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Satan’s Mask

Satan as a headless-masquerade holding ghost on an abandoned island floating in the deep, dark void of space creating life from clay and striking them down, all in front of tiny children. Yes! Amazing excerpt from a stop motion version of Mark Twain’s Mysterious Stranger, by Will Vinton. Censored from many TV stations. Yes!

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Mark Robinson’s Moody Mixed Media Works

 

Recent Manchester University grad Mark Robinson uses folklore narratives as a jumping-off point for his moody mixed media works. Robinson’s paintings, which contain visceral, almost spontaneous textual elements, serve as an outlet for his various frustrations and impressions. I like his flat use of color and black. And the piece directly below the jump, a silhouetted cowboy/bandit figure done in blue, suggests a good sense of texture. Definitely some interesting stuff from this young artist.

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Lily Morris

Lily Morris is an emerging artist based out of Brooklyn, NY. Detailed and yet distorted, her paintings depict foggy but seemingly familiar scenes that require squinting eyes and conjure a feeling akin to driving somewhere remote in the pouring rain.  Her style fluctuates between washy layers of oil and solid photographic realism. Subjects and objects are caught exploding, describing the very instant an action occurs- the horrifying moment before perception intervenes and untangles what just happened. Morris’s paintings recount these inexplicable, fleeting moments of confusion and lay them out in raw and compelling fashion. 

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Tsherin Sherpa’s Contemporary Twist On Tibetan Thangka Paintings

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Tsherin Sherpa, born in Kathmandu Nepal, originally trained as a traditional Tibetan thangka painter with his father Master Urgen Dorje. From the age of twelve, he underwent six years of intensive training before travelling to Taiwan to study Mandarin and computer science. Since then he has returned to thangka painting but has added a contemporary twist to the traditional paintings leaving behind the traditional confines of the age old practice. His work now mixes the techniques and imagery of thangka with contemporary subject matter.

When asked about breaking from tradition Sherpa states:

“Sometimes if one gets too obsessed with the rules, there’s a danger of getting entangled in that very obsession.  We then become more concerned about not breaking the rule. Because of that, from the traditional art’s point of view, the contemporary work with Buddhist imagery may even get categorized as sacriligious. I am working with some of the images that are viewed as the ultimate portrayal of certain deity. And to manipulate it, is obviously taboo.

However, if we scratch the layer a little deeper, and analyze these Buddhist images, one will find that they are a means to develop a practitioner’s (Buddhist) goal towards enlightenment, which means that the images are not the ultimate goal but rather a vehicle. A representation of a Buddha in 2- or 3-dimensional form is not the actual Buddha. It is a mere representation. And to fall into the trap of perceiving them to be the ultimate, is actually getting oneself entangled with the rules.”

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Pearl C. Hsiung

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LA based artist Pearl C. Hsiung paints out-of-this-world scenes that are just breath taking. It’s almost like you are entering a surrealist realm.  A lot of her work incorporates heavy use of spray paint and stencils. Her latest series, Never Ends, will be showing at the Steve Turner Contemporary later this year. It will show case her newest painting, installations, and video art.

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Johan Scherft’s Unbelievably Realistic Paper Models Of Birds

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These incredibly realistic birds are not alive – surprisingly they’re only paper models.  In fact, artist Johan Scherft out of only paper, glue, and paint.  He models each bird’s unique shape on his computer than constructs and paints the rest by hand.  While the fold-and-glue-tabs model provides each bird with their distinctive body shape, the realism is in Scherft’s careful painting.  He says of the painting, “For this part, I take the most time. With very fine brushes, I try to achieve the most realistic effect in color and detail. I use watercolors or gouache paint. It’s always an exciting moment once the template has been painted to assemble the bird and see what the result is.”  [via]

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Penny Byrne Sculpts Detailed Porcelain Figures Embedded With Irony And Dark Political Messages

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Penny Byrne - Porcelain

Penny Byrne - Porcelain

Penny Byrne - Porcelain

Penny Byrne is a Melbourne-based artist who creates porcelain figurines laden with bold—and often grim—political messages. We featured her earlier work in 2013, which delved into slavery, the war in Iraq, and dolphin slaughter. Her more recent pieces follow along similar themes, unpacking violence through images of militarism and animal cruelty, while also focusing on more specific topics such as the Occupy Movement and the conflict in Syria.

What makes Byrne’s work both shocking and persuasive is the clash of a domestic medium with a charged topic. Wounded, disfigured, masked, or strangely ironic, the figurines embody narratives of pain, suffering, and hypocrisy that resonate with the viewer on uncomfortable and visceral levels. Porcelain dolls are usually treated as the coveted relics of a sensitive, “non-violent” culture, locked away in a glass case as objects of delicacy and curiosity. The fact that they are blooded, armed for war, or marked for plastic surgery creates an incongruity that subversively transforms the figurines’ object-status into social, political critiques.

Byrne’s exhibition list is impressive, including the The Fine Art Society in London and Fehily Contemporary in Melbourne. Her new work “Hurt Locker,” an armored figurine made of Murano glass and mild steel, is currently being shown at the Venice Biennale exhibition GLASSTRESS, which runs until November 22nd, 2015. (Via Sweet Station)

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Livia Marin Ceramics Melt Away Into Beautiful Puddles

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Artist Livia Marin’s Nomad Patterns is a series of classical ceramics depicted in a most unconventional manner. Her representation of the destruction of ceramics is fascinating in the sense that she has chosen to use melted ceramics rather than breaking, chipping, or shattering them in the way they are known to do. In this sense, she has brought a sort of silent, unconventional destruction to the ceramics in her series.

The fascinating aspect of her work lies in the way the ceramics are being destroyed. She merges the ideas of “care and ruin” by making it difficult to distinguish whether the ceramics are being destroyed or put back together.The fluidity of the melted ceramics and the way that the patterns are maintained add a touch of surrealism to the series. The physically impossible nature of her project as well as the aesthetic aspects of her work make for an original merging of physics and art.

In this sense, her work reaches beyond its artistic capacities and underlines the artistic aspects of physics as well as the merging of science and art. Marin’s work merging of the notions of restoration and destruction also provides a reflection on these two notions, which are, in her work two sides of the same coin.

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