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Stephen Orlando Records Motion In Light To Stunning Effect

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando - Photography

Stephen Orlando uses LED light to track all sorts of movements from recording kayaking, canoeing, whitewater kayaking, swimming, and other sports. The images of paddle sports are stunning, like light skipping across water as a stone does. It’s fascinating how regular the strokes can be, but the most interesting are when they’re over uneven waters and the kayaker had to compensate. The pink, purple, and blue traces that are particularly nice because you can sense the slow stroke of the canoe paddle. The reflections of the light in the water are quite surprising as well.

Orlando explains his interest in recording these motions in light:

“I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph. Using LED lights with custom color patterns and long exposure photography, I’m able to tell the story of movement. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.

My photos focus on motions in nature and in urban landscapes, as well as human movement. I am inspired by the works of Étienne-Jules Marey, Anton Giulio Bragaglia, Gjon Mili, and Frank Gilbreth and their pioneering techniques.” (Via Colossal)

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Christopher Janney Bathes Travelers With Sound And Technicolor Light

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Christopher Janney’s work often activates multiple senses simultaneously, using both visual and auditory stimulation to evoke emotional responses to viewers. Calling it a ‘sonic portrait’ of Miami, his work Harmonic Convergence combines sound, light and interactive elements to emulate a positive experience of place in an otherwise sterile airport environment.

Located in a pedestrian walkway leading from the car rental buildings to the airport proper, Janney replaced the existing windows with a prismatic arrangement of colored glasses. Columns and design elements were also repainted white, to better catch the sun’s lights streaming through the colored glass. This was Janney’s second installation at the airport, succeeding his previous piece, Harmonic Runway.

Like most of his work, sound plays an important part of this installation as well. According to Jenny Filipetti at Designboom, “Speakers installed at regular intervals along the walkway create a continuously changing ‘sonic portrait’ of South Florida as they play the sounds of tropical birds, thunderstorms, and other environments native to the region. Video sensors at either end of the passageway track visitor movement, causing changes in the density and composition of the sound piece relative to the number of passengers in the space.” (via designboom)

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Alex Fischer

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Toronto-based creator Alex Fischer seems to prefer images laden with layers. Each image screams with a smashing of cultures and a tearing of borders. Fischer questions ownership in a similar manner to Richard Prince. Each image shows patience with a strident attention to detail, as each pressing of images goes further and further into a world all its own.

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STRANGE/LOVE

POVevolving Gallery

939 Chung King Road

Los Angeles, CA ~ 90012

Reception:February 12th, 2011, 7 to 11pm.
Closes: March 12th, 2011

Preview of the show after the jump.

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Tim Mantoani Shoots Portraits Of Photographers Holding Their Most Iconic Images

Tim Mantoani - Photographer

Steve McCurry

Tim Mantoani - Photographer

Barbara Bordnick

Tim Mantoani - Photographer

Lyle Owerko

Tim Mantoani - Photographer

Jim Marshall

In December 2006, American photographer Tim Mantoani embarked on a unique and fascinating project to document living photographers with their most iconic images. Since then, he has collected over 150 portraits, ranging from the historic to the contemporary, the cultural to the political. Included among the vast series is Harry Benson and his famous photograph of The Beatles engaged in a pillow fight (1964), as well as Lyle Owerko holding his devastating image of the 9/11 attacks on the Twin Towers (2001). All of Mantoani’s portraits are taken on the “rare but mammoth format of a 20×24 Polaroid,” using a large camera originating from the 1970s (Source). Only a handful of these Polaroid cameras still exist (you can learn more about the devices he uses here). Mantoani’s reasoning for using such unique, classic technology is rooted in a respect and passion for the photographic tradition; as he explains, “If you are going to call the greatest living photographers and ask to make a photo of them and you are shooting 35mm digital, they may not take your call. But if you say you are shooting 20×24 Polaroid, they will at least listen to your pitch” (Source). As further homage to these artists, as well as their impact on the history of photography, Mantoani has had everyone write a story about their iconic image on the bottom of their portrait.

Mantoani’s project is simultaneously intimate and historically significant. It is an undeniably powerful experience to see the faces behind photographs which have defined cultural eras and signified shifts in social consciousness. So often, despite the impact of their work, photographers remain the unseen observers while framing the world in profound ways. We don’t often have the opportunity to connect with the mind and personality behind the lens. Mantoani’s work crystallizes these important artists in the records of photographic history. Suddenly, with the Polaroid and its accompanying, hand-written inscription, we can imagine Steve McCurry in 1984 in the midst of the Soviet War in Afghanistan, capturing the face of Sharbat Gula (“Afghan Girl”), who would wordlessly tell the world an intimate story of hardship and perseverance. In regards to an iconic moment in the history of American music, Jim Marshall’s portrait shows us the face to which — for an intense, fleeting moment — Johnny Cash held aloft his middle finger. These portraits bring the bodily, human presences back into the images and their associated histories.

In 2012, all of these stunning portraits were compiled in the book Behind Photographs, published by Channel Photographics. The book is available in multiple formats, including a regular edition, a slipcase limited edition, as well as a cloth-bound deluxe limited edition that comes with signed collector cards. It is also available as an eBook. The print versions are available for purchase on Mantoani’s website. More photographer portraits after the jump. (Via 123 Inspiration)

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B/D Cover Artist Shirt Sneak Peek

 

Jesse Auersalo is a London based graphic designer and illustrator who was recently featured in Beautiful/Decay Magazine Issue Y, and contributed the issue’s cover.  We loved the design so much that we decided to create a t-shirt from the iconic cover. Here is a photo of “Clown,” the as-of-yet unreleased shirt!

Jesse Auersalo’s work is at once haunting and seductive; rather than reinforcing the likeness of his subjects, he purposefully complicates and obscures their recognizability. His cast of characters features a plethora of bizarre veils—whether bandannas tied over faces, helmets covering heads, taped shut sweatshirt hoodies, or even Halloween-style fake gag noses, as shown in this t-shirt. They appear like a ramshackle gang robbing your home with makeshift masks. Perhaps this is what simultaneously lends Auersalo’s works an irresistible sense of intrigue and unavailability to the viewer.  Jesse himself has noted: “You normally want to get what you can’t have. It’s the most common way to tease and to make itself attracted. Even the most boring secret can reach everybody’s curiosity if it’s well wrapped and hidden.”

You can’t get your hands on this design just yet but keep an eye out for it when it debuts in March for our 09 spring collection!


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A Sound Art Installation Powered By Cigars

Ronald van der Meijs Ronald van der Meijs

Dutch artist Ronald van der Meijs’ “Play it one more time for me La Ville Fumée” is a sound-art installation that works on hand made cigars and refers to the history of Eindhoven city, when it was one of the largest cigar-producing cities of Europe. At that time the city was also called ‘La Ville Fumée’. The installation is in many ways about nature versus culture. The technique used here has an almost machine like character, that is controlled and monitored by a natural and traditional item: the hand made cigar. Because each cigar has its own strength by the natural and traditional way of making, they all have their own fire rate. It is precisely this fact that the installation is not working in a predictable way but rather relates to a more or less natural rhythm. The installation has 4 tuners each control a recorder by means of pistons containing the hand-rolled cigars. There are 4 different recorders: a bass flute, alto, tenor, and a soprano. The pistons with the cigars and the recorders are both controlled by 2 abstract lungs. This sound-art burning cigar installation can be seen as a tribute to the former tobacco industry of Eindhoven city and its thousands of workers and craftsmen. The sound composition is a requiem for the former cigar production industry of Eindhoven. (via)

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Stéphane Vigny’s Playfully Subversive Installations

The work of Stéphane Vigny is often humorous in its subversiveness.  Vigny often undermines the purpose of objects to create amusing but thought provoking new ‘purposes’ (like a BMW turned into playground equipment).  Other times Vigny alters objects in a way that make them profoundly useless (such as a chair on wheels the size of the room it sits in).  Commodities and inanimate objects are typically entirely defined by their purpose, what they do.  Vigny’s installations, though, force viewers to set aside their expectations and approach the familiar in a new way.

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