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Collapsable Shelters Provide Protection From The Elements On The Go

CHAT TRAVIESO

CHAT TRAVIESOCHAT TRAVIESO

Brooklyn, NY based artist and architectural designer Chat Travieso creates playful and interactive urban interventions that encourage people to question their assumptions of the built environment. His work takes the form of design/build installations that promote resourceful and sustainable strategies with a stress on simplicity, reuse, and making-do tactics. This work acknowledges the social and physical context of a site and often considers the existing spaces and objects in our urban landscape as a resource to be appropriated and repurposed.

Our favorite works by him are the amusing collapsable shelters pictured here.

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Jose Manuel Hortelano-Pi

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Madrid based illustrator, Jose Manuel Hortelano-Pi, creates these wonderfully detailed pen and watercolor works. I for one especially enjoy his black and white drawings (like the above.)

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Motoi Yamamoto’s Newest Installation Made From Carefully Poured Salt

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Motoi Yamamoto installation3

Artist Motoi Yamamoto is known for his sprawling installations entirely composed of carefully poured salt.  His newest installation Charlotte, North Carolina’s Mint Museum is titled Floating Garden.  Existing for slightly under a month, the community was invited to ‘dismantle’ the installation.  A huge swirling pattern, one familiar from nature, covers the floor.  Upon closer inspection, the hurricane-like shape is a tight network of neat lines of salt.  Salt is replete with symbolism in Western culture but has special meaning in Japanese culture.  The museum explains:

“Salt, a traditional symbol for purification and mourning in Japanese culture, is used in funeral rituals and by sumo wrestlers before matches. It is frequently placed in small piles at the entrance to restaurants and other businesses to ward off evil spirits and to attract benevolent ones. Motoi forged a connection to the substance while mourning the death of his sister, at the age of twenty-four, from brain cancer, and began to create art out of salt in an effort to preserve his memories of her.” [via]

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Wyatt Grant’s elusive narratives

 

I have been a close friend of Chicago-based artist Wyatt Grant since we studied together at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he blew me away with his 20+ layer screen prints on fabric. He graduated this past May with me, having worked fluidly between sculpture, print media, and painting. His works fuse a personal alphabet with a warm, dedicated aesthetic that is consistent throughout all of his work, both abstract and representational. The works have a rose-tinted magical realism to them, a narrative that is both specific and achingly mysterious. Wyatt is also a musician, producing shoegaze-y acoustic tunes studded with electronic loops under the name Pool Holograph.  More after the jump.

 

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Carole Epps

02CEPPEnter the miniature world of Carole Epps.  Sinister. Cute. Dark. Mysterious. Wabbits & Mickey Mouse.  Seems like a fun and slightly scary world to live in.  I wouldn’t mind staying for a while.

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Cecilia Paredes’ Wallflowers

Peruvian artist Cecilia Paredes gives new meaning to the term “wallflower.” In her recent collection of photographs, entitled “Landscapes,” Paredes seamlessly disappears into a dizzying array of patterned wallpapers, using only paint and, in some cases, simple costumes to complete the transformation. Paredes’ self-painting is so precise that, oftentimes, the only hint of her presence is a flash of sleek brown hair or a pair of gleaming white eyes peering out from the background. Through this disappearing act, Paredes explores themes of displacement and migration, illustrating the difficulties of blending in to new surroundings without completely casting off one’s roots. 

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Nancy Liang’s Subtly Magical Hand-Drawn GIFs

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang‘s GIFs and illustrations are peaceful and full of quiet wonder. Much like the imaginings of Chris Van Allsburg in his book “The Mysteries of Harris Burdick,” Liang’s work captures moments from larger stories. They depict scenes of midnight contemplation as well as magic of a subtler flavor: an upside down house surrounded by snow floating up toward the moon; a boat drifting down an empty street; a small child accompanied by a ghostly spirit animal. These are only ghosts and flights of fancy that evoke the shape and landscape of a wider fantasy world that intersects with ours in the shadows.

According to her artist’s statement, Liang “often explores social and cultural narratives in an ironic, metaphoric and emotive way.” These narratives are especially clear in her illustrations that shine a light on suburban life and escapism. The paper textures and lines of graphite bring a storybook quality to her artwork that makes them seem childlike and gives them a kind of universal accessiblity. (via I Need a Guide)

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Angelika Arendt’s Bright and Intricate Clay Sculptures

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Angelika Arendt creates her vivid sculptures out of a variety of materials. Arendt often twists and shapes polymer clay to form dripping and swirling patterns, but also uses foam, wood, and acrylic paint to fashion similar forms that are rich in texture and movement. These intricate patterns lend her work an organic touch, something psychedelically oceanic, perhaps. A quick look at her illustrations reveals her incredible ability to transform intricate two-dimensional designs into three-dimensional models. Arendt lives and works in Berlin.

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