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Marion Bolognesi’s Drippy Watercolor Portraits

Marion Bolognesi makes emotive watercolor portraiture that seems to appear out of the nothingness of their stark, white backgrounds. She often uses drips and large blots to echo the transient feelings that make us human. This technique also adds a nice aesthetic to the artist’s work, which has spawned a few biters and copy artists. Bolognesi demonstrates a lot of economy- the artist’s ability to do a lot with a little is commendable. With such fundamental subject matter, it’s probably best to keep things simple anyway. It’s not always easy to capture the deeper elements of life with grace, but she pulls it off. The artist, who also does illustration and design work, lives in NYC.

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Skote @ Night Gallery

Skote disrupts your normal routine. Founded in 2006 by artists Jill Pangallo and Alex P White, Skote is a performance collaboration dedicated to the value of artistic play and group dynamics. Skote utilizes the unpredictability of public interventions and the accompanying documentation to evoke an alternate universe that blurs the boundaries between visual art and theater, audience and performer, fiction and fact. “Produce. Consume. Discard. Are you buying?”

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Baer Ridgway Exhibitions: A Thin Slice

 

Barry McGee, Side By Side

 

With an unparalleled legacy of alumni and faculty members, the San Francisco Art Institute has been a long-term leader in fine arts education since 1871. Baer Ridgway Exhibitions is hosting an exhibition which features artwork by faculty and alumni. A Thin Slice, running from May 16th to June 20th, provides a small, but dynamic survey of artworks that display a breadth of engaged investigations.

 

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MoMA Launches New Björk Video And An Expansive Retrospective Of Her Musical Career Thus Far

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In a daring undertaking, MoMA’s curator Klaus Biesenbach has pulled together an immersive exhibition concentrating on the last twenty years of Björk’s musical career, her eight full length albums and also features the launch of her new video Black Lake. Taken from her new album Vulnicura (2015), and filmed in Iceland in the summer of 2014, the 11 minute long video uncharacteristically explores the personal life of Björk and her break up with long time romantic partner Matthew Barney. The video was commissioned by the gallery and gave Björk another chance to work creatively with director Andrew Thomas Huang, whom she teamed up with on her previous video Mutual Core. For Black Lake, she also worked with the talented Erna Ómarsdóttir – a choreographer who gave life to Björk’s emotional journey through the break up. The video moves through the different stages of separation, including grieving, processing, and reincarnation.

The exhibition also features a retrospective of her music videos, from Debut (1993) to Biophilia (2011) across from the screening of Black Lake. In the lobby of the gallery, there is a showcase of the instruments used on Biophilia: a gameleste, a pipe organ, gravity harp and a Tesla coil. And to compete the experience,

…Songlines presents an interactive, location-based audio experience through Björk’s albums, with a biographical narrative that is both personal and poetic, written by the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón, along with many visuals, objects, and costumes, including the robots designed by Chris Cunningham for the “All Is Full of Love” music video, Marjan Pejoski’s Swan Dress (2001), and Iris van Herpen’s Biophilia tour dress (2013), among many others. (Source)

( Via Boooooooom)

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Grycja Erde

goat contraptionI am truly a sucker for anything of an absurd nature.  I also love the classic style of old propaganda posters.  So when I stumbled upon the collages of Miss Grycja Erde, twas a happy moment.  The nature of Grycja’s collages made me assume she was an older artist, since they have a mature approach to absurbity (in my opinion).  But I was surprised to find out she’s just 23!  Enjoy these tasty treats coming to you from Ukraine.

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Architectural Photography That Looks Like Futuristic Viruses

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Munich, Germany based Cory Stevens shoots architectural photography in a peculiar way.  He abstracts the architecture by photographing a segment of a building and reflecting it in various ways.  In some photos the reflection is duplicated, and in others its repeated many times as if in a kaleidoscope.  All of the reflections merge seamlessly, though, as if it were one floating structure.  The strange symmetry gives the buildings an almost organic quality as if it were about to divide and multiply on its own.  In a way, they resemble viruses made of steel, cement, and glass.

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Design Watch: Bernhard Burkard

Bernhard Bukard’s Curt Deck Chair is probably the coolest outdoor furniture we’ve seen in a while. On his site Bernard assures us that, “even though it looks dangerous it provides comfort seating and relaxing in every occasion. To achieve best stability, it needs to be leaned against walls or rails in a flat angle. The anti-slip coated stand provides safe grip on every surface.”

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Aaron Draper Poignant Yet Hopeful Photographs Of The Homeless

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The Underexposed series illuminates outsiders of the world, homeless people of our streets. Aaron Draper has made the deliberate decision to literally put in the spotlight a dozen of men and women living on the streets, giving an authentic representation of what could happen to any of us. Not wanting to fall into the cliche of taking black and white photographs or insisting on the harsh features of his subjects, Aaron Draper is applying a commercial tone to the way he envisions their lives, giving the viewers a more positive imagery of scenes not so pleasant to usually watch.

That’s the reason the series has gone viral, the viewer is not in a position of guilt, he doesn’t need to feel bad. He is invited to share that special connection the photographer encountered when meeting his subjects. Inspired by John Steinbeck’s vision on dispossessed families struggling to carve their way into life, he spent a lot of time and money getting to know the personalities behind the facade of their humble lives. Using a camera strobe and a documentary effect, Aaron Draper wants to turn around the false perception one might have about homeless life. He says if he can only initiate that shift, his work will be successful in his heart.

The video below details the photography process of the Underexposed series and shows a passionate Aaron Draper at work. (via Trenf)

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