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Ronit Baranga’s Creepy And Strangely Arousing Ceramic Tableware Covered With Fingers And Mouths

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Ronit Baranga is an Israeli artist known for her bizarre sculptural works, which include a series of ceramic tablewares hybridized with human body parts: open mouths, protruding tongues, and gouging fingers. These strange, anatomical additions are incredibly detailed, so much so you can make out the the glistening taste buds and knuckle creases. While these pieces are both creepy and attention-grabbing, from a critical standpoint, their meaning may seem a bit elusive; our reactions to them are initially visceral. Speaking to this, Baranga writes:

“I would like that anyone who sees my work feels something – what they feel is not relevant to me, as long as they feel. I hope that the emerging feelings will cause the viewers to think about the ideas behind my work… The combination of ceramic cups with ceramic fingers represent an idea in which the still creates a will of its own, enabling a cup to decide whether to stay or leave the situation it is in.” (Source)

Baranga’s designs, then, grant inanimate objects a form of agency: the plates desire to eat, the finger-walking teacups seek to wander, and their self-awareness challenges the way we think about and interact with such objects. What they also explore is the way eros is incorporated into unexpected things. The parted lips and probing fingers — both of which are erogenous body parts used in sexual exploration — elicit erotic associations. However, there is also an element of revulsion: imagine a stranger’s hands digging through your food, recognize that the hungry mouths emerging on your plate are the receptacles for the unglamorous digestive process. Baranga’s works may arouse you, but they will also suppress your appetite.

Check out Baranga’s website for more of her fascinating sculptural works. (Via Juxtapoz)

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Ryan Lake’s Bored In The Suburbs

Ryan Lake’s seamless blend of traditional and digital techniques create  loose narratives of characters caught in a world of their own. My favorite works are his ongoing series series of images dealing with boredom in the suburbs which is a theme I can relate to. Being bored in the burbs was one of the main reasons I started Beautiful/Decay! If you like Ryan’s work make sure to pick up a copy of the Beautiful/Decay: Underdogs book which features Ryan’s work.

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Dalip Singh’s Stunningly Detailed Illustrations Depict The Earth’s Environments As Tortured Yin Yangs

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Dalip Singh is a Creative Director working with the McCann Worldgroup, India, who has embarked on a project to blend art with science in order to foster social awareness on environmental issues. Titled Yin Yang, the project involves wall-sized illustrations of the Earth in turmoil, blackened with fire and smoke and strewn with industrial waste and dead or suffering animals. The illustrations are divided into Land, Water, and Air, and the tortured geographies reflect these three elements. Each one derives from Dalip’s lengthy investigations into the types of environmental pollutions and their related factors and causes. The actual artistic production was a multi-step process lasting over 9 months, which Dalip describes:

The rough sketches were done for more than a month by me and two illustrators. The original illustrations were hand drawn on wall-sized sheets. I tried for as much detail and reality as possible. The illustrations were then painted with watercolors, photographed and digitalized. The last leg of the campaign involved the laborious task of retouching. It was pretty challenging to keep the synergy of earth colors (green and blue) intact while bringing forth the black and white of Yin Yang in the artwork, at the same time. (Source)

Those who know about the yin yang and its symbolic significance will detect the irony and critical imbalance showing in Dalip’s illustrations. The yin yang signifies an interconnection between opposite yet complementary forces; there is darkness in the light, and vice versa. Here, however, the “light” half — represented by images of green and sustainable environments — has been pushed to the periphery, while the rest of the world crumbles in destruction. While beautiful and engrossing in their detail, Yin Yang troubles us with depictions of a world pushing beyond philosophical ideals of balance and harmony. (Via Bored Panda)

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Typography Made From Empty Space And Everday Objects

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The words ‘serif’ and ‘sans serif’ can get a designers heart beating a bit faster – new and interesting fonts can be a inspirational jumping off point.  These photograph based letters from New York based photographer Bela Borsodi definitely have a wide appeal.  Borsodi uses household objects and empty space so as to nearly make it appear he happened on the letters by chance.  He clearly has a knack for making the meticulously planned appear casual.  Borsodi’s skill has won him clients such as the Esquire, Details, and the Wall Street Journal.  Also, see his work previously here. [via]

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Troy Moth

Troy moth’s photos of nature are surely inspired by growing up in a remote tree-planting camp on the west coast of Canada. His work has a stillness and meditative quality that most of us city slickers yearn for but can’t ever achieve.

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Canan Cengel

It’s pretty fun discovering the fetus shapes in each of these sangria colored pieces of wrinkled fabric. I know, that probably sounds weird but Canan Cengel really deserves all praises for her eye on detail, creating the perfect positioning and shadowing for her aptly titled project: f. Check the rest below.

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Samantha Wall’s Cathartic Look At Multiracial Identity Through Portraiture

 
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Indivisible is a series of graphite and charcoal portraits of multiracial women done by artist Samantha Wall. According to Wall, it is a study to understand her own dual ethnicity and capture subtle human expressions which transcend gender or race. By working with these women she was able to delve deeper into not only her own multiracial skin but also into others and in the process study the facial movement of each subject. To Wall, this was particularly important because as a multiracial person she related to the theories of Paul Eckmann who claimed that no matter what the background; financially, sexually, racially etc. certain human emotions could be universally understood through facial expression. However, at the time of her research, Wall was interested in emotions that could not be conveyed through facial gestures such as shame. Wall says as a child growing up in Korea and then the U.S. she felt a lot of shame which was a result from her mother’s set of Korean values.
The drawings in Indivisible are a cathartic look at women like Wall who may or may not have experienced the same feelings. It captures different emotions through subtle use of line and gesture bringing the essence of each person to the forefront. Part of Wall’s process was taking dozens of digital photographs of the women she met with, then studying those pictures to make her delicate yet powerful drawings. The end result is a sensitive look at these diversely beautiful women.  (via illusionscene360)

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Artist Interview: Pat Perry

 

Between train cars and mopeds, and over the course of thousands of miles, Pat Perry slowly realizes his dream of busting outside the confines of the mundane. All too often that monotony can squelch creative impulses, but this intrepid illustrator is pretty determined to avoid that at all cost. After getting in touch with Pat over email, we exchanged a few wayward text messages and in the end, missed each other in Chicago. It was between stops on this summer expedition of his, that he was able to answer some questions about the nature of his incredibly detailed work.

In a modern art era where so much is done digitally, Pat’s calculated and surreal illustrations bend back the paradigm by once again elevating the work elaborated by a traveler’s hands. His illustrations feels perfectly proportioned, almost as if in motion. Less reliance on symmetry and more focus on flow. There’s an energy about the continuity and vibrance of his images, whether the color scheme is brilliant or tempered, and his ability to satisfy a breadth of clients while still solidifying his fine art itch is admirable. Pat is dedicated to staying on his creative toes, which only means good news for those of us who know he’s on to something.

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