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Heidi Voet’s Carpets Made Out Of Watches

Heidi Voet lives and works in both Brussels and Shanghai. She creates sculptures based on minor alterations that comment on society and history. In 2010 and again in 2011 she produced large “Tapestries” made with thousands of digital watches. Presented as carpets these physical fabrics of time are vibrant representations of household staples. Maya Kramer explained one work in an article entitled ‘Beautiful because it is brief‘ stating that “Is six afraid of seven/ ’cause seven, eight, nine/ I’m about to lose the pieces I find is an elaborate carpet woven together from over four thousand, multicolored watches all set to the exact time. (…) at intervals throughout the day, the watch alarms simultaneously ring in a symphony of digital chimes. Over the course of the exhibition, the watches will inevitably malfunction, losing their synchronicity and eventually sounding like an out of rhythm and out of tune orchestra. Thus, as the title of the work implies, the march of time is subtle yet unceasing and its cumulative effect results ultimately in dissolution and increased chaos.” (via)

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New Paintings by Adam Friedman Challenge Perspective, Glorifying the Mystery in Nature

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Adam Friedman celebrates the unchanging mystery of nature in his surreal, hybrid paintings that dissect landscapes from the real world. His newest body of work is bold in color and line, as he portrays scenes of glorious mountains and unwavering glaciers. His unique style depicts scenes of tremendous natural beauty, transformed them into something even more stunning. Plates of the earth seem to shift and glaciers are mirrored in a reversed world that Friedman so skillfully creates. The artist experiments and warps perspective in his paintings, like an M.C. Escher drawing toying with our mind. Sections of mountains are divided and manipulated into geometric patterns and shape that make you question exactly what it is you are looking at. Friedman describes his artwork’s intent.

“Millions of years are compacted into a single instant and rocks become fluid. I strive to present a moment that defies human intervention in the landscape, and pays homage to the potential in the inexplicable.”

Friedman explains that his work celebrates the unknown that the natural world possesses. Society attempts to explain, examine, and make sense of our environment, but there are some things we cannot understand. The beauty in the unknown can be felt in Friedman’s powerful series that radiates with intensity. Mirus Gallery in San Francisco, California currently has a solo exhibition of Friedman’s work on view until July 11th. If you have the chance to see this exhibition, titled Into the Aether, make sure to check out his compelling paintings in person.

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Paul Nathan Captures The Strange World Of Creative Dog Grooming

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Chances are that you’ve probably never seen a dog made to look like Disney’s Pluto. Well, it exists. Photographer Paul Nathan captured the odd world of creative dog grooming in his series (turned book), Groomed. It features professional groomers who use semi-permanent hair dyes and blowouts to style pets. Last year, Nathan traveled to Intergroom, one of the largest international dog and cat grooming conferences, and documented dogs that look like leopards, flamingos, and even people.

Groomed is strange, unexpected, and even shocking if you’ve never seen a dog made up like this. It might seem a bit cruel to subject these animals to this type of star treatment, especially when it comes to coloring their fur. The photographer explains in an interview with Feature Shoot that the priority is to make sure the dogs are comfortable. “In most cases the colors are done in stages on different days, usually in sessions of no more than three hours with plenty of breaks for the animal.”  He states, later adding, “There is a vast variety of hair coloring products for dogs. They are all non-toxic and semi-permanent. Depending on the kind of coat the dog has it can last from a few washes to a few months.

With that off your conscious, you can focus on how amusing these dogs are. They represent a relatively unknown subculture in grooming, and it’s only at events like Intergroom where groomers flex their creative muscles. They are responsible for their designs and take pride in them. And, the campy fun doesn’t end there –  the people are often dressed to match the dogs they’ve styled. (Via Feature Shoot)

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Guillaume Reymond

This stop-motion animation of Tetris is just one part of French-Swiss artist Guillaume Reymond‘s project Game Over. Guillaume has also directed Space Invaders, and Pong! I haven’t heard anyone mention Pong in a long time.

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Luke O’Sullivan

foundation2 Luke O’Sullivan’s 3D work is like walking straight into a pop up book. He uses screenprint on wood to create some amazing 3D landscapes.

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Vally Nomidou’s Paper Figures

 

Vally Nomidou’s series of life-size sculptures are all made of paper and depict young women and young girls. The female figures impress with the naturalness of their features and poses, the perfection of modelling and the beauty of volume.
Paper, Nomidou’s dominant material, now becomes a key component in her creative process, inextricably linked to painful and systematic research on the technical level, as well as on that of aesthetic integration. The artist respects her material and, although it is cheap and vulnerable, she does not “adulterate” it by using other materials. Moreover, she does not use it as a shell, an encasing to cover a necessary inner structure by providing a fake, idealised skin. Nomidou builds and shapes her works from the inside out solely using paper and paperboard. The internal cardboard frame is built with a vertical and horizontal grid in order to be able to support and render stillness in her sculptures, while also ensuring balance in  contraction and expansion. The homogeneity of her material allows the equilibrium in the behaviour of the interior and the exterior, and thus ensures its duration.
Regarding her technique, the perfect rendition of facial features, of expression, of the naturalness of pose, of body proportions, is based on a process of combining partial plaster casts, the meticulous observation of an exhaustive photographic documentation of her sitters and a painful processing of the outer skin. The perfect prints are synthesised, cut, sewn, glued, rubbed, and through the mastery of her touch achieve the fully realistic rendering of her sitters.

 

 

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Los Angeles Zine Fest- This Weekend!

 

As many of you know Beautiful/Decay was started in 1996 as a black and white zine. We may have gone full color and grown in distribution but at the core we’re still a DIY operation that holds true to all of our original zine roots. That’s why I was so excited to hear that a group of talented LA creatives had put together the LA Zine Fest taking place this Sunday (2/19/2012). Dozens of past B/D featured artists are taking part and they have some great panels (including our pal Katie from Synchronicity Space and Henry Rollins)  lined up for you to enjoy. I just wish I had known about it sooner so we could have taken part in some way. Perhaps next year!

I’ll be heading down to check out all the DIY goodness and I hope you will too. Watch a promo video for the fest after the jump!

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Ryan Humphrey

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I am sure the mop-topped quartet known as the Beatles might not necessarily appreciate Ryan Humphrey re-appropriating their  their classic 1964 album cover for heavy metal (tears of blood and Slayer, to be exact), but I do. This reminds me of posters I made for our practice space in Hollywood a few years ago, which was sort of similar but the Fab Four had Kiss facepaint on, and were more in their go-to-India-psychedelia era. Other gems? Judas Priest’s seminal album “Screaming for Vengeance” emblazoned on a gay pride rainbow flag.

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