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Street Artist FAREWELL’s Destroys Outdoor Advertisements With Homemade Paper Shredder

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Street art is well known for its finite lifespan and dependence on documentation for audiences outside of the immediate vicinity of the public work to experience it. French street artist FAREWELL typically creates accompanying videos along with his interventions, expertly documenting the entirety of his project from conception to execution. And Strip Box might be his best yet.

As seen in this poetic yet instructional video, FAREWELL creates a rather simple device (which the artist calls the “destructeur”) with wood, hardware and X-Acto blades. Executed in Paris, the destructeur is placed inside of a bus stop’s rotating advertisement, creating a self-shredding device when the ads rotate. Strip Box is not only ingeniously simple, but also strongly imagines a world where advertisements disrupt themselves. (via vandalog)

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Sneak Peak: Jeremy Mora @ Zuam Projects

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Most people know Jeremy Mora via his gallery space POV Evolving but Jeremy is also an amazing sculptor. He recently headed to Lisboa, Portugal for a “larger than life” show at Zaum Projects featuring hundreds of sculptures.

Jeremy primarily works in sculpture creating miniature worlds out of everyday debris. Each piece is like a small planet, inhabiting tiny people going about their everyday life in a world built out of styrofoam, paint, and wood.

Congrats on a great show Jeremy! Wish I could have seen it in person.

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Cath Riley’s Photorealistic Drawings Explore The Intimacy Of Flesh And Touch

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Cath Riley is an artist who creates stunning, photorealistic drawings that explore the power of touch and the sensuality of flesh. In each image from this series, bodies are pinched, gripped, and squeezed, with Riley’s masterful shading depicting the smooth skin as it creases and dimples. And even though we are only given a small portion of the body — such as a hand clenching a waist, or pressing between the thighs — the drawings emanate warmth, intimacy, and humanity. In a synesthesia of visual perceptions and tactile sensations, Riley’s works celebrate the materiality and strengths of the body, exploring the pleasure and personal connections that derive from the loving, physical interplay of firmness and softness.

All of Riley works — which can be viewed on her website — portray an incredible attention to detail and awareness of the human form. In her Hands series, for example, she captures complex musculature and tiny creases with sublime accuracy and beauty. It is no wonder that her work has been recognized; her recent clients include Nike, GQ, and The New York Times, and she has won several awards, listed here. In regards to upcoming work, Riley writes that her “current on-going experimental ‘drawing’ includes very large scale drawing, based around the human figure, which are very different in character from the pencil portrait and ‘flesh’ figure drawings which are featured here. Some of the new work is abstract in nature.” She adds that “examples of this ‘new direction’ […] will appear on the site quite soon,” so be sure to follow her work (Source). More images from the Flesh series after the jump. (Via Juxtapoz)

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James Reka

Just because everyone and their mother is doing graffiti and “street art” these days -rendering the talent pool watered down and chunky like a hasty batch of kool-aid, doesn’t mean the form has reached its peak and the guys who actually know what they’re doing should hang up the gloves. James Reka, of Melbourne, Australia, knows what he’s doing. Reka just killed a solo show at Backwoods Gallery in Melbourne, and released “Pissing in the Wind”, a book of risograph prints documenting the life and times of the Aussie artist. Hope to see him in the ‘States soon.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: True Colors

Four months of exhausting hard work in an abandoned area with no sun just artificial light. The final result, a stop motion movie with no digital effects where everything is handmade. everything is handmade. Over 5000 pictures were processed with an average of 15 per second to make this come alive! By Quintessenz Creation.

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Rejected Movie Posters For “The Shining” Designed By The Legendary Saul Bass

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Saul Bass (1920-1996) was a legendary American graphic designer and filmmaker. In 1980, twenty years after collaborating with Stanley Kubrick on storyboards for Spartacus, the two artists came together again to produce posters for The Shining. However, many drafts were needed before the recognizable, yellow one-sheet depicting a crazed, stippled face emerged into existence. Here, you will see four designs from Design Buddy and TOH, all of which Kubrick rejected, his reasons for each scrawled (somewhat harshly) in the margins. Bass’ cover letter and Kubrick’s response are also included.

Among the rejected designs are images of the maze and the hotel, which Kubrick deemed respectively as “too abstract” and “looks peculiar.” Bass also tried more interpretive approaches, such as a toppled tricycle lying eerily inside a hand, or the family of three crumbling into terrifying abstraction. Kubrick’s response was likewise as blunt: “too irrelevant,” “looks like science fiction film.” While Bass’ designs are skillfully done and represent genuine efforts to capture the essence of the groundbreaking psychological horror, most of us would probably agree that the final product — the face disintegrating into madness — suits the film best. (Via The Film Stage).

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Marcus Kenney

Paintings and sculptures by artist Marcus Kenney, utilizing a wide variety of materials and subject matter.

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Spooky (But Quirky) Graphite Sketches From Renee French

 

Renee French has been making comics for a long time. But for a few years now, she’s maintained a sketchblog full of spontaneous, faded graphite drawings that draw their appeal from creative character design and dubious narrative elements. Think of the black and white surrealist aesthetics of a Travis Louie painting, scaled and repackaged for children’s book production.

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