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Aaron Dunn Carves Portraits Out of Poured, Drippy Piles of Paint

 

Diggin’ Heads, an aptly titled series from Baltimore-based artist Aaron Dunn. From the artist:

Heads is a series of carved paint pour(traits). It’s my likening of artists to Doctor Frankensteins, and a contemplation of what we might owe our work if it lived and breathed. Heads began as a parody of macho chest-thumpers like Pollock and Koons, but grew into a joyful exploration/recontextualization of the possibilities of ‘traditional’ painting media: this includes the physical incorporation of paintbrush bristles/handles and other hardware into the work, as well as poured, dissected and dripping paint in all kinds of messy 3D applications.

Really creative process and it seems to be working out well too- the works are definitely bee’s knees material. See more after the jump, including Dunn’s take on Homer Simpson.

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Sepe

A number of new mixed media illustrations by Polish street artist Sepe out of Warsaw who just exhibited with Intoxicated Demons.

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Gregori Maiofis’ Darkly Humorous Tarot Cards Satirize Human Existence

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Fool, from the Deck of “Public Sanitation”

Gregori Maiofis, Tarot Decks - Photography

Lovers, from the Deck of “Butterflies”

Gregori Maiofis, Tarot Decks - Photography

Justice, from the Deck of “Obscene Enjoyment”

Gregori Maiofis, Tarot Decks - Photography

Empress, from the Deck of “Taxidermy”

Gregori Maiofis is a Saint Petersburg-based photographer who stages elaborate scenes that illustrate the follies and mysteries of human existence in ironic and fatalistic ways. Many of his works are based around literary and philosophical traditions, such as proverbs and fables. This particular series, created in 2003-2004, uses tarot cards as its theme, pairing dark and absurd imagery with written titles to humorously encapsulate a facet of life and/or identity. The “Fool” card, for example — the prototypical image from a deck Maiofis imagined would be called Public Sanitation — depicts a man in a ludicrous bird costume as he prepares to jump off a roof. The “Empress” card — traditionally signifying fertility, femininity, and beauty — displays a taxidermied primate. Much of his work is produced via the bromoil process, a challenging photographic process that was popular in the early twentieth century that involves ink being painted over a black-and-white photograph printed on bleached paper. Maiofis’ resulting images have both photographic and painterly qualities, appearing historical and artifactual while satirizing human existence on a trans-generational, cross-cultural scale.

Born in Russia into a family of artists and architects and further trained in new art practices in Los Angeles, Maiofis fuses his international experiences into works that explore the strength of the image to overcome boundaries of nation and culture. While those knowledgeable about Russian history, identity, and traditions may have specialized insight into the significance behind Maiofis’ dark and clever imagery, there is still a lot of meaning left for the rest of us to identify; the figure of Justice — usually depicted as a stately figure — is naked and blindfolded, straddling her double-edged sword in a sexual manner, satirizing (perhaps) the representation of justice as a “fair” and purely objective entity. What makes Maiofis’ images so mysterious and intellectually engaging is that their meanings are never directly provided. It is up to us to divine their significance (as well as their playful, biting critiques of humanity) just as we would interpret our own lives with real tarot cards.

More of Maiofis’ clever and thematic works can be viewed on his website.

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Pae White’s Rover Momentum

Pae White often uses graphics and decals in her works and she has produced a series of graphic treatments, unique to each vehicle, entitled ‘Rover Momentum’, using an interpretation of the dusks and dawns of the countries represented at the Fair. Her designs create a striking and dynamic ‘vehicle’ for the Fair as the vehicles move across London during the days of the exhibition. 

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Mark Dutcher

Steve Turner Contemporary will be exhibiting Mark Dutcher’s works February 14th- March 21st in a show entitled, “Havilah.” Havilah is taken from the mountain community in Northern Kern County that has a rich mining history- once a city of abundance and big dreams, Halivah is now a sleepy ghost town off the beaten path. I like this concept. The works themselves don’t necessarily reflect the title directly, but I like them for their vibrant colors and controlled messyness- plus they use feathers!

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Cleverly Designed Sustainable And Interactive Food Packaging By Tomorrow Machine

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This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. - A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. This package is made for oil-based food.

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. – A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. This package is made for oil-based food.

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. - To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax do no longer protect the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water.

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. – To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax do no longer protect the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water.

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This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package.

Swedish design studio Tomorrow Machine experiments with unusual materials to create revolutionary food packaging concepts. Pursuing the modernist principle of form follows function, Tomorrow Machine unites visual appeal with highly innovative and operational technologies to create both aesthetic and pragmatic design.

Their project This Too Shall Pass addresses the increasing issue of environmental pollution and recycling. Using biodegradable materials, studio has created food packaging that shares the symbiotic life span with the food housed inside. Vividly colored and minimalist in shape, these concept containers for oils, dry foods and liquids disintegrate when the contents they store are used.

“Is it reasonable that it takes several years for a milk carton to decompose naturally, when the milk goes sour after a week? “This Too Shall Pass” is a series of food packaging were the packaging has the same short life-span as the foods they contain. The package and its content is working in symbiosis.”

Besides their environmentally friendly attempts, Tomorrow Machine creates interactive product packaging to shape the innovations of tomorrow. Collaborating with Swedish research company Innventia, designers created self-opening and self-expanding packages based on the use of the 100% biodegradable material they developed together. According to Tomorrow Machine, “this is the new generation of sustainable package design, using materials that are both smart and environmentally friendly”. (via Packaging | Uqam)

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Walter Schels’ Haunting Photographs of People Before and After Death

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At the end of life: a camera lens, desperately recording and archiving the fears of the dying. For the series Life Before Death, the photographer Walter Schels captures the terminally ill in anticipation of the unknown and again in the moment after death. These intimate portraits are the last of a lifetime, documenting the body after some ineffable human essence has vanished. Informed by the words gathered in interview with the subjects by Schels’s partner Beate Lakotta, the haunting shots imagine the invisible, giving form to the most unconquerable human fear.

Schels’s portraits, in their silvery black and white tones, are reminiscent of Victorian post-mortem photography, presenting the dead as if sleeping, their eyes closed and brows gone slack in seeming comfort. These images are poignantly juxtaposed with the interviews, conversations in which even the most mundane, peripheral things of daily life are assigned significance; beside wizened and terrified eyes and coupled with existential wonderings are thoughts on fridge-freezers and local football teams. The banal works against and in service of the tragic; when confronted with death, a burial site and a cup of coffee are equally potent reminders of our mortality.

At the turn of the 20th century, it was believed that the eye recorded the last sight seen by the dead, that with careful study of the ocular nerves, we might reconstruct the moment of death. Schels’s subjects, pictured with gleaming eyes and contained within unrelentingly tight frames, seem to stare into the viewer as they confront inevitable passing, as if to implicate us or to say, “You are the last thing I saw.” (via The Guardian)

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Jiha Moon

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meticulously fluid paintings by Jiha Moon. Most of Jiha’s work depicts classic asian landscapes with lush brushstrokes that at once look like clouds and debris floating through the air and a tip of the hat to abstract expressionism.

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