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Nathan Alexis Brown’s Blank Generation

Welcome to Nathan Alexis Brown’s blank generation.  Where punk dudes drink forties and hang around a camp fire  with luchadores and werewolves.  All while wearing a few of the most mind blowingly cool denim vests that would even make Tezz Roberts drool.

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Kar­ley Feaver’s Stuffed Birds With Bizarre Haircuts

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New Zealand-based artist Kar­ley Feaver creates assemblages that involve a mix­ture of stuffed birds and various costume-like adornment ( human hair, gold plated metal, wood, and more). The artist claims that the animals she uses are ethically sourced and have died of natural causes.

Through her grotesque yet beautiful sculptures, the artist explores the idea of trans­for­ma­tion and adorn­ment, as her cur­rent inter­ests rest in nature’s abil­ity to sur­vive in dif­fer­ent forms by adapt­ing, adjust­ing, and mutat­ing into an increas­ingly man-made environment.

She intends to make these birds look other-worldly. Interestingly enough, she is successful at doing this by using materials that we are very familiar with (human hair, gold, and wood). She makes an interesting juxtaposition between the natural and the unnatural, the familiar and the unfamiliar- specifically to make a point about the unnatural efforts animals (in general) have to make in order to survive in a man-made environment.

Through the ages peo­ple have made beau­ti­ful things for them­selves and oth­ers by using mate­ri­als from their nearby envi­ron­ment. Birds are known to do the same, espe­cially when seek­ing to attract a mate. Feaver’s new works bring the image of beauty almost to the edge of absur­dity, their appear­ance is both bizarre and extra­or­di­nary, unlike any other crea­ture on earth.

(via Brown Paper Bag)

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Franco Recchia’s Urban Skyline Sculpture Made from Recycled Computer Parts

 

Really cool cityscape sculptures created from recycled computer parts by Italian artist Franco Recchia. The cold mechanics of the dead computer hardware bring a strange quality to the works. And the claustrophobic elements of urban life are nicely captured in how compact each piece is. The sculptures give off a haulted vibe- it’s as if someone pulled the plug out of life itself and all that’s left is a series of plastic, green shells. See more from the series after the jump. (via)

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Richard Pearse’s Wood Grids

I’m loving these wood collage paintings by Richard Pearse.  Some great textures and color combinations throughout his entire body of work.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: 8 Hours In Brooklyn

Spend 8 splendid, cinematic, slow motion, picture perfect hours in the city of Brooklyn with Next Level Pictures. Watch the full video after the jump.

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Matthew Craven’s Archaeological Collages

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Artist Matthew Craven primarily works in collage.  His work, however, diverges from a lot of typical collage styles.  Craven doesn’t juxtapose found imagery to create an effect from the contrast.  Rather, he sources imagery of what seems to be ancient archaeological artifacts.  The black and white images resemble the photographs of old issues of National Geographic.  Further, the way Craven assembles the images doesn’t seem an attempt to draw disparities.  Instead, he almost appears to categorizing objects, setting up classifications without labeling.  Still, his work is fine art and not an exercise in archaeology.  Craven doesn’t offer easy conclusions – there is no simple reading of history to be gotten in his work.  Rather, Craven looks back at history with his collaged images as art does.  It underscores the difficulty in reducing human history to one accurate narrative.  The gallery statement of his current solo exhibit at DCKT Contemporary further explains:

“Archaeological remains and ruins act as backdrops for forming crypto-historical collages and drawings. Images from lost cultures, relics and landscapes both well-known and extremely ambiguous create the patterns within the works. The results are compositions that highlight a new connection to our past in an aesthetic that is intended to be both cinematic in scope and visionary in perspective.  Understanding that our view of history is deeply flawed and inherently biased, we are left with a puzzle of strange pieces. Oblivious Path combines these puzzle pieces into a new framework. Some of these pieces appear to fit together despite thousands of years and tens of thousands miles separating these ancient civilizations. Using source materials from historical texts, Oblivious Path scrambles our current notions of space and time. The powerful images we are left with cannot be reinterpreted, translated or disregarded. What is left was carved in stone. It is permanent. They are our sacred truths.”  ( via the jealous curator)

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Dan McPharlin’s Sci Fi Illustrations Of Past FUtures

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Dan McPharlin
 is an illustrator who is concerned with the “future past or past future,” as he notes on his webpage. His artwork live in a realm of speculative reality, where space is the final frontier — or perhaps the first of a civilization beginning to rebuild itself.
There are dystopian touches in his illustrations: in one, an astronaut gazes on temple ruins; in another, we see the haggard remnants of a bridge that looks like it used to be golden. It’s a little reminiscent of the final scenes of Planet of the Apes, a familiar monument from a world long lost. McPharlin’s work utilizes rich colors that are once neon yet muted. His palette is one that includes the golden rod yellow of futuristic smog as well as the earth tones of somewhere decidedly not-Earth. There is certainly a quality of nostalgia to his work, though for what, we don’t necessarily know.
“These are the worlds of dreams and half-memories,” McPharlin says on his webpage. “The collision zone of past-futures and futures-past, derived from blueprints laid down decades earlier on the pages of battered sci-fi paperbacks, fantasy art books, and mid-century design quarterlies.” (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

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The Unsettling Sculptures Of Sasha Vinci Drip Flesh And Carnage From Their Bodies

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The nightmarish sculptures of Italian artist Sasha Vinci are both alluring and unsettling. With the human body often being his subject, his work portrays a sense of longing, a palpable sense of a tormented soul. Having work with titles like The Eternal Wait and You Are Here You Exist, the suffering of human existence is strongly felt. Ripe with emotion, his mutated figures look for a sense of belonging in the world. His fleshy subjects seem to have skin that melts off their feet and hands, binding the two together. Vinci’s subjects are trapped by means of their own body, perhaps a metaphor for humanity’s own self-destructive nature.

Although monochromatic, we can almost see the color of flesh and blood absent in many of his sculptures. In his artwork titled The Eternal Wait, the drips of flesh coming down from the entire body add an intensely graphic, carnal element that is extremely alarming.  We cannot see the face in this or any of Sasha Vinci’s figures, adding another layer of isolation to these already lonely creatures. One of Vinci’s more disturbing sculptures is The Hung, where a person’s body, or what’s left of it, is being hung. The body has been disfigured, with half of its limbs missing from its faceless body. The artist’s work forms a truly ominous atmosphere that draws you in while at the same time chilling you to the bone. Sasha Vinci, being a multi-talented artist, also creates work in mediums such as installations, performance, painting, drawing, and writing.
(via Hi Fructose)

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