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Michelle Hinebrook

Michelle Hinebrook’s paintings bring together op-art, hard edge painting, geometric patterns, and psychedelic imagery to create  explosive and densely layered abstractions.

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Osmosis TV & Beautiful/Decay Present Robbie Conal!


Artist Profile: Robbie Conal from By Osmosis TV on Vimeo.

Beautiful/Decay teamed up with By Osmosis TV to create a unique video artist profile on Robbie Conal. Conal’s searing political caricatures fuse iconography and symbols from pop culture, current media and his own imagination. We are frequent collaborators with Robbie- most recently he contributed a beautiful skeleton-dance glitter painting to our current retrospective show, “Beautiful/Decay: A to Z.” You can see Robbie working on the piece in his studio in the video– as well as discussing his artwork and philosophy! We’re thrilled to be working with By Osmosis on a number of upcoming projects, including another artist profile, as well as a piece on the history of Beautiful/Decay magazine. If you’re unfamiliar with By Osmosis, they are a boutique production company, specializing in profiling innovative creatives.

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Daniel Mackie

Daniel Mackie’s watercolor  illustrations take the human figure, give it a few tattoos and twist, pull, bend, and turn the limbs in every which way.

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Danny Treacy

Danny Treacy

Made from found objects and discarded clothing, Danny Treacy creates these haunting stiff figures that seemingly link Frankenstein and trash. In the “Them” series, this London based artist successfully creates a sculpture that is full of contradictions, Treacy describes these creatures as “soiled and stained and perfectly formed,victors and the victims, true and false.”

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Kristina Knipe’s Heartrending Portraits Of A Painful Struggle With Self-Harm

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In her recent series I Don’t Know The Names of Flowers, photographer Kristina Knipe examines her struggle with self-harm by documenting the marks and personal effects associated with the trials of others similarly suffering. Through the vulnerability of her subjects– some of whom she knew and others whom she found over Craigslist– the artist reveals a richly specific portrait of her own injury.

Inspired in part by the work of Alessandra Sanguinetti, Knipe situates her subjects within a decidedly natural world. Against a backdrop of wildflowers and floral patterned sofas, her portraits courageously reveal a tension between the beatific organic landscape and the angled, mechanical patterns of scarred and restitched flesh. The title of the work amplifies this sense of alienation, laying bare the tragically unfulfilled desire to connect with the simple purity of a budding rose.

Gently evoking poignant feelings of nostalgia and loss, this notion of innocence and corruptibility is explored further by Knipe’s expertly uncomfortable use of childlike imagery. In Andrew’s Dress, she presents a tiny article of clothing that for a grown man serves an unknowable purpose; as it wavers in the wind, viewers are forced to confront permanent blood stains. Similarly, a Raggedy Ann doll splays herself almost obscenely in a bed, revealing the words I Love You carved into her chest in red. For a particularly devastating image, Knipe shoots a page in a journal, revealing the terrifyingly pained visage of a girl scribbled in crude and childish lines.

Amidst this haunting sense of innocence lost, Knipe’s sprinkles her photographs generously with a dangerous sense of addictive ecstasy. Her photographs are decadent, richly colored and tonally mesmerizing. Scarred flesh is gleaming and sensual, and a beer can explodes orgiastically over a blissful subject. With relentless passion, Knipe invites viewers into a private world, colored by highs and lows that are equally difficult to navigate. (via Feature Shoot and Tischtography)

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Ellen Jewett Sculpts Flowing Creatures Woven With Tiny Plants, Animals, And Objects

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Ellen Jewett is a Canadian artist who creates flowing sculptural fusions of plants, animals and objects. Among her mystical menagerie is a wild boar with shrubs growing from its mane, foxes with tails sprouting into grass, and a deer whose body resembles a tree-shrouded grove. As singular beasts, Jewett’s creatures are beautiful and dynamic, but look closer and you will see that each one is composed of tinier parts, microcosms of flora, fauna, and objects that weave seamlessly together. These layered components infuse each sculpture with multiple narratives, from celebrations of life and growth, to stories of death, decay, and burden in the form of manmade debris. As Jewett explains:

At first glance my work explores the more modern prosaic concept of nature: a source of serene nostalgia balanced with the more visceral experience of ‘wildness’ as remarkably alien and indifferent. Upon closer inspection of each ‘creature’ the viewer may discover a frieze on which themes as familiar as domestication and as abrasive as domination fall into sharp relief.  (Source)

Jewett makes the sculptures from the inside out, layering materials and utilizing negative space to create hollowed works that flow into the air around them: dense frames unravel into breezy foliage and empty space, creating habitats for fluttering, sculpted birds. The results of these disentangled bodies are creatures that speak their strengths via expressions of lightness, vulnerability, and emotion. Jewett describes this effect:

Over time I find my sculptures are evolving to be of greater emotional presence by using less physical substance: I subtract more and more to increase the negative space. The element of weight, which has always seemed so fundamentally tied to the medium of sculpture, is stripped away and the laws of gravity are no longer in full effect. In reading the stories contained in each piece we are forced to acknowledge their emotional gravity cloaked as it is in the light, the feminine, the fragile, and the unknowable.  (Source)

As part of her creative and flowing artistic practice, Jewett strives to free her work from materials with toxic properties, such as glazes, paints, and finishes. This greatly limits what she can use, but at the same time, incites her imagination and makes her work even more unique. “Where possible I source the natural, the local, the low impact and, always, the authentic,” she writes (Source). Check out Jewett’s website for more beautiful and holistic creations. (Via Lost at E Minor)

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Design Month: Skull Chairs

Who knew skull chairs were a thing? Here is a small collection of our favorite chairs that resemble the most iconic part of the human anatomy. Pictured above is the Skull Chair from the Vanitas collection by Vladi Rapaport.

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Ziemowit Maj

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Ziemowit  Maj is a London base designer, who does simple, yet powerful and impactful illustrations.

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