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Yo Shimada’s Post-It Note Structures

Designer Yo Shimada of the firm Tato Architects built this structure in conjunction with students from the Kyoto University of Art and Design.  The entire wall is made of post-it notes – 30,000 cells of post-it notes.  The brightly colored sticky notes are stuck together to create individual cells which are then stacked.  The installation exemplifies both innovative design and architecture.  Using a simple material, Yo is able to create a relatively large and sturdy artful structure. [via]

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Larissa Haily Aguado’s Hand-Crafted Collages In the Digital Age

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Given the prevalence of new technologies and the endless possibilities associated with digital programs, it is no surprise that most contemporary artists working in collage seldom create works entirely by hand. To Argentinian artist Larissa Haily Aguado, however, fabricating collages manually has become an integral aspect of her practice, as “the possibilities of fixed manual collage in the digital age provide exciting opportunities to engage with craft, materials, analysis and outcomes.”

With mesmerizing compositions, dream-like subject matter, and a “sharper, more immediate, and more human dynamic than is possible with computer software,” Aguado’s collages combine photographs, illustration, found materials, and elements of graphic design to form surreal yet seamlessly cohesive scenes. By attaching inanimate objects to human bodies or placing retro furniture in scenes of nature, Aguado creates works that are both tongue-in-cheek and aesthetically appealing.

Representative of her wide range of artistic experiences and clearly influenced by her multi-faceted career (including major music industry projects, fashion campaigns, movie poster designs, and TV commercials), the diverse nature of her collages undoubtedly conveys her inventive imagination and eye for design.

Check out Aguado’s work in Collage: Contemporary Artists Hunt and Gather, Cut and Paste, Mash Up and Transform, a new book by Danielle Krysa (aka The Jealous Curator), on shelves now!

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Mike Tanis’ Dramatic Abstract Paper Forms Crafted Without The Help Of Glue

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Philadelphia-based artist Mike Tanis produces intricate paper sculptures using a combination of origami and kirigami techniques. If you’re not familiar with what those are, they’re Japanese art forms that  fold and cut paper in complex ways without the help of glue. Here, Tanis has used these methods to create abstract structures that appear soft and wavy as well as splintered and fractured. Sometimes, it’s hard to tell that they’re made of paper.

Tanis tells Quanta Magazine that he uses a scalpel to make any cuts and doesn’t use directions or crease patterns. “I start with a folding technique or principle and improvise once I start to feel the 3d form developing,” he explains. The results are dramatic forms that are reminiscent of architecture and nature. His taller, cut-paper structure mimic skyscrapers while his completely-folded pieces conjure images of the beach or a mountainscape.

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Stefano Galli’s High Speed Photographs Capture What It’s Like To Be A Cowboy

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Within his series Cowboys, Italian born artist Stefano Galli captures the essence of the rodeo. When encountering Galli’s blurred displays of fast paced moments, at first glance, the images almost take on a painterly aesthetic. The blended earth tones enriched by small marks of what could be cadmium red mimic the sort of guttural intensity found in Abstract Expressionism. Yet, with further inspection, it becomes clear that these moments are, in fact, not abstract at all. Galli’s series displays a hyper specific sensibility of the rodeo — they go beyond what is physically there and take on the challenge to document both the visual and psychological affect the rodeo has on these cowboys. With a crowds of faceless faces, bucking broncos whose warped bodies begin to take the formation of something out of a Francis Bacon painting, and long, lingering lights that possess a cinematic feel, Galli is able to represent the true element of movement. His photographs are a clever answer to create a discourse on a challenging topic for a motionless medium: speed. But, more importantly, his images provoke not only a discourse on gesture, but also on control. What does it feel like to have control when all sense of homeostasis is disrupted? How does one remain in control? And further, through the distortion of the image, is Galli provoking the viewer to lose his or her control? Are we asked to let go of our need to make sense of what we’re seeing? Perhaps, for a moment, we should act on instinct. Delicate yet powerful, Stefano Galli truly exposes a contemporary visual thought process on an age-old tradition.

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Far Out Digital Work and Collage by Lesser Gonzalez Alvarez

 

Lesser Gonzalez Alvarez, of Baltimore, produces sculpture, collage (see above), and illustration. But the majority of his fine arts output is done through digital media. His digital compositions aren’t really like any I’ve seen before. They combine a far out, cosmic sensibility with soft, colorful gradients and textures. I could meditate on these for a while. Some of Alvarez’ works are so simple, yet they maintain a lot of gravity, as though they hold something really important just beyond your grasp. And the creepy smiley faces he repeats throughout his work really get to me. Click past the jump for more collage, couches floating in space, and a workbench installation.

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Tim Prince and his Forgotten Boneyard Recall Little Shop of Horrors

Forgotten Boneyard is the 100% real animal bone work of artist Tim Prince. In addition to the one-of-a-kind handcrafted creatures in bone, Prince offers a growing selection of wet specimens through Etsy. To me the real standout of the entire collection is Audrii muscipula (pictured above), an homage to Audrey II, the carnivorous plant from 1986’s Little Shop of Horrors made of mink vertebrae/scapula, box turtle shells, a skunk skull, coyote teeth, and raccoon mandibles. A mouse skull and other bones decorate the soil.  

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Li Hongbo’s Flexible Paper Sculptures That Abstract As They Pull Apart

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Li Hongbo – Pure White Paper from Dominik Mersch Gallery on Vimeo.

Chinese artist Li Hongbo’s sculptures are quite bizarre. Walking up to them you may think that they are made out of delicate porcelain but as you examine it further you’ll see that it in fact is made out of thousands of sheets of paper manually glued together. As you pull the paper apart the figures twists, turns, bends and abstracts creating stretched out imagery that is at once horrifying and exquisite. (via)

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Theo Jemison & Kiel Johnson

 

While Kiel Johnson constructed an entire magnified twin lens camera out of cardboard (which actually works, amazingly but not surprisingly), Theo Jemison artfully captured the endeavor on another medium, film. It’s more than just a time-lapse video, it’s beautiful and captures the fun and tediousness that was involved in making this gigantor camera. Click here to see photographs the camera actually took! They’re eerie and gorgeous, just in time for Halloween.

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