Get Social:

Doing Chores 20 Feet above the Sidewalk

Artist Angie Hiesl‘s site specific pieces blend installation and performance.  Her X-Times People Chair series elevates senior citizens to traffic-stopping heights.  Hiesl installs a steel chair on the fascades of buildings about ten to twenty feet off the ground.  Performers typically between sixty and seventy years old perch themselves on the chair.  The perching senior citizens perform mundane daily routines such as reading the paper or folding clothes for the duration of the perfomance.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Goodbye Puppy Lover, Kate!

Kate

Not only has Kate bequeathed copious amounts of love and affection on Mr. Zigglez, our lil hard-workin’ B/D office mascot (which makes her good in my books) she has won all of our respect here at B/D for her amazing bit-mapped B/D graphics, lovely blog posts, and sharp as nails design sensibility! We will miss you terribly Kate. We were not so sure, seeing as your boyfriend Matt interned here first and is a very hard act to follow. Just kidding! We were sure you would totally be better than him. Just kidding! We love you both equally. Thanks again! Check out Kate’s amazing design portfolio here and view some of her works after the jump!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Seductive Lolitas Comment On Society In Kazuki Takamatsu’s Paintings

kazuki-takamatsu paintingkazuki takamatsu paintingkazuki takamatsu paintingkazuki takamatsu painting

Like a seductive cloud of silky smoke, Kazuki Takamatsu’s lolitas dance on the brink of adolescence and adulthood. Using a technique called depth mapping which is similar to the 3D effect seen in video games such as Zelda, Takamatsu hand paints pixels in a monotone palette of black and white. The effect plays tricks on the eye allowing it to see multiple shadows, similar to holograms in the figures of dainty nubiles. His vision transforms them into living spirits.

Takamatsu says his Lolita subjects are all based on the average Japanese girl. In their likeness, he comments on good and evil, society and history. In barely there clothing, these pretty young things clutch guns, cities and swords. It’s a strange dynamic to use such a beautiful aesthetic to comment on war and violence. In places, it comes off a bit disturbing because it tends to take on a very objectified view of young women. But this is the tradition of manga, considered a high art form in Japan.

Manga is a series of comic books originating in Japan. They are read by all ages but seem to be especially popular  among teenage boys and girls. The stories deal with typical subject matter; romance, action, adventure, horror, sports etc. There are however, more underground forms of manga where homosexuality, incest, transgender and pedophilia are discussed freely. Besides Japan, Europe is the second largest consumer of manga and the U.S. is a close third. (via hifructose)

Currently Trending

Lauren Pelc McArthur’s Painting Turned Into Collage Turned Into digital art

Lauren Pelc McArthur  is a multi-disiplinary artist from Toronto,Ontario currently attending the Ontario College of Art and Design. Through a back and forth process of collage, painting and digital art she explores the inter-connectivity of modern media and technology along with science fiction influenced concepts of the assimilation of technology, pop culture and the human form.

Currently Trending

Yonca Karakas Constructs Meat-Filled Creepy Dreamscapes

Yonca Karakas- Photograph

Yonca Karakas- Photograph

Yonca Karakas- Photograph
Yonca Karakas- Photograph

Turkish photographer Yonca Karakas used to want to be a genetic engineer due to her attraction to the idea of cloning. Somewhere along the line she became a photographer instead, but this fascination with mass produced identities is all too present within her work. Her work, which is polished and waxen, features symbols and people styled, and nearly de-stylized, to look mute and plasticine.

Karakas utilizes symmetry to her artistic advantage. She manipulates framing by organizing her props to dramatize the exploitation of whatever symbol: meat, or the cross, she is working with. Her characters are emotionless; colonized by the future, they are clean, well groomed, and the antithesis of squeamish. They wear meat, their religion is sugar coated. When thinking of her work, she recognizes that she is in the business of constructing dreams:

“I don’t like to define every frame I shoot or say ‘that is exactly what I tried to tell’. Once it’s all done that’s when I think why I shot it, I go back and say I might have been influenced by this or that movie. And by going back I can see my concerns and try to solve them. The Box is influenced by Ray Bradbruy’s novel Fahrenheit 451. It’s about a despotic future in an oppressive community where books are burnt by firefighters, televisions broadcasting brainwashing shows. I believe we are more or less facing the same situation now. We are burying ourselves in our tablets and phones, looking at ourselves and making others watch us too. It’s like we really like that, don’t we?”

(Excerpt from Source)

Currently Trending

Nishio Yasuyuki’s Giant Women

I’m loving Nishio Yasuyuki’s massive sculptures of women. They are bizarre grotesque shrines to to horror films and nightmarish manga stories.

Currently Trending

Documentary Watch: Stronger

Following David Patterson, a personal trainer and competitive regional bodybuilder, this documentary delves into the sport of bodybuilding. We are guided into the world where only the strongest survive and the only the committed make it. With many, many wins under his belt over 34 years David discusses how building a body with weight training is both an art and a sport. Watch the full documentary after the jump.

Currently Trending

Andrei Bouzikov’s Heavy Metal

Andrei Bouzikov’s gore filled illustrations can be found on your favorite metal band album art such as Municipal Waste and Cannibal Corpse.

Currently Trending