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Rad, Dude: Michael Galinsky’s Photographs Captures Malls From the 80’s

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Photographer Michael Galinsky’s series Malls Across America captures what we simultaneously love and hate about the mall. Stale air, artificial light, and swarms of teenagers are all captured in photographs from 1989. It was in the 1980’s and 1990’s that these places were at the height of popularity and a bastion of consumerism; Galinsky’s photos now is like digging up a time capsule.

Malls Across America began in the winter of 1989 at the Smith Haven Mall in Garden City Long Island. Galinsky travelled from North Carolina to South Dakota, Washington State and beyond photographing malls. We can look at this series as a source of amusement and anthropological study. There are ostentatious 80’s fashions (a lot of big hair) and the beginnings of 90’s grunge.

In many of these photographs, we are the voyeur. I get the feeling that Galinsky took these photographs on the sly, trying to be inconspicuous about it. He captures images through plants, behind people on escalators, and standing outside stores as women are conferring about clothing choices. Because Galinsky makes us both the voyeur and the viewer, I can’t help but feel a little bad for spying. But, considering all the 80’s movies that included mall hijinks, it feels oddly fitting.

These malls still exist, they are just dead. My hometown mall still looks eerily familiar to what’s in these photographs. If this series makes you feel nostalgic for your own mall, you can buy a book of Galinsky’s work. Aptly titled, Malls Across America, it was released this past summer. (Via It’s Nice That and Gizmodo)

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Stephen Mattheu Booth

 

Stephen Mattheu Booth knows how to make a character worth remembering. I can’t say exactly what it is I enjoy about his characters, but they all just seem like they would be awesome to hang around with, and even his abstractions retain this figurative charm. I’ve always had an appreciation for this manner of art in which one can imagine the artist making these awesome drawings on a couch, or in bed, or at a bar, all without having to go to a studio and worshiping an easel, or using some computer tool to clean up his lines. It just feels right. And fortunately, he doesn’t draw fan artish mutated forms of Spongebob or Mickey Mouse, but instead, his work seems to sprout (growth being important here) from characters like Slimer, Donald Duck, Pluto, and other childhood favorites. How could you look at that #$!@*☁ duck and not smile?

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Nathan Walsh’s Amazingly Photorealistic Paintings Of The City

Nathan Walsh paintings6 Nathan Walsh paintings3

Nathan Walsh paintings7

Artist Nathan Walsh‘s paintings of urban environments seem impressively realistic.  The attention to detail in turn demands the viewers attention to small pockets of each canvas.  Varying textures, reflections on water and glass, effects of light are all captured so acutely, it’s nearly mesmerizing.  Exploring each piece is similar to exploring that little patch of neighborhood as a tourist.  However, it is Walsh’s careful attention to perspective that set his work apart.  It is easy to understand why he may often be lumped in with a larger group of Photorealist painters.  However, close consideration of his work reveals Walsh isn’t set on a meticulously faithful reproduction of a photograph or scene.  Rather, he seems to endeavor to depict the idea of a space, the feeling of depth.

In his essay on the artist, Michael Parasko expounds on this and writes concerning Walsh’s use of perspective:

“The way Walsh constructs pictorial space takes two forms. The first is a horizontal extension and the second an illusion of depth. Both are exaggerated so that neither method results in the reproduction of nature; yet in such exaggerations Walsh has sought to create believable space. We are convinced into thinking these are images of the world as it is, but the truth is that space in these paintings is not really like the space we inhabit at all. They seem to prove Quintallian’s old adage, ‘The perfection of art is to conceal art.’…Although there is real quality in the way Walsh extends space in this lateral way, my personal view is that Walsh’s most individual works are concerned with the illusion of deep space within the canvas. In these there is a real sense of an artist balancing the need to maintain the illusion of reality with the desire to push the illusion of very deep space to its limits.”

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Sebastian E.

Large-scale public art installations and sculpture by Chilean born artist Sebastian E. His work draws upon a wealth of political and religious themes in very clever ways, often with a deeply twisted sense of whimsey.

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Sponsored Post: Malibu’s Best Summer Ever Project

With summer in full swing we’re looking forward to lots of new adventures in the sun. Whether it’s hitting the beach with friends, going on a road trip to unseen sites, or throwing the ultimate party, we’re looking to make this summer the best one ever! The good folks at Malibu love summer just as much as the rest of us and have decided to help us start on the right foot by encouraging all of us to just say yes to fun, sun and adventure with their Best Summer Ever Project. All you need to do to get started is to visit their YouTube page and create your very own Best Summer Ever List out of hundreds of fun suggestions. If you’re feeling extra brave hit the random button and Malibu will randomly assign you your very own list! If that’s not enough starting on July 17th you can watch Malibu’s Youtube reality show where four friends spend forty days taking on 40 challenges. They’ll be in the drivers seat and you’ll get to watch all the fun and crazy shenanigans as they embark on their summer adventure. So on your mark, get set, Go! Your best summer ever awaits!

This post has been sponsored by Malibu.

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Video Watch: Scotland’s Django Django Hand of Man

Photograph by David Drake

Django Django released their self-titled debut record last fall on Ribbon Music and was not only nominated for a Mercury Prize, but was also listed in Rolling Stone and NME‘s top 50 albums of 2012. They’ve been touring since last January when their album was initially released overseas. I missed them when they performed at Bardot in Los Angeles for School Night last September and they unfortunately had to cancel their Iceland Airwaves appearance due to illness. Lucky for me and you, they are back on the road with dates across the U.S. starting in March including two nights at Brooklyn’s Music Hall of Williamsburg with the last show of the tour arriving on March 23rd at LA’s Fonda Theatre.

Last week they premiered their new video on Nowness for the Hand of Man directed by Bafta Award winner John Maclean, brother to Django drummer/producer Dave Maclean. Way to keep it in the family guys! Check out the video and grab some tickets for an upcoming show via Ticketmaster.

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Carlie Armstrong’s Work Place

Carlie Armstrong’s Work Place site is  a fantastic ongoing documentary project documenting the work places of  Portland creatives. Whether it’s a painter, a musician, or designer, Carlie aims to not just understand the creative process but to also document the spaces that contain them.

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Nicola Hicks balances the mythical and the anthropomorphic

Aesop’s pranksters, villains and modest heroes are apposite subjects for sculptor Nicola Hicks, whose work frequently balances the mythical and the anthropomorphic.This exceptional selection of new sculptures form a body of work surrounding contemporary themes, imbuing great energy and combining complex compositions with painstakingly detailed expressions.
It is important to recognize that Hicks is not interested in merely illustrating the fables, rather the works serve as a catalyst for her creative process, providing the foundation upon which she is able to express her own personal visual language. Furthermore, the lively narrative has enabled Hicks to continue her investigation into the effects of gravity on the physicality and assemblage of the works, whilst allowing her to pursue her chosen composition.

The raw-edged, tactile nature of these works epitomizes Hicks’ delight in sculpting. Plaster is blended and contoured into natural forms creating aesthetic qualities rich with spontaneity and strength so as to capture the essence of the characters.This, combined with the large scale of the sculptures forces us to confront the realities of the fables.
Rather than depicting the resolution of each of the fables, the animals are frozen in their moments of decision.The expression of the transitory moment serves to evoke the innate sensibilities of her subjects.The foolish crow has not yet dropped his cheese, unaware that soon he will be hungry and mocked on his branch.

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