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Carson Davis Brown Disrupts Big Box Stores With Colorful Totems Of Products

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Artist Carson Davis Brown wants to disrupt the big box stores (think Walmart or Target), or “places of mass” as he calls them. Not by making a lot of noise or leaving the aisles in total disarray, but by creating site-specific installations titled Mass that feature carefully-selected and thoughtfully-arranged products. He’ll pick one color and group those objects into totem-like structures that line the shelves, create an island in the shoe aisle, or block an important door. They form visually-pleasing works of art that are documented via photographs.

It’s no surprise that these installations were made without the permission of the store; Brown takes things from all around and somehow arranges the displays without getting stopped by staff. They are then left until they are inevitably disassembled.

There’s an inherent beauty of these works, but a guilty pleasure that comes from enjoying them. Brown’s disruptions highlight just how massive these warehouse-type stores really are – just look at the range of products. This “convenience” has put many “mom and pop” shops out of business. So, these works are a small way of fighting back. But, at the same time, having to disassemble these displays must be done by the lowest level, least-well paid employees – the sales staff.

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Manuel Vason Interview

Veenus Vortex + Manuel Vason Collaboration 2006

Veenus Vortex + Manuel Vason Collaboration 2006

Seems like we have a sexual theme going today on the blog so I thought i’d add another post to the mix by sharing this great interview with Italian photographer Manuel Vason on one of my favorite new art&design blogs Yatzer. The interview is a great read so make sure to give it a look.

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Jason Jagel

FIFTY24SF_JasonJagelFlyer-copyJason Jagel‘s solo, (I’ll Fly) Into Your Heart, opens tonight in San Francisco at the FIFTY24SF Gallery.

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Chromosomal visualization

DNA Radio (German experts on biotech) converts the entire human genome to images and audio that will be streaming on the internet 24/7. Isn’t it crazy that figuratively, all we are made up of are these dots? Here’s a little science lesson for you…

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Paintings That Capture Subtle Anticipation

Grace Mikell Ramsey - Painting Grace Mikell Ramsey - Painting

 Grace Mikell Ramsey - Painting

It would be too easy to suggest that Grace Mikell Ramsey‘s work only illustrates moments of science fiction or fantasy. This is not what draws us into her narratives. Instead, it’s her ability to capture subtle anticipation– insular moments of contemplation where reality gestures goodbye. Her characters stand on the precipice, holding their breath, surrendering to dreamy whims only young children or covens of three are capable of conjuring, unable to shake a certain heaviness of the pending trade and what is at stake.

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Nathan Vincent’s Six Foot Crocheted Doily Warns ‘Be Good For Goodness Sake’

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Be Good For Goodness Sake detail 2

Be Good for Goodness Sake broadcast

Santa is not the only one you telling you to be good for goodness sakes. In today’s word, that is, in today’s virtual, and real life panopticon, you have no other choice but to be good for the sake or yourself, your life, your job, etc. Your success as a human being depends on your good (or bad?) pubic, and well documented, behavior. Everyone is watching, everyone is judging.

“Be Good for Goodness Sake”,a three-person show featuring works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York, explores ideas of surveillance and public performance in the age of the virtual panopticon (intagram, facebook, etc).

Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the gallery,  “Be Good for Goodness Sake” pushes audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media.

Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and it invites the spectators to to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

The exhibition, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will be on view at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York until January 19th, 2014.

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Adam Gondek

Adam gondek collage

Keeping with my collage theme for today I present the work of Chicago based artist Adam Gondek. Am I crazy or do some of these have a Richard Prince feel to them? Maybe it’s just the naked ladies.

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Spencer Kovats Reveals the Impressive And Extensive Tattoos That We Hide

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Do you know someone who, beneath their clothes, has extensive tattoos? They might look unassuming from the outside, but underneath reveals their impressive collection of body art. That’s the idea behind Vancouver-based photographer Spencer Kovats’ series Uncovered, in which he invites strangers to pose in two photos- one where they appear fully-clothed and the other where we see their ink in all its glory.

The subjects have colorful, full sleeves and backs of intricate designs that showcase the art of tattooing. There is an interesting juxtaposition between the two photos, as someone sheds their skin to who they really are. They look more relaxed and at ease. At the same time, it also challenges us to think about how we judge people and how this changes after we see stripped down.

Kovats is one of 11 photographers participating in the “The Tattoo Project” that began during a long weekend 2010. Hundreds of tattooed people journeyed to shared studio space to pose before the cameras. The photographers captured thousands of portraits that each explored different aspects of body art. (Via Huffington Post)

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