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Our Future Perfect Contest Has Ended!

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Thanks to all the artists who submitted work to our Future Perfect call for submissions. We had well over 250 submissions for every single state in the US varying in medium from kinetic installations to drawings. It’s going to be extremely difficult to select only 70 artists from all the amazing submissions. In the next week we will be contacting artists who have made it into the book as well as announcing the grand winner who will get their very own exclusive interview in Beautiful/Decay Book: 6. Thanks to our sponsor Toyota Prius Projects for working with us to make the Future Perfect book happen and to promote and support new and emerging artists!

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Masao Kinoshita’s Powerful Sculptures Are Skinned To Reveal Hulking Muscles

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With rippling, coiled muscles, the sculptures of Masao Kinoshita stand skinned and erect. Working with materials ranging from wood to resin to bronze, the Japanese sculptor uses an aesthetic we normally associate with natural history museums to render athletic, flexing creatures of the sea and land. Save for their multiple heads and engorged limbs, these beasts could easily be ancestors of man.

Kinoshita draws much of his inspiration from diverse mythologies, religions and folklores from around the globe. Fusing narratives across space and time, the horned maenads of ancient Greece live alongside the Yoga Asura deities of Buddhism in a visceral, animalistic universe where fitness reigns supreme. The Hindu god Ganesh poses confidently while a human baby and a small teddy bear develop muscles of similar size and strength.

Given the artist’s knowledge of folklore and spiritual histories, we might interpret his massive, hulking walrus as a nod to the beast mentioned in Alice in Wonderland, who is widely assumed to represent the Buddha. Built from wood, he would certainly seem at home in the story of “The Walrus and the Carpenter,” but his soulful eyes maintain a divine dignity that eluded Lewis Carroll’s infamous character.

Throughout Kinoshita’s impressive body of work, the physical and the metaphysical are allowed to coexist. Where modern religions condemn the pleasures of the body and exalt in those of the spirit, these sculptures present a world wherein the gods themselves are proud—even arrogant, as the case may be with those thong-wearing bodybuilders—to live within mortal anatomies. Take a look. (via HiFructose)

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Ben Schumacher

"Head For The Stoic," wood,veneer, jeans, concrete, streamed video loop -"emo blowjob" 2009

"Head For The Stoic," wood,veneer, jeans, concrete, streamed video loop "emo blowjob" 2009

Ben Schumacher creates art in many traditional and non tradition forms, whether it be through drawings or exploring new ways to conceptualize and present art via and about the internet with an ironic sense of humor that could only have been developed by long hours mulling over the way we use and relate to the tools specific to our cyberspace generation. Ahh, the day I’m tired of it is the day I’m dead!

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Next Day Flyers Presents: FiZZZ BZZZZ!

FiZZZ BZZZZ! is a French and German design studio with some fantastic book design and illustration. My favorite works are the children book covers pictured above with die cut eye balls. Maybe we should toss some eyeballs on the next b/d book?

 

FiZZZ BZZZZ! is presented by Next Day Flyers who make brochure printing easy and affordable. For fast poster printing services, order online.

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Sculptor Dirk Staschke’s Morbid Recreations Of Classical Still Lifes Critique Vanity And Excessive Desire

"Swan Song" (2009). Ceramic and mixed media.

“Swan Song” (2009). Ceramic and mixed media.

"Translation #1" (2014). Ceramic, wood, leather, epoxy.

“Translation #1″ (2014). Ceramic, wood, leather, epoxy.

"Translation #1" (2014). Rear view.

“Translation #1″ (2014). Rear view.

"Cataclysm" (2009). Ceramic.

“Cataclysm” (2009). Ceramic.

Dirk Staschke is a sculptor who knows how to stimulate the appetite while also turning the stomach. Drawing on the 16th century artistic tradition of vanitas — referring to morbid still life paintings from Northern Europe that depicted arrangements of bones, decaying fruit, and hourglasses — Staschke creates ceramic mountains of pastries and piles of organ meats and root vegetables. Initially, the soft colors and glistening glazes make the cornucopias seem innocent or even beautiful. However, like vanitas (“vanity” in Latin) — which symbolize the futility of life and the temporary nature of all earthly materials — Staschke’s works critique the fleeting and destructive power of human desire. Beautiful abundance becomes disturbing; the skinned animals and raw meats, although carefully arranged, remind us of our own bodily death and decay. Even the sweet pastries — flesh-toned and topped with a cherry — become gross and oddly cannibalistic, representing an insatiable urge to horde and consume that ends in self-destruction.

Not all of Staschke’s works are so obviously grotesque. In a series titled Translation, he features framed sculptural still lifes of flowers (in addition to the more obviously macabre meat arrangements). The 3D medium, however, unveils the compositions’ inner vanity and morbidity; look behind the sculptures, and you will see messy hollows, buttresses, and layers of sculpted construction. An appealing and seemingly flawless work of art becomes a false edifice for a grim and roughly-hewn interior. Whether comprising ceramic flowers or flesh, Staschke’s works demonstrate how beautified desires cover up an earthly reality of transience and rot.

Visit Staschke’s website to see more detailed images of his creations. He exhibited recently at Winston Wächter in Seattle, and you can see his artist page here.

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Ramon Coronado

RAMÓN CORONADO

Ramon Coronado is an independent, cross-media visual designer based out of Los Angeles. I saw his work at the Art Center Undergraduate Graduation show and noticed it immediately due to Ramon’s clean and professional presentation. I really liked his Mercado Negro project (after the jump), a 2 week on-taking that deals with reclaiming an ordinary, everyday object and transforming it into a whole new object.

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Manmade Hermit Crab Shells Mimic Human Buildings

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Aki Inomata sculpture3

Artist Aki Inomata asks “Why not hand over a “shelter” to hermit crabs?”  and this is exactly what she does.  Inomata carefully scanned the structure of shells used by hermit crabs and took note of their specific needs.  Then using 3D modeling software she created new “homes” for these crabs.  Drawing a connection between humans and the hermit crabs, Inomata decorated the shells with human structures and dwellings.  Somewhat similar to humans, the crabs out grow their shells and must look for new shelter.  The project underscores the basic need of a place to live, regardless of the seeming complexity behind the issue.

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Painful Photographs Of Japanese Tsunami Survivors

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In March 2011, an earthquake and tsunami struck Japan causing widespread damage and destruction across the country. The fishing town of Otsuchi along the Sanriku Coast was hit especially hard, with 60-foot tall waves destroying 60% of the town. Argentinian photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg heard about the devastation in Otsuchi from the curator of an exhibit of his work in Tokyo in 2012. Upon visiting Otsuchi, Chaskielberg discovered large mountains of debris and places that were visibly demolished. Because Otsuchi is such a small town, the photographer easily found people whose homes were destroyed, most of them living in small temporary housing units. For his “Otsuchi Future Memory” series, Chaskielberg had some of the town’s inhabitants pose inside their now destroyed homes or work places during the night, taking black and white long exposure photographs of his subjects. He’d then use the color palette of decayed photographs found in an album among the ruins to color the his portraits.

Chaskielberg says, “It’s a reflection on the tragedy as a whole—the losses, the memory—and my way of seeing the world. These historic images are the bridge to the past I create through the use of colors…These photographs speak to the way the Otsuchi inhabitants decided to record their lives. From my viewpoint, I try to build a story about the city and its people.”

This method results in haunting and surreal photographs, ones that almost appear strangely collaged or layered, but are only enhanced with color and lighting. (via slate)

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