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Treasure Frey

Born into a long bloodline of creatives, illustrator Treasure Frey’s work of collage/ drawings is certainly something to watch for. Her work reminds me a lot of the awesome animations from Monty Python, except with the intricate combination of beautiful mark-making with varying line weights, loops, and brightly colored shapes, she has made a killer style of her own.

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Mehmet Gozetlik’s Neon Signs Transform Popular Logos Into Chinese Characters

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Artist Mehmet Gozetlik has designed a series of popular trademarks into neon signs. The series called Chinatown takes popular logos and adds a description of the represented product in chinese neon letters. The sign’s unusual characters reminisce experiences tourists have wandering aimlessly throughout the world’s Chinatowns letting themselves get seduced by these exotic bright letters. The irony is that nine out of ten times the logo itself is recognizable on its own and the words are unnecessary.  Is there anyone on the planet who cannot identify Starbucks or Pepsi brands on sight?

Mehmet’s signs are made from handblown painted glass. Each letter and product logo is stenciled out and designed from a printed drawing. The process of blowing glass is long and tedious. The flame has to be exactly the right temperature in order for it to mold into the desired shape. After it hardens the glass is painted. Upon studying the signs and seeing them together you realize people cannot digest more than a few colors at once when making a decision. Each logo Mehmet chose has three colors or less which is not a coincidence. It’s been documented that the brain can only handle six choices at once. If it goes over that number it shuts down. Corporate culture wouldn’t dream of this happening and explains why these logos are kept simple.

A few years ago, Gozetlik designed another interesting series which minimized logo packaging. The study “Minimalist effect in the maximalist market” showed how a product becomes more desirable as the packaging is stripped away. He used brands such as Nutella and Pringles to achieve this goal.   (via designboom)

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Seungae Lee’s Mythical Beasts

The mythical creatures and monsters in Korean artist Seungae Lee’s drawings twist, morph, and transform into one another while simultaneously doing battle for their life.

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Georges Rousse, The Grandfather Of Single-Perspective Installations

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Single-perspective installations have been extremely popular for the past several years, with the best examples making their rounds instantly on the usual social media platforms. The real shame of this mass exposure is that viewers rarely experience the tactile joy of these illusions, viewing the photographs but never seeing them first-hand. This is especially true with the work of Georges Rousse, a French artist who has been creating his painted perspective installations in abandoned and soon-to-be demolished buildings since the 1980’s.

Finding influence from Land Art as well as specific works like Suprametist painter Kazimir Malevich’s Black Square, Rousse pre-dates the modern trends of illusionistic installation, having perfected his trademark geometric style and his fondness for desolate locations decades ago. According to his site’s bio, Rousse considers himself a painter, sculptor, architect, and ultimately a photographer, but considers his raw material to be his great inspiration: Space. Upon selecting a site, Rousse goes about creating a unique angular perspective, that when photographed, compels the viewer to re-analyze their own surroundings, possibilities, transformations, and ultimately, Space.

Rousse explains, “The convergence of these spaces goes beyond a visual game: Like a hall of mirrors, enigmatic and dizzying, it questions the role of photography as a faithful reproduction of reality; it probes the distances between perception and reality, between imaginary and concrete.” (via My Modern Met)

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Sashiko Yuen’s Technicolor Nightmare: A Psychedelic Bubblegum Take On Violent Female Emotions

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Sashiko Yuen

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Sashiko Yuen aka Wishcandy has created what she describes as “a sassy candy coated horror show”. Her series “Rise and Fall of the Sugar Brigade” places the female body at the junction of pulp violence and erotica which transports you through a technicolor nightmare. Her watercolor and graphite dreamscapes place girls of all different body types in candy filled landscapes, often displaying violent emotions accompanied by titles like “ Bring it”,“Tired of your shit” , and “ You don’t own me” brandishing butchers knives or baseball bats with tears running down their cheeks.

Rather than putting the female body on display, her work expresses angst, vengeance and rage through an unexpected use of color, the depiction of food not only as part of the background but also as a prop and the use of sex as a power over one’s womanhood. One of her pieces entitled “Escapism” features a girl with pink hair lounging on a giant pizza slice with an adamant look on her face. It is thought provoking in the sense that bright colors and girls are not often used associated with deeper, darker topics and emotions.

Upon first glance, Wishcandy’s work looks colorful and cute, but it runs much deeper. It is full of intricate details, colors, and shapes that create an edgy and unique depiction of female emotion. She confronts the viewer with blood, violence, and frustration while using the brightest colors reminiscent of early 1950s and does not shy away from the grotesque. You can really feel the female energy coursing through her work in a way that makes it seem like it should be cover art for an all girl rock band.

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Powerfully Disturbing And Certainly Controversial Art By The Kid

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Powerfully disturbing, and certainly controversial, the art that 22-year old artist The Kid creates spans genres. He describes his work as “forever caught between innocence and corruption,” and the well-executed pieces are compelling with their huge, detailed, Bic pen-drawn faces and hyper-realistic sculpted bodies. Photos of his sculptures, made from materials such as platinum silicon, glass fiber, oil paint, human hair, cotton, and mixed fabrics, force you to look, and look again, in order to believe that they are, in fact, inanimate objects.

In his latest work, The Kid is influenced by bullying inflicted on him by fellow students and teachers when he was younger. The sculpture “Do you believe in God?” which depicts the artist kneeling and holding a gun in his own mouth, was in response to the Columbine killers, who he feels he understands and sees as “victims of a social context.”

“All subjects of my drawings for the exhibition “endgame” really exist and are currently being held in prison-even in the United States-with exactly these tattoos. They are not imaginary and no detail is invented. They are all serving life sentences without the possibility of parole, until they die in prison. There is no other hope for them-a life in adult prison at the beginning of their sentence, that’s all, even though they have been convicted of violent crimes they committed before the age of 18.” (Source)

It’s clear that The Kid empathizes with these stigmatized subjects and hopes to give them back some humanity by evoking compassion from the viewer. Many share his view that social determinism condemns people from birth because of their familial circumstances, but by depicting, in such a graphic way, a sampling of those who are affected, he brings attention to the issue. It’s not empty sentiment, either. The Kid donated a portion of the profits from this work to the non-profit organization Human Rights Watch, which defends the rights of people worldwide. (Via yatzer)

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Beth Campbell’s Artwork Is Toying With Your Perception

Blue Lamps, 2010

Blue Lamps, 2010

Stereo Table, 2012

Stereo Table, 2012

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

My parent’s bathroom at the house I first lived in had a full-length mirror behind the sink, which also had a mirror.  As soon as I was tall enough to see over the counter, I remember staring at an infinite number of my own reflections bouncing back and forth and I recall the frustration that I could never find where the reflections ended.  This is the memory invoked when I saw Beth Campbell’s work for the first time.

Working in a variety of mediums: drawings, sculpture and what she calls “architectural interventions,” Campbell’s body of work toys with perception.  Her Potential Future Based on Present Circumstances drawing series maps possible outcomes to present decisions.  These were the first works I saw by Campbell and I recall thinking how brilliant, but impossible they were.  Like me and my reflection in the mirror, Campbell was trying to make sense of the unrealistic and perhaps impractical idea that we can know what might have been.  Their humor and neurosis seemed so quintessentially human to me that I became an instant lover of her work.

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Tim Lahan’s Still Life With Sex Tape

A friend just came back from Brooklyn with New York based artist/designer Tim Lahan‘s art zine Still Life With Sex Tape, and man is it a joy to look at. His drawings are simple, graphic, and funny. It mostly consists of taking ultra banal, overlooked objects and moments, reducing them to a few distinctive lines, warping them a little, and in doing so makes them silly, interesting, and just plain cool. If you like what you see, you can order his zine from Smalltime Books. They’re only ten bucks, made on recycled paper, and free shipping to boot– there’s no reason not to have this in your life! More of his zine along with some of his still life drawings after the jump.

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