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Photographs Of Trees In Front Of Canvas Backdrops Turn Nature Into Art

Myoung Ho Lee - Photography

Myoung Ho Lee - Photography
Myoung Ho Lee - Photography

Myoung Ho Lee, with the aid of assistants, cranes, and ropes, places blank white canvases behind trees in various natural settings throughout South Korea– in order to bring a part of the background into the foreground. According to The New York Times, the artist only digitally retouches “the trace of his own hand” because “If the mechanics of the artwork were visible, it would be easier for people to recognize the scale and the method . . . I want to hide them, to infuse a magical and vague aspect to my work, so that viewers may question and try to find answers themselves.”

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Sonia Rentsch’s Still Life Portraits Of Organic Weaponry

Sonia Rentsch - organic objects Sonia Rentsch - organic objects Sonia Rentsch - organic objects Sonia Rentsch - organic objects

Sonia Rentsch is an art director and still life artist from Melbourne. From intricately arranged appetizers to a hanging lamp fashioned out of a head of lettuce, Rentsch’s work is both dynamic and elegant, often incorporating food as a subject. This trend is put to most effective use in her series Harm Less, an installation in which Rentsch fashioned weaponry out of completely organic objects. Each piece is visually arresting, the imagery of handguns and bullets hauntingly familiar and yet transformed into something beautiful when created out of green produce and plants. The series, in which handguns are made out of everything from bamboo shoots to roses, presents a powerful statement about gun violence and its impact as well as Rentsch’s impeccable eye for detail.

Rentsch has worked with photographer Scott Newett, assisted with design duo Tin and Ed, and worked as the production designer for Australian popstar Kimbra’s music video for “Good Intent”. Her work is consistently bright and colorful, but always proffers a lens through which viewers can fully immerse themselves in the elaborate scenery. One of her most recent projects, a public installation with artist Ben Davis, included a garden of colored pinwheels displayed in Melbourne’s La Trobe Place. Although the meticulous design behind Rentsch’s still life images is evident in each minute detail, Rentsch is assured in working with no set process. As she said in an interview, “An idea comes as quickly as it has to.”

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Chinese Artist Vacuums Beijing’s Polluted Air for 100 Days And Creates A Brick Out Of His Findings

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Climate control has been a controversial and momentous topic, well, for at at least two decades, but, the issue of global warming seems to be re-trending in light of the the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. One tactic of addressing the issue’s importance, as we have seen, has been the thousands of activists marching all over the world (and the silent protest in Paris due to recent events). However, a Chinese performance artist who goes by the name “Nut Brother” has decided to take a more quantitative and perhaps informative approach. Beijing, the capital of China (the country that has largest CO2 emissions in the world), is a city of industrial smog. The artist announced a plan to literally vacuum the dust from the Beijing’s air for four hours a day, for 100 days in a row. As a performance, the artist walked the streets, starting in late July, with a pony tail, often a respirator mask, and vacuum with suction nozzle held in his hand to collect debris. On November 30th, the last day of his project, he gathered all 100 days worth of dust and brought it to a brick factory to be mixed with clay and turned into an alarming soot filled brick. Nut Brother is aware that he is not actually changing the air quality, however, he hopes his project will provoke passerby’s to consider their relationship to the environment and their surroundings. (via QUARTZ)

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Amy Boone-McCreesh’s Celebratory Displays

Amy Boone-McCreesh’s sculptures take inspiration from celebratory and funerary displays  found in various cultures. They also remind me of birds nests if they were dipped in fluorescent paint. Her drawings are great as well.

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Time Lapse Of Fog Flowing Into San Francisco Two Years In The Making

Simon Christen video2 Simon Christen video1

Adrift from Simon Christen on Vimeo.

Photographer Simon Christen calls Adrift, his two year in the making video, “a love letter to the fog of the San Francisco Bay Area.”  The often daily fog is just one feature that makes the San Francisco peculiarly wonderful.  Christen worked through out the two year period to catch the images fog a few seconds at a time.  An ocean of fog appears to flow like water down hills, through and under the Golden Gate Bridge, and into the city.  Set to a custom score by Jimmy LaValle of The Album Leaf, Adrift underscores the beautiful mystery of unique area.

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Anja Markiewicz’s Teeny Tiny Origami

Anja Markiewicz’s microscopic origami must be made with a magnifying glass, small tweezers, and a million years worth of patience.

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Sarah Sze Forages And Deposits A New Installation At Venice Biennale

Sarah Sze - Installation Sarah Sze - Installation Sarah Sze - Installation

Sarah Sze’s installations incorporate everyday items from toothpicks to light bulbs, and “Triple Point,” her most recent endeavor at the Venice Biennale, is no different. Ladders, paper scraps, aluminum rods, sleeping bags, and other finely scavenged items collect and assemble to create a whole new type of machinery: a thinking one that has to do with re-assessing value and investigating the romanticism of objects at play with one another in this never-ending Milky Way of constructs.

According to The New York Times, Sze “wanted the installation to bleed out into the environment.’’ This is relevant to not only the pavilion itself, where the bulk of her work sprawls from room to room and outward onto the exterior landscaping, but also the neighboring community.

Blazing a cryptic trail, before the opening, Sze deposited a series of fake rocks (aluminum structures wrapped in photographs of rocks) sporadically in unexpected places, sometimes, with local businesses, who now house them in unconventional spaces, often along with their own imaginative origin stories. The intention is to lead patrons into the exhibit slowly, almost subconsciously, as though foraging their own trail into the surprising wilderness of Sze’s art.

More images of the installation and a video after the jump.

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Tom Howes Minutiae Interventions And Observations

Kalamazoo, Michigan based artist Tom Howes’ drawings, collages, and sculptures subverts both the seriousness and banality of  memories, ideologies, observations, and the minutiae of everyday life. Whether it’s with minimal engagement or a more expressive approach, he attempts to level the playing field between expectation and reality by directing attention to the obvious. In doing so, we learn that the obvious often remains subjective.

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