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William Farges’ Rorschach-Like Inverted Nude Bodies

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French photographer William Farges‘ series “White Line” features surreal reflections of body angles, parts, and positions. Farges creates new shapes and figures by placing the reflections of nude bodies side by side, representing a continuity of form that is both startling and elegant. The series is, of course, named for the white line that dissects his diptychs – an element that emphasizes the new forms’ symmetry as a product of an inversion.  These forms reach and pull into each other, appearing as if each could disappear into the other. Farges’ images are Rorschach-like deconstructions that are smooth and round and contained. “White Line” is the result of another series of Farges that similarly deconstructs and reimagines the human form, “Chimera.” (via feature shoot)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Robot Makes Paintings

 

I always thought that robots would one day make all the art in the world but I never imagined that the day would be so near. Benjamin Grosser’s Interactive Robotic Painting Machine uses artificial intelligence to paint its own body of work and to make its own decisions. While doing so, it listens to its environment and considers what it hears as input into the painting process. In the absence of someone or something else making sound in its presence, the machine, like many artists, listens to itself. Watch a video of the robot in action after the jump!

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KWON KYUNGYUP’s Wounded And Bandaged Beauties

Kwon Kyungyup’s figurative paintings reveal an unassailable world of sensuality, duality and emotional imprisonment. She approaches her figurative paintings in a way in which her subjects are depicted almost as inhuman and immaculate beings, as if the body is merely a storage for deep memories of pain, loss, and trauma. Her paintings represent wounded souls sheltering within bandaged boys and girls. The bandage-covered faces are symbolic of a wound the body remembers: a spiritual, ontological wound that purifies or sublimates emotion. In Kwon’s work tears are positive equipment for delivering emotions. The eyes of the figures are focused on the object that brought the sense of loss. Pearls similarly stand in as tears and as a metaphor for the meaning of emotional purification, curing, and sublimation. These works are exquisite and intimate portraits of human frailty and resilience.

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Ian Pfaff


Ian Pfaff’s demo reel is a classic. In my mind, the guy nailed it. While partying really, really, hard while on spring break, Ian multitasks by writing, editing, directing, animating, building props, and making music. All around killer.

VIA ChangeTheThought

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The Unexpected Art And Beauty Of Extracting Marble From Mountains

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In Il Capo (The Chief), Italian filmmaker Yuri Ancarani exquisitely documents the unexpectedly captivating and largely unexplored process of marble extraction.

Set in an Alpine quarry, Il Capo presents the powerful dynamic between the boss and his workers, focusing predominantly on the wordlessness of their dialogue. Using seemingly enigmatic gestures and hand signals reminiscent of a conductor directing his orchestra, the boss silently and gracefully guides two lumbering bulldozers as they claw into the hillside and extract colossal wedges of marble. Juxtaposing the boss’ fluid movement with that of the bumbling machinery, Ancarani successfully conveys the astounding and paradoxical nature of the process: “how he can move gigantic marble blocks, but his own movements are light.”

In addition to the visual strategies employed in Il Capo, Ancarani has a unique approach to sound. Void of conversation, narration, and soundtrack, the short film offers only the sounds of the heavy machinery and the toppling marble—placing all emphasis on the rawness of the process, and conveying, above all else, the artistic nature intrinsic to a seemingly industrial task. (Via Nowness)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: A Bridge Too Far

A few months back one of the busiest freeways in Los Angeles was closed down so that a bridge could be taken down. The entire city was in a panic dubbing the weekend of closed freeway access Carmageddon. Luckily the traffic wasn’t too bad but I always wished I could see the process of taking down such a large bridge in just a few days. Filmmaker James Miller recently heard about a similar situation in the UK and jumped on the chance to videotape the process. Shot in gorgeous time lapse you can now witness what it’s like to take down a major bridge in just 24 hours. Watch James’ video after the jump.

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WALEE takes Photoshop to a whole new level

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My favorite one of WALEE’s insane digital portfolio. The slices in the skin are amazing. And also its depiction of obsessed Facebook (literally) users like me. The image after the jump is really awesome too. Makes me actually feel the liquid…

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Fun With Oliver Dunn

I am really enjoying UK artist Oliver Dunn’s work!

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