Get Social:

Nathalie Croquet Spoofs High Fashion Ads Using Models That Encompass A Diverse Range Of Age And Body Types

Nathalie Croquet - Photography and StylingNathalie Croquet - Photography and Styling advertising spoofNathalie Croquet - Photography and Styling

Nathalie Croquet is a French stylist and journalist who has cleverly recreated high fashion and beauty advertisements in an Instagram series entitled “Spoof”. Having once worked as Biba’s fashion editor and Jean Paul Gaultier’s photo director, Croquet is deeply familiar with the types of imagery that have defined such marketing campaigns, from Eric Bompard’s pink-toned whimsy to Isabel Marant’s sultry and pseudo-dishevelled aesthetic. The lighting, makeup, and styling are remarkably similar between the originals and their spoofs (the studded plaid shirt in the Eleven Paris parody appears near-identical, for example), with the critical differences lying in the models themselves: they encompass a diversity of body types and ages.

Playful and light-hearted, Croquet’s imagery reminds us of the theatricality of fashion advertising; lighting, makeup, and costumes are carefully arranged to appeal to marketed notions of high-end beauty. The “Spoof” models do a great job recreating the postures and facial expressions to reveal both the parody and the construction of the original campaign imagery. Visit Croquet’s Instagram and website to learn more. (Via AnOther)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Fabio Tonetto

Fabio Tonetto has some pretty crazy illustrations where his cute characters look like they are made out muscle tissue or twisted veins. You can check out his flickr page as well.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Michaël Aerts Paints It Black

I love Michaël Aerts black and white sculptures. If black metal bands made art it would look something like this.

Currently Trending

Unbelievable Photographs Of Strangers Who Look Like Twins

BrunellePhotog2 BrunellePhotog BrunellePhotog13

Photographer Francois Brunelle has been studying the human face since he first started photographing them in 1968. His recent project began when he snapped a photo of two North American acquaintances who looked remarkably similar. Brunelle is now set on photographing 200 unrelated couples who look like they could be separated at birth. In the beginning of this project, he took photographs of people he happened to know who looked similar, but since his project has gained media attention, some people have come forward as look-alikes. As of January of this year, Brunelle was still inviting couples to take part and help him reach his goal of 200 photographs.

“It is not about looking like famous people,’ he said. ‘The project is about looking like other people.”

“The fact that two persons, totally unrelated to each other, sometimes born in different countries, share the same physical appearance is really the essence of (it).” (via)

Currently Trending

Wallpaper Company Feathr Breaks The Mold And Collaborates With Artists To Create Bold Designs

Feathr-Wallpaper-1-Peter-Judson_M

Feathr-Wallpaper-2-Dave-Towers_M

Feathr-Wallpaper-4-Otto-Press_M

Feathr-Wallpaper-5-Robin-van-Wijk_M

Now you can decorate your home/office/studio with wallpaper that strays from the norm. A company called Feathr has started collaborating with artists to make statement with bold wallpaper design that will inspire your daily routine. Definitely staying within the parameters of textile design the company now represents a large group who think outside the box. Some of the collaborators include Peter Judson who takes art deco in his brightly colored patterns to arrive at a striking motif and Russell Marshall who pulls directly from Warhol and uses a gun and the check bought with it for pop effect. Using both abstract and figurative patterns the placement and use of color pushes these new designs just a tad off the grid thus allowing for more free-flowing ideas. By joining up with different artists the company allows for more conversations to occur between design and fine art which references Andy Warhol’s pop and consumer ideal. This middle ground allows more people to see the work of these artists and also show how their ideas can be used in a more commercial sense.

The papers are all reasonably priced and can be bought on the Feathr website. They are currently becoming a cool commodity in the design field. (via designmilk)

Currently Trending

Jan Esmann’s Hyper-Realistic Paintings Of Sleeping People For The Voyeur In All Of Us

1536

At first glance, the oil paintings of Jan Esmann could easily be confused with photographs; seen in heightened resolution and depth of field, the portraits capture the remarkable tangibility of the human face. Also unlike your typical photographic subject, all of the painter’s characters are sleeping, caught wide-mouthed in their own personal dreamscapes, allowing viewers an uncomfortable and enchanting intimacy with the private imaginings of the unconscious mind.

Seen from above and as if lit by candlelight, Esmann’s strange and transfixing portraits evoke narratives like that of the mythological Psyche, who, against her lover Cupid’s warnings and prohibitions, snuck a candle into their bedchamber so that she might glimpse his face. The painted faces seem to stand at the precipice of wakefulness, their folded, glistening eyelids precariously shut. The viewer is allowed to witness the most vulnerable of states, yet (s)he does not escape the unnerving sense that s(he) might be caught, found out.

The consistent open mouths betray sleepy yearnings, unabashed moments of ecstasy in slumber. As if possessed by spiritual or erotic climax, Esmann’s subjects are sensuous and blissful; saliva glitters on canines, and sweat sets the face aglow. Unconfined to a more truthful representation of human perception (either photographic or otherwise), the artist’s hyper-realist style enables her to picture every inch of flesh with the same breathtaking clarity. Viewers may examine every feature, while the objects of our attentions remain frozen in time and space. In this beautifully bizarre series, we are permitted our voyeuristic impulses. (via Lost at E Minor)

Currently Trending

Doug Aitken’s Mysterious Sonic Fountain Created In The Middle Of 303 Gallery

doug aitken

doug aitken

doug aitken

Central to Doug Aitken’s “100 YRS” exhibition at 303 Gallery is a new “Sonic Fountain,” in which water drips from 5 rods suspended from the ceiling, falling into a concrete crater dug out of the gallery floor. The flow of water itself is controlled so as to create specific rhythmic patterns that will morph, collapse and overlap in shifting combinations of speed and volume, lending the physical phenomenon the variable symphonic structure of song. The water itself appears milky white, as if imbued and chemically altered by its aural properties, a basic substance turned supernatural. The amplified sound of droplets conjures the arrhythmia of breathing, and along with the pool’s primordial glow, the fountain creates its own sonic system of tracking time.

Behind a cavernous opening carved into the gallery’s west wall is “Sunset (black),” a sculptural work that resembles cast lava rock in texture and spells out the word SUNSET as it glows from behind, its letters forming a relic of the entropy and displacement inherent in the literal idea of a sunset. Viewed from and obscured behind a hole in the wall, the sculpture appears as cosmic debris, as if pulled from a parallel world where a sunset is only an idea, obfuscated by detritus of the age of post-everything, a reductionist standpoint between the modes of pop and minimalism, its glow fading into the next realm. Also on view is the mirrored sculpture “MORE (shattered pour)”. Like a time-piece, the work creates a kaleidoscope of reflections of all that surrounds it. As if it were a fragmented film, “MORE (shattered pour)” creates a literal manifestation of the present and aspirational escapism, which cannot be viewed without glimpsing a piece of one’s self within the work’s reflections. Another refraction of time is glimpsed through “Fountain (Earth Fountain)”, created from plexiglas letters spelling the word “ART”, through which a slurry of moist dirt is pumped, physical earth perpetually redoubling and standing in for itself. The word ART itself subverts the entropy of time, creating a holding pattern that organic matter cannot escape from. The flickering lightbox “not enough time in the day” completes the communicative supercurrent of shimmering malaise, its letters overlapping as if seen inebriated, somehow both more profound and less understandable. The work creates a cycle that is both hypnotic and inescapable. (via)

Watch a video of the show after the jump!

Currently Trending

Tom Howes Minutiae Interventions And Observations

Kalamazoo, Michigan based artist Tom Howes’ drawings, collages, and sculptures subverts both the seriousness and banality of  memories, ideologies, observations, and the minutiae of everyday life. Whether it’s with minimal engagement or a more expressive approach, he attempts to level the playing field between expectation and reality by directing attention to the obvious. In doing so, we learn that the obvious often remains subjective.

Currently Trending