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RARE Presents: Mark Dean Veca’s Psychedelic Pop Culture Apparel

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For years Mark Dean Veca has been painstakingly painting ornate and intricate patterns on canvases as well as walls across the US. Using a mix of references that run the gamut from 60’s psychedelic art to 90’s graffiti, Veca has managed to create an alternate world where his signature technique takes 2-D graphics and breathes new life into them.

Primarily known as a painter, Veca doesn’t hold himself to only paint and brush. For over a decade he has collaborated with some of the best brands in the world creating iconic apparel and product illustrations for the likes of Nike, Lucasfilms and Burton; so it should come as no surprise that he recently teamed up with curated online marketplace RARE to create a new signature line of apparel featuring the imagery that he has become known for.

Veca’s first collection of apparel with RARE includes bold color ways and patterns covering every square inch of the garments. You can get patriotic with the Godsmith , Flag II, and Merica II tees. If bending your mind is your thing you can toss on Veca’s The Duke shirt which takes inspiration from Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas. Last but not least lets not forget everyones favorite theme, Money! Ladies can look fresh in the Red Leg$ leggings while the guys can spread the wealth with the Monopoly inspired Penny Bag backpack that has room for all your cash as well as your laptop!

Check out the complete collection on Mark’s RARE shop and learn more about Mark Dean Veca’s artwork and clothing by watching the above video.

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Chen Long-Bin’s Meticulously Crafted Book Sculptures

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“In my artwork I always use printed matter – discarded books, magazines, and computer printouts; the cultural debris of our information society.  The sculptures I create reference Eastern and Western icons and intellectual figures, thereby exploring cultural meanings and concepts. I always use text in my work and the content of the texts are relevant to my sculptures. My finished sculptures often seem to be wood or marble, though they consist of paper. They are constructed in such a way that the various parts fit together in a seamless manner.” – Chen Long-Bin, from Volta NY

 

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Graphic Designer Dreams Up A Product Perfect For Women Who Have PMS

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Texas-based graphic designer Parker Jones has come up with a cheeky and clever idea to help women suffering from mood swings and cravings during ‘that time of the month’. Her college project features different fictional flavors of PMS Ice Cream. Named after moods and emotions that she herself has been a victim of, Jones has come up with some witty names. “Don’t Come Near Me” is a tub full of chocolatey rocky road and nuts. It also features a scale marked on the side showing how much you have eaten. Victims of PMS can eat their way through anger, rage, whining, crying, anxiety and laughter again and again until they reach the bottom of the container.

The series also features “I Need Some More” – which is full of mint chocolate chips, and “I Think I’m Dying” – a sweet strawberry flavor. The strawberry package bears a countdown of sorts, listing the different days and the various things women tell themselves to get through the monthly process:

Day One: it’s only just begun
Day Two: hell is coming
Day Three: can’t turn back now
Day Four: only a few more days
Day Five: dear god make it stop
Day Six: please tell me it’s over
Day Seven: sweet relief

Parker’s fictional products are sure to make women (and men) who are familiar with the different stages of PMS laugh. As I’m sure we all know, sometimes PMS can be no laughing matter. It definitely is a shame that this ice cream isn’t available to buy…. (Via DeMilked)

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105 Pariis

105 Pariis is the portfolio of  Dusseldorf, Germany based designer Enis Maksutovski. Enis effortlessly changes gears across a wide array of mediums from video, illustration, and photography with ease bringing us candy coated visuals that pack a powerful punch. More of his works after the jump.

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Jason Hackenwerth

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Wow! Jason Hackenwerth brings a whole new meaning to the term balloon animal. His creations are more akin to balloon creatures resembling, perhaps, lifeforms of the deep sea or lifeforms viewed under a microscope. Conceived from the artist’s imagination, beautifully sketched, and sometimes consisting of more that a hundred individual balloons, these sculptures take life within the large spaces of museums, galleries, the street, and, if you’re lucky, right before your eyes as a performance piece. I’m particularly fond of the wearable art… how’s that for a party outfit!?

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Cai Guo-Qiang


Cai Guo-Qiang was born in 1957 in Quanzhou City, Fujian Province, China. He was trained in stage design at the Shanghai Drama Institute were he initially began working with gunpowder to foster spontaneity and confront the suppression that he felt from the controlled artistic tradition and social climate in China at the time. Pretty bomb. Check out some of his work after the jump.

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Joan Ross Forges New Paintings Out Of Century-Old Works

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Australian artist Joan Ross manipulates paintings created by someone else, adding her own touches of highlighter yellow and fluoro orange. Sometimes, she animates these paintings. As Ross does this she simultaneously references a bevy of themes. They include the following: our attempt to civilize nature, imperialism, consumerism, our throwaway culture, global warming, tagging, naming, and claiming. It’s a tall order to engage these all of these things, so Ross uses historical paintings as a starting place.

Specifically, she uses the paintings of Joseph Lycett. He was an Australian painter producing work during the time that the British government colonized Australia (to use it to banish criminals, among other things), between 1788 and 1850. Taking his landscapes, lush and calming views of the ocean, Ross inserts loud, disruptive colors, graffiti, and symbols of invasion. A couple wearing hi vis yellow vests interrupts a group native residents. Other times, a similar couple vandalizes the natural environment. In many of Ross’ paintings and animations, subjects are destructive.

Lycett was a well-known painter, but ultimately found to be an impostor who forged his work. From a young age, this fact interested Ross, who mentions it in her artist statement. She writes:

As a child I was fascinated by the fact that the important colonial painter Joseph Lycett was a forger. In a sense I am continuing his tradition of taking something and forging something new out of it.

One of the reasons for Lycett’s fame lay in the fact he was one of the first to depicted the Aboriginal population engaged in traditional activities, and much of my work has on some level an element of the continuing dance of the races.

The mentality behind colonialism can manifest itself in many ways and the ongoing creep, nay, invasion of high vis yellow and fluoro orange are a modern-day example. I didn’t vote for these colours, yet they are everywhere!

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Clay Bells Ring

In life, there’s always one goober buck-toothed bell who messes it up for the rest of the dignified, monocle-rocking mustachioed bells. As Will Vinton animates- the solution? Get a slingshot.

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