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Lina Hsaio’s Bizarre Moss And Lichen Covered Floral Portraits

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Sculptures made out of moss and lichen. The organic foam that grows on rocks and trees and that are usually considered repellant. Lina Hsaio uses these unwanted and rejected elements to create fantasy faces. Whether painted or textured, the portraits depicted by the artist seem to always be comprised of flora.

The face shapes are perfectly balanced. The major features appear distinctly; nose, mouth and cheeks. It almost seems like the plants grew directly onto the human faces. The fuzzy components were perhaps not chosen coincidently by Lina Hsaio. Moss and lichen are different in their form of life. One is a plant, breathing and living; the other is a composite organism but not a plant. Intertwined together, they symbolize life and death.

The purpose of Lina Hsaio is to question the human condition. According to her work,  it’s all being summarized in the green, bushy portraits. Behind each individuals is hidden a force stronger than themselves.“Lina’s series of mixed media portraits displaying erratic forms of the human condition with elements that are not to be confined to universals symbols”

Lina Hsaio’s work will be displayed at the Image Gallery in NYC until November 6th 2015. (Via The Creators Project).

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Christopher Jonassen’s Planet-Like Pots

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Christopher Jonassen photography9

Photographer Chistopher Jonassen‘s series Devour seems cosmic in origin.  They appear to be photographs of planets mottled by millions of years of meteorite impacts and scarred by geological forces.  In reality the series depicts the bottoms of pots.  The worn metal is burnt, scratched, and often just old.  Devour illustrates the destruction, even violence, inherent in eating and nourishment.  On his website Jonassen precedes the series with a quote from philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre: “To eat is to appropriate by destruction.”

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Jasper James

London photographer Jasper James has visited some international meccas: New York, London and Beijing, trying “to get as high up in the city as possible to give [him] an overview and a sense of scale to the size of the city,” and to to combine the micro with the macro- the individual and the cityscape into one shot. Even though I’m in China right now, I’ve yet to see the beautiful same view as he’s managed to capture in these shots.

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Documentary Watch: The Knife Maker

 

Meet writer turned knife maker Joel Bukiewicz of Cut Brooklyn. He talks about the human element of craft, and the potential for a skill to mature into an art. And in sharing his story, he alights on the real meaning of handmade—a movement whose riches are measured in people, not cash. Watch the full documentary by Made By Hand after the jump.

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Famed Director Stanley Kubrick’s Phenomenal Early Photography Portfolio

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stanley kubrick

stanley kubrick

Like many directors, Stanley Kubrick (known for such iconic films as The Shining, Clockwork Orange, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Full Metal Jacket) began his love of film for the medium’s capacity to immediately capture scenes developing around him. The award-winning director’s photographs show early promise, mastering stylistic elements such as composition, lighting, balance and subject, which might not be surprising. However, the young Kubrick’s subject matter, mostly street-scenes with everyday New York and Greenwich Village people, life and struggles, might surprise some coming from the famed science fiction director. The photos, which have a nostalgic tone not necessarily associated with the forward-thinking director, certainly bring a romantic mood to the seemingly simpler time.

Many of these photos were taken during the 1940’s, while Kubrick was employed as a photographer for Look Magazine (a gig he landed while still a student at City College New York). It was while working for Look that Kubrick began associating with the film programs at the Museum of Modern Art, a connection which eventually launched Kubrick into a career in his life-long interest of film. (via everyday-i-show)

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Cigdem Keresteci

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Artist Cigdem Keresteci is an illustrator and motion designer working out of Istanbul. Her inspired doodles have an ease about them that lends a youthfulness and brightness to her work. Along with animator Quba Michalski, Keresteci runs imago new media, a motion graphics studio. The pair do it all, from developing the initial concept, to script writing, illustration, photography, film, animation, and editing.

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Ruben Brulat’s Wild And Naked Photographic Encounters

Ruben Brulat

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More than a year ago, photographer Ruben Brulat set out on a journey from Europe to Asia by land only, through Iraq, Iran, onto Afghanistan, Tibet until Indonesia, Japan and Mongolia. The map below outlines the route that Brulat carved out for himself, marked with places where he briefly parallelled the paths of other travelers. His new series, “Paths,” is a collection of portraits the artist took of the strangers he met along the way. Brulat makes a concerted effort to capture each subject completely exposed in the natural setting where they crossed paths, prompting them to surrender themselves completely to the landscape.

According to the artist, he envisions the series as “a narrative constructed only by the randomness of the encounter, places and body—meeting with utopia and hope in these only suspended moments. [These are] bodies of people that became friends, performing, not without difficulties, leaving wounds, marks, and souvenirs from a time before heading towards different paths, after sharing one for a while.”

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Kris Kuksi’s Insanely Detailed Gothic Sculpture

Kris Kuksi - Sculpture

Kris Kuksi - Sculpture

Kris Kuksi - Sculpture

Kris Kuksi - Sculpture

We’ve covered Kris Kuksi’s Churchtanks series in the past, which invoked religion alongside symbols of modern warfare to create a curious blend of spirituality and the profane. “Ascension of Eos” is a more recent work, taking the exploration of larger than life mythos intersecting with the mortal coil.

Eos, the goddess of dawn in Greek mythology, or perhaps a statue of Eos rises up from a sea of humans. She’s being worshipped or built — or perhaps the two are one in the same. The humans around her are in a frenzy — some are tangled together in frantic sex, others are being crushed by wheels and impaled by arrows. Her congregation’s agony can just as easily be interpreted as divine ecstasy, and painted with a dark patine, the entire tableau seems truly gothic.

“I get inspired by the industrial world, all the rigidity of machinery, the network of pipes, wires, refineries, etc.,” says Kuksi. “Then I join that with an opposite of flowing graceful, harmonious, and pleasing design of the baroque and rococo.”

Beautiful, dark, and mysterious, Kuksi’s work contains tons of detail. It’s created through mixed media assemblage, which adds texture and physicality to the piece. At more than four and a half feet tall and three and a half feet wide, it looks almost like an altar or a memorial. (h/t Dark Silence in Suburbia)

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