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Brett Gundlock Documents The Underground World Of Canadian Neo-Nazi Skinheads

Brett Gundlock - Digital Photograph

Brett Gundlock - Digital Photograph

Brett Gundlock - Digital Photograph

Photojournalist Brett Gundlock delves deep into the everyday lives of Canadian Neo-Nazis in his emotionally conflicting series The Movement. The imagery presented is shockingly conflicting as we are shown moments of intimacy between the group’s members, and are also haunted by the many symbols embodying Nazi racism and violence. Isolating themselves from conventional society, the Neo-Nazi’s underground world is shown through photographs full of bloody walls, Canadian Red Ensign flags, and Swastikas.

Gundlock provides private, personal situations of a dark and troubling minority in a somewhat unlikely place; Canada. Interested in marginalized groups of society, Gundlock explains that his relationship with this series is complicated due to the obviously upsetting Neo-Nazi ideology focusing on White Supremacy. Gundlock describes his experience with this underground culture:

“The symbol of white skin is penetrated and marked with the black inks of Nazi symbols. Crime becomes the bullet point to their alternative résumés. Their existence requires a distinction between themselves and mainstream Canadians, people they understand and reinscribe as “the enemy.” A self-fashioned minority who believes they should be the majority, the Neo-Nazi enclave animates the tensions of a culturally diverse Canada.”

Gundlock’s sociological approach to his documentary style photography creates an informative and engaging dialogue in The Movement. Gundlock asks a very important question in his statement on this series, why do some Canadians become Neo-Nazi Skinheads? Perhaps it is the human need for community and belonging that drives some people to join such a hate-filled group. Often, people join these groups for a sense of entitlement, importance, or a sense of belonging. Gundlock’s photographs point a keen eye on a controversial part of society that many do not wish to face.

You can view Brett Gundlock’s newest series by checking out his Instagram.

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Fred Eerdekens’ Shadow Typography Art

Fred Eerdekens’ work combines shadows and and typography to create experimental artworks that lie somewhere between installation and sculpture. Each piece relies on the perfectly lit gallery space to create the visual tricks and the process of the work is revealed as viewers walk around and interact with the work. Not restricted by one material Eerdekens uses everything from artificial cloud formations (pictured above) that spell out “neo deo” to food boxes (after the jump) that are arranged to cast the shadow “Come Home”.

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Street Artist FAREWELL’s Destroys Outdoor Advertisements With Homemade Paper Shredder

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Street art is well known for its finite lifespan and dependence on documentation for audiences outside of the immediate vicinity of the public work to experience it. French street artist FAREWELL typically creates accompanying videos along with his interventions, expertly documenting the entirety of his project from conception to execution. And Strip Box might be his best yet.

As seen in this poetic yet instructional video, FAREWELL creates a rather simple device (which the artist calls the “destructeur”) with wood, hardware and X-Acto blades. Executed in Paris, the destructeur is placed inside of a bus stop’s rotating advertisement, creating a self-shredding device when the ads rotate. Strip Box is not only ingeniously simple, but also strongly imagines a world where advertisements disrupt themselves. (via vandalog)

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Valerie Blass Reimagines The Human Figure By Abstracting Its Structure and Space

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Artist Valerie Blass reimagines an age-old subject in art, the figure, and uses her distinctive artistic vision to create her intriguing sculptures. She manipulates and abstracts the human form until some of her subjects look like entirely different beings. By constructing her artwork from an eclectic variety of different materials, each figure becomes highly stylized and unique. Ceramic, Styrofoam, paint, plaster, and even artificial hair are just some of the materials that can be found making up Blass’s artwork. Referencing material culture, one can see the many textures and elements transforming each figure.

Valerie Blass’s figures hold in intense, psychological quality due to their lack of identities. Although there are many fine details in her work, Blass often leaves out the figures’ face. Sometimes, even part of the body is gone. These aspects are replaced by surreal characteristics such as a heap of black hair or a colorful, organic mass. Each piece of Valerie Blass’s takes on a life of their own, with their own, unique textures and colors forming a new kind of creature. Her work is both bizarre and beautiful all at the same time, leaving you puzzled about what exactly it was that you saw. This Canadian artist has an impressive body of work, with her art being owned in both public and private collections around the world.

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Neil Krug’s Vintage Sex

I just recently discovered Neil Krug‘s website but I’ve been seeing his work all over the place for years. Neil’s photos and videos combine a perfect mix of vintage, psychedelic, and sex.  If I ever start a band this guys getting a phone call.

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Sean Anderson

 

Sean Anderson is a painter based out of Santa Barbara, CA. The jungle is a reoccurring theme in his work, and connects to his past experience of being an artist in residence in Bolivia for two years. He plays with novel color relationships and combines non-traditional media, such as spray paint and florescent enamel alongside oil on canvas. Bold and vivid, with their dilapidated houses fixed in florescent hues, the paintings often appear lit as if by nuclear blast.

His jungle paintings sometimes demonstrate an interest in commercial art and advertising, taking direct influence from pop artist Ed Ruscha by combining landscape and text to bring new meaning to ordinary or nonsensical phrases.

In addition to his work as a painter, Sean is co-curator of the Anderson Art Collective and works alongside his brothers (also artists), Benjamin and Ron Anderson. He has an upcoming show at Firehouse30 gallery in Walla Walla, WA. 

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Victorine Müller Performing Inside Her Sculptures

At times called ‘performative sculpture’ Swiss artist Victorine Müller combines sculpture and performance art to intriguing effect.  Her large but airy PVC sculptures stand ghost-like, glowing in the light and disappearing in the shadows.  Müller herself sits or stands peacefully inside the sculpture.  The title of her most recent exhibit “Wild at Heart” sheds some light onto her work.  Müller temporarily inhabits the inside of an animal – the guts, the heart, the womb, the soul.  Though simple, each performance connects easily with the viewers communicating, as Müller says “something that is not said and cannot be said, but that is.”

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Art Basel Miami: Day 1

Any attempts to describe the madness that was Art Basel Miami 2010 in a few sentences will undoubtedly fall short. Put succinctly – lots of art, lots of people, lots of sun, lots of fun. People go to Art Basel Miami for many different reasons, but yours truly went in search of the ever-exciting, awe-inspiring, never-before-seen, knock-your-socks-off, kick-ass kind of art that makes me say YES! Did I find what I was looking for? It’s hard to say my friends, so loyal B/D reader you be the judge. Here are some of the highlights from Day 1: Art Basel Miami Beach…

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