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Lucie Malbéqui

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Eighteen year old photographer Lucie Malbéqui uses her camera to capture slices of time. She emphasizes her youth and its brevity by using film to record “a piece of atmosphere, a piece of time.” Malbéqui feels that with film, she eliminates some of the artificial elements that are nearly always present in digital photos, instead favoring the raw and imperfect images she can create by allowing the sun’s light to preserve a moment.

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Geoffrey Todd Smith @ Luis De Jesus, LA !


This coming Saturday (Jamuary 22nd), Geoffrey Todd Smith opens up Casual X @ Luis De Jesus. Using the letter X as a jump -off point for his newest suite of paintings, Smith serves up a helping of beautifully big-balled geometric abstraction. More jams after the jump…

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Complete Your B/D Collection Sale!

Calling all you completists! Forget about your vintage coin collection and enjoy The Beautiful/Decay Back Issue Sale! Once upon a time only Czars and Royalty could complete their B/D collection, but now you, too, can complete your collection on the cheap. We’re talking over 55% off all back issues for one week! Take advantage and complete your collection of the most comprehensive art and design magazine today!

Sale Ends: May 3rd 2011

 

 

 

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Beautiful/Decay Apparel Summer ‘09 Release

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Beautiful/Decay has collaborated with a fresh crop of explosive new talents from the art and design world to create this Summer ’09 season. As usual, the t-shirt graphics range from bold, iconic graphics to playfully eclectic….but all share B/D’s signature aesthetic of bright, creative imagery that pushes the envelope of t-shirt design. Some talents from our roster include Sakke Soini, Kittozutto, Christopher Gray, Dekore, Oliver Hibert, Clara Terne and beyond. Pick up the latest styles on our online shop!

Check out the entire line after the jump.

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B/D Best of 2010 – William Steinman

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New York based artist William Steinman creates sexy and raw pieces that carry a strong undertone of their source of inspiration: street culture and Pop art. Growing up, he kept himself busy by exploring downtown Phoenix on his skateboard. In doing so, he was introduced to the graffiti art that populated his surroundings, and fell in love with it. Though William was initially inspired, he started to notice how increasingly redundant graffiti was turning out. He decided to focus his artistic endeavors elsewhere, and started to study painting. But first love is always the strongest, and William found himself charmed by the bold lines and appropriated imagery of Pop art.

Observing William Steinman’s paintings and sculptures is the equivalent of trying to stay perfectly still inside a hurricane of motion. He constantly plays with adaptation and reconstruction within an environment of deconstruction. Using found materials, store bought objects, comic books, and finishing them off with industrial glue, the end result is what he likes to accurately describe as “the dark side of Pop.”

William is currently an MFA student over at Queens College in New York City. In a few weeks he will be presenting his bold, raw, and sexy portfolio of work at his MFA Thesis show. Unfortunately, I live much too far and will not be able to attend. However, anyone out there who will be in the area should definitely indulge themselves! Go!

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Kara Walker’s Gigantic Sugar-Coated Female Sphinx Makes A Powerful Statement

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Kara Walker’s new sculpture “A Subtlety” is pure white, coated in 160,000 pounds of bleached sugar; with this modern take on the ancient sphinx, the legendary artist crafts a towering black face in honor of the slave laborers who worked in sugar cane fields. The powerful work is meant to address racial and sexual exploitation; like the sugar that coats her polystyrene core, this black female figure has been pressured, against nature, into succumbing to whiteness.

The work is now on display at the old Williamsburg, Brooklyn Domino sugar factory shed, where it reaches to the ceiling and extends for a magnificent 75 feet. The mythical creature is a powerful assertion of the black female self; the face quite resembles the artists’ own, and a carefully wrought bandana subtly references the stereotypical (and often offensive) symbol of the mammy, a slave woman who nurtured and brought up white children. Walker has been the subject of debate in the past for her use of contested imagery, and despite the controversy surrounding the “mammy” figure, she is presented here as powerful and divine.

Like the ancient sphinxes of Egypt and Greece, Walker’s monolithic creation is godly, simultaneously fearsome and comforting. The sphinx, known for protecting the tombs of royalty, becomes the guardian of history, interrupting a white-washed historical narrative to make visible the labor of the men and women who were kept enslaved. Her face is serene, assured, and unyielding. The sphinx character, in addition to being a protector, is also dangerous, renowned for devouring those who cannot answer her riddle; Walker’s sphinx is similarly confrontational in her overwhelming size, forcing viewers to confront the complex and painful history of American industry. (via The New York Times)

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Nick Ruechel

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Nick Ruechel is a photographer with an interest in confrontation and history. His images are timely, prudent, and worth ingraining in your memory.

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Jon Smith’s Multi-Textured Explosive Light Bulb Photography

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A chemist by trade, Jon Smith‘s high speed photography captures exploding light bulbs. He first fills the bulbs with various textural elements, such as feathers, sand, candy, dust, and paint. He then sometimes dips the light bulbs into paint before shooting them with a pellet gun and capturing the results. Smith’s method creates photographs that are rich in texture, color, and movement. Back in March, Smith told Flickr “People see and use light bulbs every day. They’re something we don’t pay attention to…by shooting them, having them explode and filling them with different materials creates an interesting juxtaposition that I’m really drawn to.” Known on Flickr as WideEyedIlluminations, you can read more about Smith’s light bulb photography over at Flickr’s blog where he is also featured in a video discussing how photography saved his life.

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