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Aoi Kotsuhiroi

Wet Moon - Aoi Kotsuhiroi

Aoi Kotsuhiroi’s Wet Moon collection is quite dark — made up of real human hair, crystals and pit fired ceramic skulls her “body ornaments” merge high-end fashion with Gothic craft. I love these pieces, and am surprisingly not put off by the use of real human hair, I’m impressed by how versatile hair is and how it can be transformed in many different pieces.

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David Jay’s Portraits Of Injured Soldiers Expose The Impact Of War On Individual Lives

David Jay - Photography David Jay - Photography David Jay - Photography David Jay - Photography

In a powerful series of black-and-white portraits entitled The Unknown Soldier, New York-based photographer David Jay captures the devastation of war and the marks it leaves on individual lives. The project began while David was shooting The SCAR Project, a documentation of breast cancer survivors. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were in full tilt, and David decided that the public needed to see the intimate, bodily consequences of a system that perpetuates the mass injury and destruction of human lives.

Photographed at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the Brooke Army Medical Center, The Unknown Soldier features men and women who have been shot, struck by roadside bombs, and severely burned — stories of trauma which are bravely told by their scars and amputations. The essence of the photos, however, lies in the enduring strengths conveyed in each face as the individual confronts the viewer with their experience. In a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, David explains the greater aim of his project:

“[U]ltimately, The Unknown Soldier is not about war. It is about many things: Humanity, acceptance, responsibility. An understanding that [what] we do matters. What we say, what we think, matters . . . and [it] has repercussions that quite literally change the course of history.”

In a world where media coverage often turns injuries and deaths into abstract numbers, David has brought human subjects deeply into focus. Seeing these surviving soldiers evokes a sense of social responsibility that extends from the people we know in our immediate lives to those engaged in war. The Unknown Soldier reminds everyone that soldiers are not faceless causalities, and even though people may feel distant from such violent events, there exists a vital responsibility to examine and criticize a system and media that imperils and objectifies human lives. As David continues:

“I hope the images transcend the narrow and simplistic confines of ‘war’ and encourage us to examine the way we engage each other — both friend and stranger — at its most basic, day to day level, as it is these subtle, seemingly innocuous interactions that will ultimately lead us either to peace . . . or the continuum and carnage of war.”

Visit David Jay’s website to see more photos from The Unknown Soldier, as well as his other projects. (Via Feature Shoot)

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Dwayne Bell

Scottish illustrator Dwayne Bell recently launched his portfolio full the brim with analog and digital works.

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Ria Brodell

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Self-Portrait as Freddie Mercury, circa 1985

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Self Portrait as Miami Vice Dude

Artist Ria Brodell aspired to don Freddy Mercury’s tight white jeans and signature ‘stache, and the Miami Vice Dude’s cool calypso-linen pantsuit rather than play princess or tea party. What I love most about her achingly sincere self-portraits posing as dubious icons of masculinity is the tangled web of complications it weaves. What does it mean for a queer woman to paint herself in goache as Carey Grant, a gay man playing a straight man in sexuality-restricted 1950’s Hollywood? Hmm….what do you guys think? Any of you boys rather play with Barbie than GI Joe’s?

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Design Month: Wacom Inkling

We can’t talk design without talking about the products that make it all happen. When I first heard of Wacom’s forthcoming Inkling I could barely contain my excitement at the possibilities. It works on an up to A4 size paper, you can draw in layers and importing into your computer seems seamless. Imagine what you could do in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator with this tool? My current Wacom Intuos is a permanent fixture and I can’t imagine working in Adobe Illustrator without it.

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Miljohn Ruperto Creates Engimatic Photographs From Mysterious Manuscript Featuring Aliens, Mayans, And More

Miljohn Ruperto Photography

Miljohn Ruperto Photography

Miljohn Ruperto Photography

Miljohn Ruperto Photography

The subject of Miljohn Ruperto‘s work in the recent 2014 Whitney Biennial is taken from the mysterious Voynich manuscript. Dating back to the 15th century, the book contains indecipherable text, whose authorship, has been credited throughout history to aliens, ancient Mayans, and long forgotten tribes. It repeatedly stumps the brightest scholars and laymen making it one of the greatest and most misunderstood academic mysteries of all time. The only clues to its origins lie in 126 unidentified botanical studies accompanying the text. The illustrations of plants and figures, drawn in a weirdly fantastical style, tell a story which seem to mirror life’s age old mysteries. The project involving Ruperto and his collaborator, Ulrik Heltoft began by making 3D models of the plants, which were then photographed and transferred onto black and white analog film.

The end result, is a series of creepy snap shots recalling old hollywood publicity stills. Creakily formed branches and stems appear as strange appendages, as the plants take on otherworldly shapes illuminated by sinister shadows. The staging of Voynich’s botany not only becomes haunting and striking but everlasting, offering the viewer a mostly cinematic experience. An ongoing project, it will continue with the duo creating new photos of the specimens accompanied by large paintings of an enigmatic planet known as 55 canri e. 55 cancri e is part of the cancri planetary system which revolves around our sun. Astrophysicists have suggested it might be composed entirely out of diamonds. This came to light after studies found when the planet passed in front of the sun, it absorbed an enormous amount of energy. However, much like the Voynich and due to its enormous distance from earth shall probably only remain escapist fodder for our intellectual pursuits.

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Robert Landau’s Photographs Of Larger Than Life Rock ‘n’ Roll Billboards On The Sunset Strip In The 1960’s

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Robert Landau - Photography

Photographer Robert Landau captured stunning rock ‘n’ roll billboards in the late ’60s and ’70s. Primarily inspired by album art, the billboards were massive monuments that took on a life of their own. Reigning over the Sunset Strip, which was at the time the lifeblood of the music industry, the billboards became more than just advertisements. They were physical embodiments of a vibrant scene populated by colorful rock stars and tantalizing music idols. 

In an interview with Collectors Weekly, Landau says, “There was a whole scene going on along the Strip, but it was really focused on rock ’n’ roll. The billboards captured all that energy, and also some of the excess of money and drugs.” The billboards themselves were anything but flat; at the time, they were hand painted using specific techniques to ensure they could be read from a distance.
Around the time billboards roamed the streets was also the height of some true album art artistry. “It was a joint process,” Landau says of the intersection of the two, “… in most cases, the musicians had already commissioned amazing artwork for their albums.” The tricky part was then translating the album art from a square sleeve to the more traditional rectangular frame of a billboard. The solution was to add an extra dimension to it, enabling figures and objects to burst out of the picture and become almost 3D in effect. Billboard artists got creative, lighting up 3D lampshades and creating silhouettes that seemed to loom like titans.
“It wasn’t about getting somebody to a cash register to buy something,” Landau says, commenting on the uniqueness of these everyday artworks. “It was about creating an image, and about a trust between the artist and the record companies.”
Even as people bemoan the death of the album, at least there are photos like Landau’s that remind us of a time when music was larger than life.
Landau’s work will be on exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles starting on March 24th. (via Collectors Weekly)

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Falko Ohlmer

Posters and illustrations by graphic designer Falko Ohlmer.

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