Jeremy Pettis

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A graduate of the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design, Jeremy Pettis is an up-and-coming graphic designer specializing in a sort of 1970s American style hand-drawn typography. As his 2007 thesis project, Jeremy created a sort of logotype for 26 different animals (A-Z), attempting to evoke certain characteristics of each animal through clever visual cues and tricks.

Interactive Music Video by Champagne Valentine

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Champagne Valentine, an Amsterdam based digital new media creative boutique, recently created this amazing interactive music video for Placebo’s “The Never-Ending Why.” The video takes viewers on a fanciful, creature-filled trip. Sort of a mix between Tibetan-mandalic psychedelia and French turn of the century daguerreotypes. Stunning! And the best part is that you can control the scenery and monsters by pointing and clicking your mouse! I am constantly amazed by the breaking of boundaries between viewer/media, and I feel like this video bridges the gap in a playful fashion….fitting for the performative aspect of a rock band. Click here to interact with the video- some stills after the jump!

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Creative storytelling with A Shufflebook

A Shufflebook
Designed and authored by Richard Hefter, Martin Stephen Moskof, A Shufflebook is a nonstructured reading and storytelling “book” which is designed to offer children maximum variety and flexibility of image grouping. The 52 illustrated cards can be arranged to make an endless number of word and picture stories.

Marius Watz

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Norwegian artist Marius Watz uses Processing and other programming languages to explore the effects of different rule-based systems on virtual space. The finished product may be printed, sculpted, or a video.

Interview: Jeff Eisenberg

Jeff Eisenberg

Jeff Eisenberg creates almost Rorschach-like images that hover somewhere between structural vector flights of futuristic fancy and strange biomorphic organisms. Conducted on multiple layers of mylar, they could almost be strange architectural blueprints for a sci-fi movie. He also works in the less common medium of sound installation. All inspired by automatic-writing creative exercises, the works have a strange, abstracted linguistic impulse. Read the full interview detailing Jeff’s studio practice, sources of inspiration and his unique brainstorming process.

Will Bryant

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Will Bryant is a designer who excels at following design trends. His use of triangles is both ironic and non-ironic. He also has an illustration style that is very reminiscent of a lot of other illustrators working today. Overall, Mr. Bryant is fantastic at creating work following the lead of a select few trendsetters.

Sebastian Lester

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Here’s one for all you typography nerds out there: Londoner graphic designer Sebastian Lester is a typographer, doing freelance work for clients such as GQ, Dell, and the New York Times. He seems to specialize in this sort of formal loopy script stuff, which I find quite impressive. If you like his work, you can buy high quality prints of some of his designs here, though it’d probably help to be British if you want to buy them, cause the exchange rate from dollars to pounds isn’t so good.

JeongMee Yoon

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JeongMee Yoon’s current work, “The Pink and Blue Projects” explores the trends in cultural preferences and the differences in the tastes of children (and their parents) from diverse cultures, ethnic groups as well as gender socialization and identity. The work also raises other issues, such as the relationship between gender and consumerism, urbanization, the globalization of consumerism and the new capitalism. The topic seems to be well tread territory already but it’s still crazy to visualize. Some of the poses that these kids strike are interesting too.