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C W Wells’ miniature world

C W Wells

C W Wells’ sculptures and works on paper are ambassadors that have spilled out from her private world, mere fragments of a vast and complex oeuvre. Her studio and home in South Philadelphia is an archive, kept well stocked with an arsenal of supplies like brushes, clays, glazes, toys, molds, tiny clothes, dolls, and tchochkes. Action figures designed by artists Marcel Dzama and R. Crumb share shelf space with Gumby, Yogi Bear, and other old-school cartoon personalities. There are model trains and dollhouse miniatures, paint-by-numbers, vintage collectables, and two live bunnies. They also remind me of that episode in CSI Las Vegas (the “miniature killer”)…

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Douglas Kelley Show: Barnaby Whitfield Interview

B/D has been a fan of Barnaby Whitfield’s work since we featured him way back in issue X. We’re totally in love with his beautifully rendered and grotesquely exquisite pastels but were surprised to find that he is dabbling in the world of performance. Watch Barnaby’s performance as well as a informal roundtable discussion about the performance and his work in this video for the Douglas Kelley Show. Keep up the good work Barnaby!

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Water Transformed Into Wigs For The Bald

To all our bald readers: we may have a new solution for you. Water Wigs is a new photography experiment by action photographer, Tim Tadder. The series consists of high-speed still frame images from a photo shoot that combines bald men with buckets of water. The images are snapped right at the moment the water hits the head to create a hair-like form. Take a look at some of our favorites from this extensive series after the jump.

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Joel Tretin Makes Jokes With His Camera

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Joel Tretin calls himself a Photo Humorist and that description seems perfectly apt. His photo series Stranger in Paradox “looks at what’s true and totally screws with it.” At first glance, the pictures seem deceptively straightforward—portraits of the city shot in a somewhat generic ad-agency aesthetic. Hidden in plain sight are the visual jokes: a parking ticket on the windshield on a sports car in a building height ad; a carousel over a revolving door; an elephant walking though the green murkiness of a subway. The Photoshop manipulations are mostly seamless—it really looks like that woman is pushing an eight-seat stroller, and that sporty yellow cab looks real next to its stodgier brother. A stack of cars make the most of a lone parking space.

The subtlest images make you work for them. A lit Wall Street façade, American flags… oh, there. The don’t walk sign is flipping the bird. The traffic sign points to the “Road Most Taken” an apparent play on Robert Frost’s Road Less Taken.

Photo manipulation in art is often used to create surreal imagery. And these pictures are surreal in that they portray things that are unreal and often fantastic, but the photos lack the intention and technique that transform pictures into fine art. Which seems to be just fine with Trentin, who says:

I am a failed stand up comedian, who now tries to make people laugh through photography.

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Kimchi And Chips Transforms Light And Mist Into Mesmerizing Morphing Geometry

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Kimchi and Chips is a design studio that creates 3-D installations using light in a variety of ways. Their most recent project is Light Barrier, where they project morphing shapes like circles and pyramids on mist. Their aim is to “add to the visual language of space and light” which they deliver. The shapes appear and disappear slowly, fading away into each other in time to sounds. It’s mesmerizing to watch, and you’re conscious that this is truly something you would never be able to see or possibly even envision without the advanced technologies we have today.

In another of their projects, Lunar Surface, they create orbs of light that look like moons. The moons are imposed on photographs of industrial room (maybe within the Kimchi and Chips studio?) so it looks as if they exist within those spaces. The moon shapes are created using an interesting approach. A sheet is set up with fans on it so it will move. A projection of the circumference of a circle is set up on the sheet, and a sensor picks up the movement of the sheet so that they create the shape of the moons. Once again, the shapes create a new visual language. They seem like jellyfish orbs floating in air. (Via Artlog)

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Emilio @ Year of the Ox @ GR2

Heres a chance to meet renowned artist (and B/D fave) Emilio this saturday at Giant Robot2 as well as other great artsts at Giant Robot2 on Sawtelle. He will be presenting his latest works as part of the Year of the Ox show. 

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Aircondition

Artists and designers aren’t neccessarily known for coming up with the next dance craze but Oliver Laric is certainly giving it the ol’ college try. Watch Oliver bust a move after the jump!

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E. Deutchman’s Portraits of Presidents with Boobs on Their Faces

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George Washington

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George W. Bush

Ronald Raegan

Ronald Raegan

James Madison

James Madison

Emily Deutchman’s “Presidents with Boob Faces” are exactly what it sounds like: a collection of paintings of the United States presidents with breasts appended to their facial features. After graduating from Skidmore College, the young artist found herself doodling human mammary glands on portraits of her friends, and she soon extended the project to historic leaders of the free world. With the exception of Obama’s portrait, which is modeled after the iconic “Change” poster, each piece is based off of its subject’s official presidential portrait. The facial features of each man dictates the placement of the breasts. For Ronald Reagan, it’s skin above the neck. For Clinton, it’s the nose. Some of the boobs are painted from actual breasts, sent to the artist by friends.

While Deutchman insists that the work has no clear agenda aside from humor, she invites political interpretations. With the expected candidacy of Hillary Clinton in 2016, dialogues on women in politics have come to the fore, and we are asked to consider the gender inequality that persists in the upper echelons of power. There are few art pieces that exude the machismo of the presidential portrait, and in adding female sex organs to the idealized masculine visage, the artist subverts our notion of national power and authority. Deutchman’s use of pastel-toned watercolors heighten the feminine softness inherent in the work. A more naughty glance at the work renders it a scathing satire of contemporary politics and the corruption of high offices. Take a look. (via Lost at E Minor)

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