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Celeste Byers Illustration

Celeste Byers is currently an Illustration major at Art Center College of Design and has some really kickass work.  We used to be roommates together so I can say first hand that this girl works really hard, loves what she does and is going to to be famous. Keep an eye out for her!

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Zim & Zou’s Incredibly Intricate And Colorful Paper Sculptures

Zim & Zou - Sculpture Zim & Zou - Sculpture
Zim & Zou - Sculpture Zim & Zou - Sculpture
French art duo spectaculaire Zim & Zou create dazzling paperscapes that are full of lush colors and imagination. With intricate snips and folds and other sorts of wizardry, they bring to life a series of candy-colored dreams populated with a flock of birds of a multitude of hues: sizzlingly bright red, rich bronze and gold, and aquamarine. There are no dull spots in the land of Zim & Zou: theirs is a technicolor wonderland that is fully and brightly realized.
The detail in their work is incredible, making their paper birds almost look like mechanical nightingales. Other denizens include a bright orange and navy lobster that looks like it’s been gift wrapped and a spider fully decked out in metallic splendor. It’s not just the natural world that gets an unnatural makeover: A neon machine, delightfully mysterious, stands in a spot marked by caution tape. Its bright colors pop and it promises all kinds of treats and cotton candy concoctions that are simply out of this world.
It’s amazing that Zim & Zou’s works are all entirely handmade. According to their bio,
“Their favorite material is the paper they’re cutting, folding and gluing to give rise to intricate and colorful sculptures. Paper inspires them for its versatility, infinite range of colors and unique textures. The flat sheets turned into volume are giving an installation the poetry of ephemeral material.”

(via Hi-Fructose)

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More work from Richard Mosse

Richard Mosse

Irish photographer Richard Mosse who brought us the amazing photos from Saddam’s Palaces has updated his website with an amazing body of new work – lonely and abandoned mechanical beasts stranded where they don’t belong.

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B/D’s Best of 2010- Cut Paper, Part 1

Peter Callesen, "Fall", 2008

Peter Callesen, "Fall", 2008

You might have already read our series on food artists. B/D has decided to feature another 3-part series on cut paper artists! The art of paper-cutting evolved from the traditional Chinese craft, stretching back to the 6th century. Today, contemporary paper artists have pushed this art-form into focus once again. Armed with their X-Acto knives, (and nail scissors?), these artists have redefined the meaning of intricate. (Some actually believing they’ve only completed a day’s work once their hands shake with fatigue, waking up sore the next morning!) Though it can be frail, finicky, and prone to tearing, their choice of medium is deliberate; they’ve claimed paper as a way of using an ordinary material to express themselves in unconventional ways. Check out the three cut paper artists of the day!

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Akiko Ida & Pierre Javalle

Picture 2

Married couple, Akiko Ida & Pierre Javalle, use their culinary, photographic, and miniature figurine making skills to create an endearing body of work where food become recognizable landscapes. Not quite the equivalent of my dream for mountains of blueberries, but close enough!

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John Vincent Aranda

The Modern Lovers "Roadrunner"

“I’ll Miss You Tomorrow” is the title of a new project by London-based photographer John Aranda. His photographs are paired with songs by the likes of Brian Eno, Kate Bush, and Devo to enhance the narratives present in each medium. More info about the project can be found here.

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Mark Escribano

 

Los Angeles based photographer Mark Escribano’s portfolio covers a wide array of subject matter from provocative nudes to strange mustached dudes. 

 

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Rebecca Morgan’s Exotic Redneck Portraits & Stylized Peasants

Rebecca Morgan creates a collection of characters and types, a cross between Brueghel’s stylized peasants, R. Crumb’s winking harlots, “Deliverance”, and the inbred mutants of many a horror flick. Morgan takes her background in rural Appalachia as the point of origin for her personae – as they become uncultured tourists, or especially in her self-portraits, expatriate interlopers ambivalently negotiating their depiction. Morgan’s more exotic rednecks inhabit a rural America where people exist intimately and potently with the wilderness, a relationship which urbanites can only smirk at and envy. Nature is either wistfully idyllic – the idyl found in a margarine ad – or the scene of demonically perverse debauchery.

Morgan’s style fluctuates between hyper-detailed naturalism, reminiscent of Dutch painters such as Memling and Van Eyck, and cartoonish caricature, which pushes the imagery to a ridiculous, repulsive, even absurd dimension. Jagged teeth, furry brows, corpulent bodies symbolic of sloth and over-indulgence, and a general air of dirty unkeptness all exploit the demonization of the Appalachian. Internal traits come to the surface, and while Morgan exorcizes her country folk’s demons, ridicule mixes with pride and defiant celebration. In her alternately tender and aggressive depictions of herself, she bares all – a metaphoric exposure of her former rural character, or to prod the viewer to question their own position.

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