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Emmanuelle Brisson’s Meditative Photoseries of a Woman Surrounded By Butterflies

 

French photographer Emmanuelle Brisson created this photo series, L’air frissonne des choses qui s’enfuient, which depicts a woman clad in thin white linen interacting with butterflies (moths?). The pictures are so quiet. They seem to exist independently from any worldly concerns. Looking at them, everything goes away. Each image is it’s own boundless meditation, and the loose context involved allows you to create your own significance for each one. See more from the series after the jump. (via)

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Evan Baden Takes Us Behind The Scenes Of The World Of Sexting

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Chicago-based photographer Evan Baden has captures the world of adolescent sexting in his series cleverly titled Technically Intimate. The word “sexting” was officially added to the dictionary in 2012—that is how common this word and action is. Selfies and nudes being sent back and forth to people via smart phones has become commonplace. The fact of the matter is, these explicit photos never truly disappear. Evan Baden shines light on the privacy issues at hand concerning digitally sent photos, especially ones that are meant to be intimate or private. Interestingly enough, the title of this series, Technically Intimate, refers to a level of intimacy that is perhaps supposed to be felt between the people doing the sharing of sexual photos. Although the intention of these photos may have started out as intimate between two lovers, they remain forever in the public sphere. Therefore, no intimacy can be achieved.

Evan Baden starts each photograph with an image from real life, found online. He then hires a model to pose in a similar way, in a similarly adolescent environment. The final result is a re-imagined version of the original photos that has been shared online, accessible for anyone to see. In this uncomfortably close series, we are a fly on the wall, looking into a both private and public situation. For more amazing photography with an eye on pop-culture and its digitalization, Evan Baden is in an exhibition that will be on view September 19th until January 17th at the NRW-Forum Düsseldorf Contemporary Culture Center titled Ego Update: The Future of the Digital Identity.

Baden delves deeper into his intriguing series explaining this incredibly relevant topic. (via FeatureShoot)

“The poses in my images emphasize the repetitiveness of the sexual images that pervade our society while the rooms that the scenes are staged in and the ages of the room’s occupant clash with those highly sexualized poses, causing an unease in the viewing of those pictured and reminding the viewer that with every leap we take in technology and convenience there is an equally deep crevasse into which we can fall.”

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Kira Ayn Varszegi Uses Her Breasts As Paintbrushes

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The painter Kira Ayn Varszegi substitutes her own 38DD breasts for traditional brushes, covering them in paint and pressing them to her canvas. For Varszegi, fun is an essential element in art making; she hopes to inspire amusement and smiles. Though her work has of course been criticized and cast aside as “frivolous,” the artist has made a name for herself, boasting at least one painting purchased in each American state.

Before we give in the the impulse to judge, let us take a minute to appreciate the product of Varszegi’s efforts. Her paintings quite resemble the work of abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollack or Mark Rothko; she, like them, hopes to inspire more primal and visceral emotions with her marbled surface of color, texture, and form.

But unlike most (but not all) of the 1950s trailblazers, Varszegi is a woman, and that fact is essential to her art making process. Where many modern art movements have been dominated by an idealized machismo, the boob artist embraces what some might call the feminine or the sentimental. Here, the breasts, symbols both of female sexuality and fertility, are the means of creation, as opposed to the paintbrush, an instrument whose form is vaguely evocative of the phallus.

The artist’s compositions mirror the “feminine” tenor of her process, their soft, glittery tones forming elusive and symbolic butterfly and floral shapes. Paint drippings and splotches swirl together in an evocative, orgiastic blur. Take a look, and let us know what you think of the project. It is groundbreaking or silly? (via Oddity Central)

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Book 4 Sneak Peak: Behind-the-scenes at the B/D Headquarters!

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We sent off Book 4 to the printers the other day, so we thought we’d give you a sneak peak of what we have in store for you. The above is a screen cap from an amazing collaboration between 26 artists from around the world. I don’t want to give away all the details for this project, but think of it as a Y2K version of one of the most classic art-based games. Confused? Good! Read on to see more behind-the-scenes tidbits….

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Paper Chasin’

brian dettmer Oh, the journeys you can go in books!  Brian Dettmer shows no respect for Webster as he cuts this dictionary… into something far more awesome. But wait there’s more!  Someone better yell timber, because here’s a forest’s worth of paper art from many great artists.

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Constance Mallinson’s Nature People

Constance Mallinson‘s large-scale paintings merge the man-made world and nature literally by constructing figures from images of leaves, twigs, and decaying organic material. They are grotesque meditations on both the mortality of humans and the world in which they live. Her full-figured “nature people” reference both the works of Giuseppe Arcimboldo, the 16th-century Italian known for paintings in which still life objects are used to form surreal portraits, and famous paintings, such as Edouard Manet’s 1863 seminal painting “Olympia.”

In examining her recent paintings created from decaying matter, L.A. Times critic Christopher Knight wrote that “after painting savvy landscapes for more than twenty five years”… the current “imagery suggests the way in which we project ourselves on conceptions of nature, creating the natural world even as we go about assuring its destruction.”

See Constance’s work from now until July 28th at Culver Center of The Arts in Riverside, CA.

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Elle Perez

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“My name is Elle Perez and I’m a photographer from the Bronx, I’ve been working on a documentary for the past like…. four years (consciously anyway, i photographed it before but didn’t know what i was doing) about the afam/latino punk scene in the Bronx that no one really knows exists…I really have a hard time editing this ’cause I’ve been working on it so long. i have like 5,000 images on film and over 30,000 digital files ’cause I’ve been photographing it since I was 12 (I’m 20 now).”

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Lorenzo Vitturi’s Hand-Made visions of the world

Italian photogprapher Lorenzo Vitturi describes his work as “hand-made visions” where each body of work consists of a completely constructed new world where each visual element is hand crafted  with the utmost attention to detail. For his latest project Anthropocene Vitturi created a strange industrial world filled with debris, strange colored horses, and surreal body builders. Vitturi say’s about this project:

“This project is the result of a reflection about the relationship between man and nature, as it proposes – in line with 16th Century naturalistic painting – a symbolic system able to visualize the intersection between this two dimensions.
Up to the early 20th Century nature had been represented as an unspoiled, pure space animated by uncontrollable forces;
today, after just one Century, nature has proved to be a fragile system whose survival is highly dependent on an increasingly pervasive and destructive anthropization.
In such a context, where all equilibria and “rules of the game” are being overthrown, how can we still depict nature and men? Nature is loosing its natural features, while men are increasingly taking control over the whole cycle of life.
Starting from this paradox, my project consists in a series of images where site-specific installations built within a derelict location play a central role. In this visions the “mis en scene” becomes a tool for representing a nature which appears less authentic and indeed more and more a cultural product.
Each image is the result of a meticulous process of scene design and construction. The materials used were scattered construction and industrial remains, natural pigments and fake plants.”

See more images from Anthropocene and some very nice behind the scenes photos of the construction of the shoot after the jump!

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