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Aoi Kotsuhiroi

Wet Moon - Aoi Kotsuhiroi

Aoi Kotsuhiroi’s Wet Moon collection is quite dark — made up of real human hair, crystals and pit fired ceramic skulls her “body ornaments” merge high-end fashion with Gothic craft. I love these pieces, and am surprisingly not put off by the use of real human hair, I’m impressed by how versatile hair is and how it can be transformed in many different pieces.

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Up for the Down Stroke

Picture-1-600x652 Up for the Down Stroke is the title of a new exhibition of paintings by artist David Leggett.

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Dave Mead’s Beard Portraits

Dave Mead - Photography
Dave Mead is an Austin based editorial photographer of exceptional skill, and he has used his powers for good by photographing some of the greatest beards the world has ever seen.

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Christopher Locke’s Heartless Machines

Christopher Locke‘s sculptures combine meticulous craftsmanship and a nerdy sense of humor. My favorites are his spiders made from scissors confiscated by airport security.

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Jon Jaylo

 

Enter Jon Jaylo’s dream world where surreal images that are equal parts playful and thought-provokingnspill out straight out of his subconscious.

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Design Month: Stonepeak Ceramics


If you’ve ever renovated a home you know how challenging it is to find floor coverings that fit in with your Eames Eiffel chairs and Eli Walker paintings. And if you’re looking for something that’s made in the USA, great quality and environmentally friendly, it’s an even greater challenge. That’s where Stonepeak Ceramics comes in, they offer Italian quality tiles made in the USA using advanced technology to reduce waste and even carry a Greenguard certification.

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Nicola Samori Scratches The Surface Of His Dark And Intense Paintings To Unveil Previous Layers Of Work

Nicola Samori - Painting 1 Nicola Samori - Painting 2 Nicola Samori - Painting 3 Nicola Samori - Painting 7

The work of Nicola Samori depicts dying corpses and mysterious portraits scraped, scratched and torn on the surface, unveiling layers of contrasting paint. Dark and intense paintings, covering layers of existing work, like flesh covering the accumulation of past experiences and traumas. The artist chooses to damage his previous paintings on purpose. He feeds the canvas, daily; until the texture becomes ’intense and palpable’. Using his fingers or a knife to destroy the apparent layer, the result of what feels like a painful process is a magnificent harmonized agony. By scraping his paintings, Nicola Samori tries to search for true identity. A person’s face on a painting is not a valid representation of who this person really is. It doesn’t give a true essence of its inner personality and soul. Exploring what’s underneath the surface is the purpose of the artist.

Body, death and painting are, for Nicola Samori, subjects of obsession. By punishing the three altogether on the canvas, he opens the wound and sets himself free. His layered macabre creations are the structure for his catharsis (act or process of releasing a strong emotion into an art form or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration).
Apart from the fact that the artist doesn’t fancy working with colors, according to him; the source of darkness does not reflect a state or a belonging; what is made from it is what’s interesting. A rough process symbolizing metamorphosis of deep emotions into meaningful and empowering art pieces

Nicola Samori’s work will be exhibited at Galerie Eigen+Art Leipzig in Berlin until September 2015. (via Empty Kingdom)

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The Big Dig- A hole Dug From Germany To China

Some ideas are so ridiculous that you have to make them a reality. For instance Berlin’s Open Urban Space design team Topotek1, asked the question “what if we dug a hole all the way to china?” This simple but absurd question lead to the creation of The Big Dig, an overzealous dig whose opening emerges  in the 2011 XI’AN garden show. This massive installation not only looks amazing but also had a clever audio component that further drove home the concept. Riffing off the megaphone like shape of the hole Topotek1 created a soundtrack of sounds from Argentina, The United States, Sweden, and Germany that would emit from the hole creating the feeling that you could hear sounds from the other end of the hole. These soundtracks piqued the imagination of the visitors, transferring them away from china, away from the garden, away from the hole, and to the other side of the world. ( via jobs wife)

 

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