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Ryan Salge’s Drawings Conjure Dark Dreams And Eerie Realities

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Artist Ryan Salge’s monochromatic drawings are of surreal scenes that feel like dreamscapes. The tightly-rendered compositions feature expansive outdoor worlds and figures that traverse through them. Often times, the men and women in them are as curious as we are. Their backs are turned towards us, and it’s as if we’re on the journey right along with them.

There’s always something a little strange or alluring in each of Salge’s drawings. A woman looks up to dark, swirling sky as a small patch of light shines through. Another work features bodies rising upwards into the atmosphere. And, in an especially eerie piece, a barefooted man peers down as a spotlight shines onto a desolate field. (Via Lustik)

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Geometrically Choreographed Mixed Media Spacial Collages

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A. Ruiz Villar parcels out space in relation to geometric positions, with minimal pops of color threaded throughout. His subtle gradations of white give special depth and age to the work so imagery doesn’t feel flat, but formed, or architecturally emerging. These vibrant compositions are not easy to visually choreograph– however, Villar makes it look beautifully accidental and organic.

Of his work, Villar’s stance seems like a conceptual mash-up of science, math, and poetry, suggesting it “revolves around the quest for a language akin to the following factors: 1.1.1. Provisionality (doubt): Lack of an evident purpose. 1.1.2. Continuity: There are silences, there’s no rest. 1.1.3. Uprootedness: There’s no commitment to technique, structure, or materials.”

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Bryan Olson’s Sci-Fi Collages

Bryan Olson lives and works in North Carolina. He combines vintage imagery to form an ongoing science fiction themed narrative. Many sci-fi elements are prevalent; portals, UFOs, analytical graphs, and celestial bodies are common in his work.The  collages represent our never ending fascination with the unknown and the search for our place in the Universe.(via)

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Paper Towel Company Sopalin Has Art In Mind To Sell Its Products

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The French paper towel company Sopalin decided to have a little fun and create a tongue in cheek ad campaign that incorporates artistic input, literally.  Instead of using the standard selling method of having their product cleaning up a spilled milk scenario Sopalin features the product creating a design in the spilt milk instead. It takes advertising into another level entirely. The designs in the ad are decorative and simple but the idea is highly creative and innovative. The message touches on the virtues of producing art using common found objects (or messes). While this is not new in the art world it definitely is a rarity in the mainstream ad world.
Sopalin’s other advertising ventures have examined gender roles. In one, a husband and wife team are in the kitchen and after she spills something cannot lift up the paper towels. After much fuss, the husband gets up off his chair and lifts the paper towels. The idea of course is that the towels are so strong you need a man to lift them. Its basic concept definitely a bit more creative than your average product sponsorship.

It’s an interesting study to look at how this particular company uses artistic ways to sell a basic product. It mainly speaks to the fact that manufacturers are recognizing more and more the power art has in not only enriching, educating but now selling too. (via 1designperday)

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Artist Noemie Goudal Recreates A Nostalgic And Fragile Landscape Of Powerful Buildings And Motionless Water

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Parallel worlds are familiar to Noemie Goudal.  She actually recreates them for us on monochrome photographs, using all sorts of artifice to convey our minds to her land of imagination. She connects pure subjects and abandoned sets, to recreate her vision.

In her “Observatories” series she builds models in paper and cardstock and unifies it in an empty landscape of water.  Evoking history and civilization, the stark monuments float like undisturbable icebergs, powerful and dominating the picture. The motionless water reinforces the concept of stability, making one with the buildings.By juxtaposing two pure existing elements in a same location,  the artist duplicates reality and enables the viewer to question the limitation of  reality and fantasy. “I don’t think that my pictures invite anyone into a fantasy world but rather a place made from the real that questions the fantasies, desires and fragility of the viewer.”

There is a feeling of nostalgia in Noemie Goudal’s pictures. As if we were to enter an abandoned site, a deserted battlefield. Time has stopped and here we are stuck in a two dimensional world, between an iceberg and its immobile water. The silence is palpable, anguish is nearby yet the situation is bearable. The notion of communication failure between landscape and human beings is another emphasis of the artist’s photographs. Despite the conception of familiar surroundings, a gap of misunderstanding can occur wherever we are. In order to travel into Noemie Goudal’s work, one has to first understand the creation process to move on to reflections of another type.

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Ariko Inaoka Captures Haunting Portraits Of Icelandic Twin Girls

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Each year, Japanese photographer Ariko Inaoka journeys to Reykjavik, Iceland to continue a very special project: the annual documentation of identical twin girls Erna and Hrefna.

Although Inaoka met the sisters in 2006 at a casting call for a photo shoot, she did not begin regularly photographing them until three years later when they were nine years old. Since then, she has returned to Iceland—a country that she cites as “the place for [her] creativity and inspiration”—each year to document the girls’ growth and to capture their unique interactions.

While all of Inaoka’s photographs of Erna and Hrefna convey an undeniable focus on her subjects’ youth, they also speak to something deeper: their strange and powerful bond. According to Inaoka, the twins are never apart and even share a seemingly telepathic relationship with one another.

Whether portrayed clutching matching dolls, donned in tulle tutus, or in playful positions, there remains a unique and haunting quality to the twins’ portraits—a certain je ne sais quoi that both speaks to and undeniably illustrates Inaoka’s declaration that she has “never seen such a powerful connection between any two human beings.” (Via Bored Panda)

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Willy Verginer Comments On Environmental Issues Using Delicately Made Sculptures From Tree Trunks

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With razor-like precision sculptor Willy Verginer creates figures from a single tree trunk. He carves delicately made pieces which speak and brings to light important issues affecting living things. His latest delves deep into the environmental concerns of crude oil. Instead of overly stating the obvious Verginer makes subtle references to its affect. He places his latest figures including animals and people atop barrels of crude oil. Since oil is liquid the artist purposefully depicts the figures beginning to become stained or contaminated by the substance. This is graphically shown around their feet, hooves or paws and also in their faces. In some he will paint the base on which the figure stands in silver or gold signifying the value placed on the highly valued commodity which is gotten through sacrifice of both creature and environment. When a human figure is used he shows the gold or silver seeping into their shoes or clothes which signifies man’s greed.
The one lingering fact about crude oil responsible for almost every aspect of modern day living is that it is highly toxic and carcinogenic in every form. When it is burned the smoke it produces causes black soot in the air which gets captured in our lungs. If oil is accidentally spilled into the ocean it will kill fish and other sea life almost instantly. As we learn more about its ill effects scientists are looking to provide more alternative ways to produce power which include solar and wind energy. (via hifructose)

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Lauren Roche’s Visceral, Evocative, And Singular Paintings

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lauren-2 figures and an animal_4_770In Lauren Roche‘s paintings, like the best portraiture, there exists a story found in discrepant details. Amidst heavily applied broad stroke of paint and drips, black dots appear to be lactating from human and animals, insinuating teets as opposed to breasts. Teeth are bared in grinless maws not typically associated with people or their pets. And yet there exists an honest and humble beauty in Roche’s rendering of her subjects. Explaining that many subjects are taken from faces of friends and pets, as well as old photographs used for reference, the Minneapolis-based artist adds,

“The figures in my images are facets of my subconscious and take action in a pictorial language and don’t transfer into names for me. I like to leave the interpretation of personality up to the viewer, because that’s what I do.”

Roche’s paintings possess a rawness that cannot be denied, balanced in equal measure by a deft rendering of facial expressions. Perhaps the beauty of these paintings comes from their singular nature, and their anachronistic charm, evocative of a different era of capturing images. When asked the purpose of a focus on portraiture, particularly in an uploadable Digital Age, Roche responds,

“The purpose of portraiture is to give the maker and viewer the space for an interpretation of the subject that is private and flexible, fluid and idiosyncratic. Its difficult to compare portraiture to a cell phone picture because the process is so different. Drawing portraits is like a form of meditation and reflection for me and taking a cell phone picture feels more like a superficial gesture to prove that I’m enjoying myself.”

Roche’s work will be featured in the upcoming Two Dark Horses at Bockley Gallery in Minneapolis, MN, alongside Andrew Mazorol and Tynan Kerr (who when painting collectively go by AMTKpreviously featured here) and Lindsay Rhyner. The exhibition, named after one of Roche’s paintings (top of page) opens this Friday, March 21st and runs through April 26th, 2014.

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