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Eiffel Tower Rip-Offs

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The Eiffel Tower was built in 1889 and by the very next year it had several admirers in neighbors across the channel.  Some saw the potential of a similar tower, a “Great Tower for London”.  These illustrations are part of a catalog of competitive designs for the proposed tower released the following year.  Some are hilariously derivative of the still brand new tower.  Others, on the other hand, seem to belong to some sort of Victorian space-age.  Regardless, in a strange way all of the designs seem to point to the importance and uniqueness of the original Eiffel tower, even at this very early age.

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yvette mattern’s Global Rainbow

Global Rainbow is a large scale, spectacular outdoor laser projection created by the artist, Yvette Mattern. It consists of seven parallel beams of high specification laser light, representing the spectrum of the traditional seven colors of the rainbow, and is designed to be projected across large open sites, particularly densely populated areas. With the projection, the artist intends to encompass geographical and social diversity in its reach and symbolize hope. (via)

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Patrick Bergsma’s Sculptures Of Inverted Tree Houses Look Like Post Apocalypse Relics

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Patrick Bergsma - Sculpture
Patrick Bergsma‘s sculptures aren’t your childhood’s tree houses. Though they embody the whimsical architecture that a child might dream up, they also feature urban decay: rusted cars, broken down buildings, overgrown houses in disrepair. The trees seem to spring forward, like next-generation dwellings that have survived a nuclear apocalypse.
Bergsma’s sculptures also play with physics, sometimes featuring an inverted house underneath the roots of a large, gnarled tree. The barren branches loom over tiny figures that sit beneath them, as though they’re contemplating lives past or lives lost. In a way, the trees almost seem to depict a life that an urban dweller might hope for: a simpler life in the outdoors, free from worrying about busted pipes or rent or the other responsibilities of caring for a permanent dwelling.
There’s a peacefulness to Bergsma’s work. It asks us to imagine ourselves somewhere else and shows us that, even when we’re thinking about watering the lawn or fixing the shingles, we’re still a part of nature.(via I Need a Guide)

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Street Artist No Touching Ground Depicts Social Conflict In Greece, US, And Worldwide

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Traveling all over the world, street artist No Touching Ground wheat pastes compelling imagery amidst various cities architecture that adds depth to the context of our time and place. Recently, in Greece, he posted work concerning their social political climate under the title “Ingredients Of An Uprising”. In one of them, an Axe body spray bottle, re-worked to say “Anarchy for Him” floats over other graffiti on a busy street.

No Touching Ground creates a nearly optical illusion as his work is so photorealistic that it blends into its surroundings in an uncanny way. He began by working around images of animals from the wild, and people dressed up like animals. His work has since become more political, ranging from symbolic elements indicative of social tensions, to portraits and quotes of protestors met at a demonstration. In Seattle he voiced many of the emotions surrounding the tragic death of John T. Williams at the hand of a Seattle police officer. His work is aesthetically lush and important for our social consciousness.

A rather mysterious artist, No Touching Ground has work all over the world. Alaska, Seattle, South America, Europe, and now Greece, there is no saying where his work will show up next.

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One Bit Increment launched their site!

One Bit Increment

My friends at One Bit Increment (design firm started by UCLA alum Camile Orillaneda and Leon Hong) launched their site last week and it’s amazing. The homepage is a fully interactive game complete with sound effects featuring the lovable ox character (in One Bit land they’re called “moo”) traversing a stretch of pleasant mountain side. The imagery is incredibly complex (mind you, it’s all made out of paper) and yet sweet and simple at the same time. Please visit the site and leave them a nice comment or two!

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Warren Thomas King

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Warren Thomas King describes his work as “Brococo,” a combination of his interest in Rococo styling and the modern day bromance. If for some reason that doesn’t make perfect sense to you, from what I can gather, Brococo translates into paintings of dudes with crazy facial hair. You know, like jack hammer beards and mustaches shaped like space shuttles. These guys may not be mild-mannered Watercolor’s usual house guests but that’s what makes them awesome.

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James Oses

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Mr. James Oses is a UK freelance illustrator. He works on location, sitting himself down where he pleases, and, using his steel-nib dip pen and ink, captures the streets of London. I love the active line quality of his illustrations – somehow he embeds a dynamic that makes me believe the image is a still from some animation reel that will, at any second, begin playing.

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Inka Mathew Matches Tiny Found Objects to Pantone Color Chips

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Designer Inka Mathew has created an ongoing project of matching tiny objects to Pantone colors, then photographing her matches with the color chips used as backgrounds to the found object. Dubbed “Tiny PMS (Pantone Matching System) Match,” Mathew finds the corresponding Pantone color for things like small toys, flowers, candy, and cereal before posting the results to the project’s Instagram and Tumblr feeds. Describing the idea for the project, Mathew says, “One morning, when I was looking around to see the plants in my front yard, my attention was captured by these intense bright blue little flowers called Veronica Georgia Blue. A question popped in my head, ‘I wonder what PMS color is that?’ The design-geek in me urged me to pick a bloom and try to find a matching Pantone color for it. It was PMS 2726.” After posting her initial photograph to her personal and work Instagram account, her followers requested more Pantone pairings, and since then, Mathew has been keeping her eyes open for curious or sentimental objects to match.

For other Pantone-inspired projects, check out Angelica Dass’ chromatic inventory of skin tones, David Schwen’s food pairings, and Emilie de Griotte’s edible colors.

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