendships or just to make an annual visit to the booths. For others, it is just a way to capture who they are or with whom they are at that moment, on their own private stage. The result is a body of work of people who shared with me moments that took place in front of and behind the curtain, documented for unknown viewers. With my camera, it became a transformation of a private moment into a public one.”

Charlotte Niel lives and works in San Francisco.

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Beautiful/Decay Book 1: Supernaturalism Video Preview

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We finally received the long-awaited advance bound copy of Book 1 and we are thrilled with how it looks.

We made a virtual video tour so you can get a sense of how the book will look! Click the link above to preview it. Just a reminder, there are only two weeks left until the July 1st deadline to reserve your copy. We’ve had an overwhelming response (especially since each book features a unique piece of artwork from featured artist Kyle Thomas) and supplies are very limited. So, to ensure you receive this special inaugural copy, please subscribe as soon as possible.

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Beccy Ridsdel Dissected Ceramics

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 Beccy Ridsdel, a UK based ceramicists makes an interesting and truthful (to some) statement:

I know we all have our own opinions, but I think craft is technical and art is meaningful (or a reason for being made, beyond the thing itself). Overly simplistic? Probably, but for ceramicists this can be a big issue as ceramics is almost universally seen as craft regardless.

Ridsdel poses an interesting question here, one that not many contemporary artists are asking themselves simply because we are living in a world were art, for the most part, is conceptual. But what happens when someone like Ridsdel, who has the ability to make pottery, or plates, in this case, wants to make her craft both functional and a conceptual art piece?

I chose to make a series of definitely craft objects – bone china plates, mugs, jugs – and ‘dissect’ them.

Here, Ridsdel presents to us an interesting series of ceramic pieces that shows both her craftsmanship but also her creative thinking process. These endearing and fun plate and tea cup sets allude to something more than just eating and drinking. While still remaining functional, the cups and plates work as a signifier that brings to mind ideas of surgery and cosmetic alterations. This concept is ingeniously embedded within the multi-layers plates, and the surgical tools placed near them. (via Colossal)

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Lee Yun Hee’s Beautiful And Unique Ceramic Pieces Inspired By Literature And Story Telling

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South Korean artist Lee Yun Hee creates narrative ceramic pieces inspired by literature and story telling. She uses both Western and Eastern influences, creating a style of her own that is striking, unique and undoubtably contemporary. Her work is fragile and flawless, almost creating an aura of effortlessness. She uses her work to reflect upon stories of everyday people; their struggles, fears, hopes, and anxieties. Yet, most importantly to her, she is truly interested in documenting their “cures” — the sort of “up from below” type stories that end with a protagonist who has had the strength and endurance to overcome a difficult task. For example, her piece La Divina Commedia, reinterprets the classic 14th century poem by Dante. In her version, she depicts a young girl’s search for truth. She explains the tale behind the piece in an interview with Brilliant 30. She states,

“there was once a girl that received an oracle, telling her future. The knowledge, the predestined desire and insecurity left her troubled. In search of happiness and peace, she embarked on a journey. Along the way, she encountered many obstacles; but at the end, she discovered the peace she has been striving for…By overcoming anxiety and suppressing desire, the girl reaches a state of ultimate peace.”

Her work acts as windows into her own version of a fairy tale; she is able to re-create morality stories within her own framework.  She refers to her self as a collector— she takes influence from everything she sees. She explains, “I have been keen on collecting images since I was a child. I would rather cut out the pictures from cartoons than read them. Even the encyclopedia wasn’t safe. These processes have had more influence than anything else on my background as an artist.”

Lee Yun Hee’s work is mystical and fantastic. Though balancing modern, classic, Eastern, and Western styles, she has creating an epic body of art that is honest, profound, and truly unique.

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Superoboturbo

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The boombastic Superoboturbo illustrations remind me of how excited I used to be when I saw monkeys on television. I used to be obsessed with those little fuzzy guys, and I’m beginning to swoon for this man’s work the same way. His controlled pallette and friendly line-weight make for a rambunctious duo that make it hard to pull my eyes away.

Also, he recently broke his leg so maybe send him a nice note or a little work to help cheer him up/pay the medical bills at: info@superoboturbo.com

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