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Four Fashion Designers / Illustrators Who Create Captivating Sketches

Langley Fox

Langley Fox

Ines Katamso

Ines Katamso

Katie Gallagher

Katie Gallagher

Laura Laine

Laura Laine

Walking the line between fashion illustration and fine art these fashion designers are capable of creating beautiful drawings.  Whimsical and fanciful, each artist is able to transfer images from imagination to paper in a way that is unique and dramatic.

Langley Fox’s beautiful graphite drawings are surreal and poetic.  Sometimes purely beautiful and sometimes borderline bizarre Fox captures her subjects, often times figments of her imagination, with impressive precision and detail.

Intrigued by ancient Greek mythology, particularly the legend of the Moirai, Inès Katamso’s illustrations are enchanting and narrative.  In the legend, the Moirai, or Fates, were white-robed incarnations of destiny.  Clotho (spinner), Lachesis (allotter) and Atropos (unturnable), controlled the metaphorical thread of life for every mortal from birth to death.  Katamso became interested in the idea of the “thread of life” and the line itself.  Her beautiful illustrations capture this interest in the line, gracefully weaving lines together to create amazing compositions.

New York designer Katie Gallagher’s sketches are moody, dark and evocative.  Telling a story that is at once about fashion and something else—something more serious and haunting—they transcend mere fashion sketches and become fantastical stories.

Helsinki-based illustrator Laura Laine’s characters are serious, sometimes frightening, but ultimately incredible.  Each has a distinct personality that exudes attitude.  Her quasi gothic, certainly poignant images are intriguing and lovely.

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Chris Jordan’s Photographs of Bird Carcasses With Stomachs Full Of Plastic

“On Midway Atoll, a remote cluster of islands more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent, the detritus of our mass consumption surfaces in an astonishing place: inside the stomachs of thousands of dead baby albatrosses. The nesting chicks are fed lethal quantities of plastic by their parents, who mistake the floating trash for food as they forage over the vast polluted Pacific Ocean.

For me, kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth. Like the albatross, we first-world humans find ourselves lacking the ability to discern anymore what is nourishing from what is toxic to our lives and our spirits. Choked to death on our waste, the mythical albatross calls upon us to recognize that our greatest challenge lies not out there, but in here.

~cj, Seattle, February 2011″

For updates on Chris Jordan”s upcoming film MIDWAY, visit www.midwayjourney.com.

More pictures after the jump!

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AKA.CORLEONE

beat_800 Pedro Campiche  (AKA.CORLEONE) is a graphic designer and illustrator from Portugal. His work includes illustration and type play. He is also the founder of OK! Collective, a platform for creative and artistic projects. At just 24 years of age, it’s definately impressive. Stop by his page and give him some positive feedback because his work is awesome.

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Michael Rea – New Work

Last Friday, Mike Rea flexed his art muscle again here in Chicago with what might be his gnarliest feat yet, a thirty something foot super gun named Benita. More photos after the jump…

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Proof That Siberia Is More Than Just Snow

Vladivostok, 2009

Vladivostok, 2009

Holiday, Vissarion sect, City of the Sun, Krasnoyarsk Territory, 2006

Holiday, Vissarion sect, City of the Sun, Krasnoyarsk Territory, 2006

Koryak foothills, Kamchatka, 2000

Koryak foothills, Kamchatka, 2000

Newlyweds, suburbs of Novosibirsk, November 2010

Newlyweds, suburbs of Novosibirsk, November 2010

A new photography exhibition at the American University Museum wants to show you that Siberia is more than just a cold, barren place. Titled Siberia in the Eyes of Russian Photographers, it paints the Russian region in a different light. Photographs boast impressive landscapes and even some warm weather; We see children swimming and people wearing short-sleeved shirts. Anton Fedyashin, the executive director of the Initiative for Russian Culture at American University, spoke with Slate about stereotypes of Siberia. “Notions of Siberia in the United States come from Hollywood,” he said. “They come from films that emphasize the morbid exoticism of Siberia, the endless white plains, the sparse villages. Those are the kinds of images that are most widespread in the West. Of course, Siberia during winter does look like that, but there’s another side of the story.”

Siberia makes up about 75 perfect of Russia’s landmass, but only 25 percent of its population. The people who live there are described as having an independent spirit, much like pioneers who settled in the American West during the 19th century. The exhibition draws comparisons between the two places. “It’s an image that overemphasizes the negative aspects of this enormous part of the Eurasian continent and one that completely underrepresents the enormous geographical variety, which is breathtakingly beautiful. The exhibit shows that it’s equally as beautiful and eerily similar to the American West.” Fedyashin explains. While many Western photographers chose to accentuate the emptiness of Siberia, the Russian photographers in this exhibition depict a multifaceted place, spanning from the 1860’s to 2011.  (Via Slate)

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David Lynch’s Factory Photography Is As Surreal As His Films

David Lynch - Photography David Lynch - Photography David Lynch - Photography David Lynch - Photography

If you’re familiar with the films of David Lynch, then you know the subtle uneasiness that he makes you feel. It doesn’t just stop with movies, as Lynch is also a photographer.  Between 1980 and 2000, he shot monochromatic images of factories in Berlin, Poland, New York, New Jersey, and England. The result is a book of photographs titled The Factory Photographs, selections of which are currently on view  at The Photographers’ Gallery in London.

It’s clear that the filmmaker’s eye transfers effortlessly between the moving picture and a static one.  These landscapes are beautiful, but desolate and haunting; Their moodiness makes them feel as if they are of a different time and dystopian future. “I love industry. Pipes. I love fluid and smoke. I love man-made things. I like to see people hard at work, and I like to see sludge and man-made waste,” Lynch writes in his book.

The photographer practices transcendental meditation, and his penchant for delving into the strange and unconscious part of ourselves is not lost on these photographs. In the exhibit’s press release, Lynch says, “I just like going into strange worlds. A lot more happens when you open yourself up to the work and let yourself act and react to it.” These provocative images invite us to do the same. (Via Fast Company)

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Lisa Park’s Brainwaves Used To Create Performance Art

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Eunoia from Lisa Park on Vimeo.

Artist Lisa Park‘s performance titled Euonia – a Greek word that can be translated as “beautiful thinking”.  The title is apt as Park’s thought’s are central the beauty of her performance.  She makes use of an EEG headset which monitors various brainwaves and eye movement.  The resulting information is translated into sound directed to one of five speakers.  A shallow pan of water sits on each speaker, vibrating and shimmering with each of Park’s various thoughts.  Park associated each of the five speakers with a different emotion and would recall various memories of people important to her in order to manipulate the speakers.  She had hoped to develop the ability, through practice, to end her performance in silence but could not – an outcome perhaps more interesting than she had intended.  It may be the brain is much more difficult to quiet than it seems.  Be sure to check out the video to see Lisa Park’s brain in action.  [via]

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Mernet Larson

At age 72, Mernet Larson is having her first solo show in new york right now. Her show Three Chapters is slated to be shown in three consecutive bodies of work– Heads and Bodies, Places, and Narratives. The first two have already come and gone, but if you’re in the NY area you should check out her Narratives chapter at the Johannes Vogt gallery before it gets taken down on the 27th . “These works navigate the divide between abstraction and representation with a form of geometric figuration that owes less to Cubo-Futurism than to de Chirico, architectural rendering and early Renaissance painting of the Sienese kind. They relish human connection and odd, stretched out, sometimes contradictory perspectival effects, often perpetuated by radical shifts in scale.” – New York Times (via)

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