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Powerfully Political Art Made From Food

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three sculpture1

The artwork created by the Japanese art collective known as Three creates work with a political subtext as powerful as it is subtle.  Three often uses common food objects such as fish shaped soy sauce packets or candy.  For example, the installation Eat Me uses 7,000 wrapped candy pieces hung from the gallery ceiling in the shape of a house.  Visitors are encouraged to pluck candy from the installation and toss the wrapper in a corner set aside in the gallery.  Slowly throughout the day the ‘house’ of candy is transformed into a pile of trash – a symbolic recreation of the overwhelming destruction of homes by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

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Stunning Photographs Prove That Bees Are Beautiful

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In the past years, bee populations have been devastated by something scientists are calling Colony Collapse Disorder, causing a global crisis for humans and other animals. Sam Dreoge, a biologist at U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, catalogs hundreds of bee species in his lab. As the head of the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab, Dreoge produces stunning high-resolution images that capture the diversity and spellbinding beauty the fascinating and helpful little creatures.

Dreoge’s photographs, which are used to identify and track bee populations, are often magnified up to five times the actual size of the insect. Focusing on minuscule details normally only visible under a microscope, most of the pieces are composites of numerous images, shot at multiple ranges with a 60 millimeter macro lens. Each image is also carefully edited, scrubbed of specks of dust. In preparation for the photo shoots, each bee specimen undergoes a bath in warm water and dish soap, after which they are carefully blow-dried to showcase their astoundingly beautiful, vibrant hair.

Dreoge’s images of bees read like the technological age’s answer to Leonardo da Vinci, who studied and sometimes killed insect specimens for the dual purpose of art and science. Research like this always raises ethical flags, but that moral question becomes more complicated when we are confronted with environmental crises like CCD. Bee populations are effected by parasites as well as problems caused by humans, like pesticides and climate change; it’s imperative that we find a way to save these miraculous animals, and Dreoge’s work could go a long way. What do you think? (via Smithsonian and Colossal)

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Chris Dent

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Chris Dents‘ illustrations on architecture explore the modern metropolis. His unique pen style shows the energy of the city through intricate and detailed drawings.

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Andreas Kocks

Andreas Kocks’ work might look like boiling tar splattered on gallery walls but it is in fact meticulously cut paper covered with layers of graphite.

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Anamorphic Illusions Of Painted Spaces Create Living Picture Frames

Anamorphic Illusions

Anamorphic Illusions photography

Anamorphic Illusions photographs

 

In their series, “Anamorphoses,” French artists Ella and Pitr (Papiers Peintres) transform forgotten, run-down places into colorfully framed spaces that create anamorphic illusions. The duo paints frames onto stairwells, empty rooms, and hallways, giving the normally 2D experience of a frame the depth of 3D. The photographs have to be taken at a particular angle in order to create the desired shot of a figure inside the painted canvas. The outcome is a whimsical portrait that lends playful depth to an otherwise drab and neglected setting. The artists completed these installations and photographs as part of a project for National Dramatic Center of St Etienne. (via my modern met)

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Olga Ziemska’s Natural Wonderlands

 

 

Olga Ziemska’s artistic statement appears as a poem on her website. And one of her lines, “The body is nothing without that which surrounds it” is especially important when it comes to art. The Ohio based sculptor has been refocusing her energy into fully serving it too – seeing as how most of her work in the last couple years has involved outdoor installations, which can incorporate a lot more people encompassing them than the few invited into collector’s homes. However, what I like most about her recent work, other than its ability to be shared, is that it’s made up of mainly organic materials sourced from nature. (via)

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Bea Fremderman: Reality Bytes

 

At this point there’s no use denying the ridiculous amount of time most of us spend on a computer each day, and artist Bea Fremderman is among a growing number of contemporary artists that use this reliance as a tool in their practice.  Much of (arguably all of) the imagery we see on a computer is an illusion.  A digital fabrication or manipulation meant to simulate or document reality.  But as our physical and digital worlds continue to fold in on one another – who decides what is real?  We must become our own authorities on reality, and Fremderman seems keenly aware of this.

Fremderman may be young, but the elegance with which she blurs lines is anything but amateur.  A range of objects and textures shift contexts as they face-off with their own physical and virtual counterparts.  The end result of which is an aesthetically and conceptually dynamic body of work.  Her practice is multifaceted, but focused.  Fremderman chooses her media/mediums based on what will most effectively convey the ideas in her work, and I am eager to see what she comes up with next.

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John Kissick’s Visual Explosions

John Kissick’s paintings are a colorful explosion of abstract patterns, forms, thick paint, and gooey textures. Kind of like a  Piñata filled with paint.

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