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Scott Hocking’s Bad Graffiti

Scott Hocking has documented one of my favorite things, bad graffiti. Starting in 2007 scott has photographed hundreds of scribbles in and around Detroit. Maybe it’s the shakey lettering, potty mouth humor,  or the never ending typos but I rather see some bad graffiti over real graffiti any ol’ day.

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Joseph Loughborough Draws The Dark Side Of Human Nature

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British artist Joseph Loughborough creates dark and grotesque , yet delicate and beautiful charcoal drawings that challenge and trigger existential questions and anxieties.

Loughborough’s trademarks an expressive,  impulsive  and honest style that strikes as vague at first; however, a closer look reveals deep and thoughtful technical decisions that render his concepts fairly well; his choices are simultaneously charming and intimidating.

Through his eerie,whimsical subjects, whose faces are usually deconstructed, Loughborough renders the grim side of human nature: sin, desire, fear and anxiety over one’s own absurdity.

I can understand why my work is considered dark but I have never really looked at it in this way. I have always intended it to be revealing, honest and expressive. Some of the pieces act like a personal exorcism through which I try to express, rather than deny, the emotions I encounter. Through my drawing, I strive to grasp a comprehension of the human condition and question how we interpret our oft-untold fears and desires.

(via Feather of Me)

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Incredible Gif Shows A Microscope Zooming In On A Bug, On A Bug, On A Bug

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The beauty of the .gif file movement is the documentation of the moving image. This leads to explorations in effects, one of the most impressive being the zoom, which taken to it’s logical conclusion can have stunning results. One .gif in particular, taken by James Tyrwhitt-Drake, utilizes a scanning electronic microscope from the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility, and clipping each scanned image into a fantastically detailed, zooming .gif.

Tyrwhitt-Drake, who also runs the blog Infinity Imagined, begins the .gif with a view of an amphipod (a classification of shell-less crustacean), zooming in further to reveal a diatom (a class of algae notable for their silica shells) on top of the amphipod, and further revealing a microscopic bacterium. Proving once again (if proof was needed) how visually stunning science can be. (via smithsonian)

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Chuck Close Interview

Charlie Rose interviews one of the most famous living artists today about becoming permanently paralyzed, his painting process, and how luck can be more important than success.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Movie Noise

Ever wonder why all the sound in movies sounds so crisp and clear? It’s because this guy spends months recording them one sound at a time.

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Kai Sekimachi’s Delicate Bowls Made Of Leaf Skeletons Can Take A Pounding

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Kai Sekimachi - leaf bowls

Although she is more known for her weaving and looming, artist Kai Sekimachi has shown she can branch out into other areas of expression with her impressive bowls made from leaves. Defying the very nature of the materials she works with, Sekimachi has come up with a way to make a flimsy leaf into a structure that can support heavier objects. By adding Kozo paper, watercolor and Krylon coating to the leaves, she is able to turn a skeletal transparent leaf into something that isn’t those things at all.

Having written numerous books on arts and crafts with her husband, Bob Stocksdale, she is an expert on many areas of handmade items and objects. The pair’s practices are both anchored in nature, and show their extensive knowledge as pioneers of American Craft.

Sekimachi creates distinctive pieces from natural materials such as linen, decaying leaves, shells, and grass, and pairs them with nature inspired motifs. (Source)

Sekimachi is not afraid to try her hand at new things, and proves repeatedly that she is a fast learner. After seeing a group of students weaving at the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1949, where she was also enrolled, the very next day, the curious artist spent all of her savings on a loom of her own. She then went and perfected her craft over the next few years.

The influential couple will be having an exhibition at the Bellevue Arts Museum titled In The Realm Of Nature from July 3 to October 18 in Washington. (Via Bored Panda)

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Olympia Le-Tan

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I don’t normally go in for crafty stuff, or faux-vintage design, or, um, purses, but I have to say I am really digging these embroidered purses from Olympia Le-Tan. They may appear to be books, but as style.com reports “The ‘books’ in question are actually rectangular box clutches that feature hand-knit copies of the covers of some favorite reads.” These make me wish I carried a purse, err, “rectangular box clutch.” Maybe she can make some laptop bags or something? Or some actual book covers? Come on Penguin, commission this woman!

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Michael West’s Bicycle Made Out Of Wood, Willow And Stinging Nettle

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A bicycle made out willow, ash and stinging nettle found in it’s organic and primal form in nature, near the artist’s home in Somerset, England. Michael West has built an intricate sculpture as a self portrait. Imitating each and every components of a real bike from the handlebars to the tires. His process of creation excludes all boundaries, he lets the imagination interpret the symbols he left out on the bike to understand the meaning of his art.

He was influenced by Van Gogh’s chair, where the empty chair is used as the personification of its owner. “I chose the bike as society often uses anthropomorphism to reflect themselves within everyday objects, for example a car may be male or female and often given a personality and sometimes even a name”.

Michael West believes in playing with the subconscious to create. Blending an adult and a child’s vision, he gathers many layers, clue information such as symbols, signs and colors to clarify his intentions and his claims towards society and politics.This process creates a dynamic relationship between the artist and his object. The details characterized by a slow construction, attention to detail and means chosen carefully mirror the artist’s personality. This assembled bike, at first and abstract piece; becomes the reality of Michael West and soon an extension of himself.(Via Junkculture)

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