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Pieter ten Hoopen’s Photographs Of Exotic Lands In Turmoil Are Raw And Powerful

Pieter ten Hoopen- Photograph Pieter ten Hoopen- PhotographPieter ten Hoopen- PhotographPieter ten Hoopen- Photograph

Swedish photographer Pieter ten Hoopen has worked within all aspects of photography, from journalism to commercial. At this point in his career he is a well known and distinguished photographer: he has received many prestigious awards, amongst them the Photographer of the Year in Sweden, and the World Press Award; he has published books of photography on Tokyo and Stockholm, and is currently working on a film project about Hungry Horse, Montana, through MediaStorm.

Ten Hoopen shoots mainly on a Nikon but also uses Yashica box cameras and a Widelux. He has worked all over the world, and travels out of known safety to deliver raw and emotionally jarring footage from places far away, many in turmoil. In the past, he has worked in Pakistan, composing images from the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake, an intimate glimpse into the pain and hardship as families continued digging through rubble in search of buried survivors. He shot the small village Vladimirskoe, Russia, which, lying next to the mythically invisible town of Kitezh, occupies a strange grey area of being juxtaposed next to a national attraction while being invisible and struggling itself; problems with alcohol and unemployment make life difficult for most of its inhabitants. In Japan, ten Hoopen visited a forest that lies below Mount Fuji, known informally as the “suicide forest,” where, yearly, nearly a hundred people travel there to commit suicide. The forest is dense with vegetation and stands on the remains of a volcanic eruption, making compasses completely useless and getting lost in the woods very easy. People tie ropes to trees to prevent themselves from getting lost, and many go in there with the intention of never coming out.

There is a stillness in his images, the composition forms its own poetry, and the emotional charge of the situations he encounters stand squarely in the frame. Within the same vein of documentary photography as Sebastião Salgado, ten Hoopen brings an unprovoked sense of art to the frame; providing a visual means with which we can connect to these feelings as viewers, even halfway across the globe, even never having stepped out of our own country. That is the most powerful aspect of this kind of a photographer, he gives voice to what he witnesses, and brings forth the unexplainable beauty and devastation that words cannot do justice to.

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Jim Goldberg’s Powerful Series “Rich & Poor” Reveals The Dichotomy Between The Affluent And Destitute

USA. San Francisco, California. 1977. "My life is personal, but I will tell you one thing I'm too fat."

USA. San Francisco, California. 1977. “My life is personal, but I will tell you one thing I’m too fat.”

USA. San Francisco. 1981. Untitled. Goldstines. "My wife is acceptable. Our relationship is satisfactory." Edgar G "Edgar looks splendid here. His power and strength of character come through. He is a very private person who is not demonstrative of his affection; that has never made me unhappy. I accept him as he is. We are totally devoted to each other. Dear Jim: May you be as lucky in marriage!" Regina Goldstine

USA. San Francisco. 1981. Untitled. Goldstines.
“My wife is acceptable. Our relationship is satisfactory.” Edgar G
“Edgar looks splendid here. His power and strength of character come through. He is a very private person who is not demonstrative of his affection; that has never made me unhappy. I accept him as he is. We are totally devoted to each other.
Dear Jim: May you be as lucky in marriage!” Regina Goldstine

USA. San Francisco. 1977. "I love the picture. I am a homosexual. May be if I send one of the pictures you gave me, Jim, to my nephew he will understand how hard his uncle is struggling."

USA. San Francisco. 1977. “I love the picture. I am a homosexual. May be if I send one of the pictures you gave me, Jim, to my nephew he will understand how hard his uncle is struggling.”

From 1977 through 1985, Photographer Jim Goldberg took documentary-style pictures of transients in the Mission District and well-off San Franciscans in their homes and had the subjects write on their portraits. The combination of text and image is still incredibly intimate, even in this age of Instagram and Facebook. The dichotomy between the affluent and the destitute is obvious, yet the universality of the emotions the writers share is striking: pain, loneliness, disappointment, joy, security, contentment.

“I think my outrage about the desperation of the poor — and the dissatisfaction of the rich — stemmed in part from my belief that they represented a derogation from that path, a veering off course that had to be rooted out and documented.”

The combination of image and text is what makes this series so arresting and raw, but at the time of its initial publication in 1985 it was a radical decision, derided in a New York Times review as “a sad lack of trust on Mr. Goldberg’s part in both the power of his photographs to speak for themselves and in his viewers to understand them without comment.” Contemporary artists such as Brandon Stanton from Humans of New York, have taken this format and breathed new life into it through its immediate dissemination on the Internet.

Out of print since 1985, Jim Goldberg’s Rich and Poor has been completely re-designed and expanded by the artist for Steidl. Available for the first time in hardcover, Rich and Poor builds upon the classic combination of photographs and handwriting and adds a surplus of vintage material and contemporary photographs that have never been published or exhibited. (Source)

What comes across in these images is the shocking discrepancy of material goods and environments. The writings expose an expanded truth, though. There is obvious inequality in education and writing ability, leading to the impression that the poor suffer more than the rich. And that may be true in some ways — lack of opportunities, healthcare, and hope are all devastating. Pain is pain, though, and suffering is universal, as is love and gratitude. These portraits—touching, tender, hopeless, and sad—speak to our commonalities, as relevant in 2014 as in 1985.

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Woolly Pocket Presents: Andy Goldsworthy

British Artist Andy Goldsworthy is a master of ephemeral work, capturing the beauty of nature and tempering it with the fleeting nature of all organic things. Each one of his works is a collaboration with nature, and with each piece he strives to gain a closer understand of nature through these intimate interactions. Using his hands and “found tools,” Goldsworthy’s work is a celebration of the world outside the buildings that humans spend their lives inside. His photographs capture the sculpture moments after they are complete, afterwards the sculptures live on changing with the wind, rain and elements until it ceases to exist as Goldsworthy shaped it.

Such is the nature of the Woolly Pocket. Woolly Pocket allows the urban dweller to manipulate nature and incorporate plants into formerly inhospitable territory. Woolly Pocket can take over a wall, fence, living room or any structure and make you the sculptor of your surroundings. Our favorite aspect of Woolly Pocket is their Woolly School Gardens project that connect schools looking to start a garden with community members looking to support their efforts. Help kids get their hands dirty by visiting Wolly School Garden and find a school near you to sponsor.

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Laurent Impeduglia

Laurent Impeduglia

Laurent Impeduglia‘s paintings are full of surreal landscapes and scenarios, giving the viewer plenty of opportunities to explore and find something new every look. Using almost child-like illustrations, one point perspective and playful color schemes, the paintings and drawings are enjoyable and portray very expressive environments.

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Josh Reames

 

Not only does Josh Reames write great reviews for New American Paintings and run an odd little basement gallery in Chicago (Manifest Exhibitions), but he makes great paintings too! I’ve personally seen his paintings come a long way in a very short time, and I hope you like them as much as I do. See this young Chicagoan under-compensate for his long-comings after the jump!

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Onesidezero

sleepsphere

Brett Wilkinson’s experiments in minimalism and geometry have led him to create Onesidezero, a collection of his latest works in illustration. Whimsical and playful, his style reflects the cheerful shapes and colors of childhood toys and coloring books. Not only does he specialize in prints, but his works are also featured on mugs, laptop skins, and wall vinyls. Wilkinson has also designed for Panasonic and the Big Chill Festival 2009, and created the cover for Digital Arts Magazine.

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Gabriel Schama’s Intricate 3D Laser-Cut Carvings

Gabriel Schama - Sculpture Gabriel Schama - Sculpture Gabriel Schama - Sculpture Gabriel Schama - Sculpture
Artist Gabriel Schama demonstrates that lasers aren’t just for starships: He uses them to carve out incredibly intricate designs and patterns from materials such as wood, paper, and even leather. His works come alive with “surreal textures” that create a kinetic feeling, the kind you might get from studying a Magic Eye poster. There’s also the structural element, which lends his artwork literal depth as they seem almost excavated, blooming into mandalas and swirls.
The cool thing about Schama’s work is that it’s clearly informed by the natural world, some sporting the same frills as aquatic flowers and others looking like any garden-worthy blossom. There’s also a very rigid manmade feel to his work, though, not just in the precision with which he carves them but in some elements of his designs that look almost retro-futuristic chic.
Schama’s art is evolving, growing from his early hands-on approach that used mixed-media materials. In the description of his second Kickstarter project, he says:
“I have long been possessed with a desire to make my work bigger and more intricate at the same time. A modestly sized cut paper piece could take me weeks of nonstop work to execute. This project is not only the next step forward stylistically, but a means to achieve far more daring and exciting projects.”

(via Hi-Fructose)

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Buddy Nestor’s Spiritual X-Rays

Buddy Nestor’s abstract portraits of female artists are veiled paintings that capture the figures psychological likeness rather than the literal. Described by the artist as “Spiritual X-Rays”, they are a dark exploration into what lies beneath the skin.

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