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Zero Cents’ paintings of Bloodbaths

Tel Aviv artist Zero Cents updated his blog recently. Cents is great because his style fits his subject matter so well. I feel dirty just looking at these, and I mean that in the best way possible. See more of the artist’s gory new stuff after the jump. 

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Manon Wethly’s Flying Beverages

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Photographer and designer Manon Wethly has been experimenting with a series of photographs that is almost certainly as fun to shoot as it is to look at.  Wethly flings beverages of all sorts into the air and photographs the flying liquid.  The floating globs of wine, juice, coffee, and milk which are in midair for a moment are instead frozen for a single image.  These flying spills resemble abstract glass sculptures.  They’re color against the blue sky and swirling shapes make these “accidents” artful.  [via]

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Akira Nagasawa

Primal paintings of primal beasts by Akira Nagasawa.

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Andreas Lie’s Double Exposures Fuse Animals With Idyllic Landscapes

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Norwegian artist Andreas Lie fuses wild creatures with landscapes in a subtle collection of animal portraiture. Using two different photographic images, he creates a double exposure where woods, water, mountains, and even the Northern Lights are contained within the bodies of beasts. Polar bears, foxes, and wolves are all featured, and their torsos become one with the ground.

The textures of trees (like evergreens) often works in Lie’s favor. It mimics the look of fur so while these images are undoubtedly surreal, they also look natural. And, that’s part of their appeal. They combine visually disparate elements of the natural world in a way that’s aesthetically pleasing. It comes in a nice, animal-shaped package.

Lie sells his work via Society6. Check it out for prints, clocks, tote bags, and more. (Via Blu)

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Read This: Rita Ackermann

A native of Hungary, Rita Ackermann moved to New York City in the mid-1990s, arriving to find a culture— and art world—in transition. Rave and zine culture was in full swing; collaborations between artists, musicians, and magazine and book publishers were pervasive; and the age of the Internet was upon us. Within a few short months, Ackermann received widespread attention for her work, particularly a group of canvases populated with figures inspired by the cult German film We Children from Bahnhof Zoo about the heroin subculture of the 1970s. Her work forged a new visual language: paintings, drawings, and collages which telescoped between a virtuoso—and sometimes brutalistic—expressionism and taut, precise figurative drawing. Ackermann’s work explores the paradoxical relationship between fragility and violence, as she derives inspiration from literature, film, philosophy, and popular culture.

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Dear Van Gogh

mike mak Dear Van Gogh 1Whether you’ve already had your morning coffee or not, here’s a mug full of satire from Mike Mak.  The ear is made of silicone, so you can stretch and play with it. Yummy! If you ever wanted to channel the spirit of good old Vincent, now there is officially a way you can do that.

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Daniel Agdad Imagines And Creates Ultra-Detailed Industrial Machines Out Of Cardboard

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Extremely detailed machines made out of cardboard. Australian artist Daniel Agdag creates directly with his hands and scalpel. The industrial machineries he imagines and makes are a mean to raise consciousness on how human beings are powerless and ignorant over the machines they use daily.

In the ‘Principles of Aerodynamics’ series, Daniel Agdag demonstrates his ability to produce an intricate sculpture using just his imagination and memories he collects from details on architectural elements like buildings or monuments. He doesn’t sketch anything before diving for hours into his work. His process is described as ‘Sketching with Cardboard’. He conceives a hot air balloon, reel-to-reel recorder and a radar-dish without planning. The purpose remains the same : to entice the viewer’s curiosity and to generate a reaction.

The artist’s subject matter places individuals in a position of uncertainty. The machines that we use daily are complex and we tend to forget it. Furthermore, we might forget in the process that we are being helped by those machines, and that without them we could no longer pursue our effortless life. Daniel Agdad’s examination of the effect machines have on us is reminiscent of artist Jean Tinguely’s purpose. By building creative machines from garbage and found objects he ‘aimed to satirize the fallibility and unpredictability of machines and our reliance on them’. Daniel Adgad, by manipulating a simple material like a cardboard attempts to freeze time and the world we are living in. And reconnect the viewer with what he is actually capable of achieving thanks to the use of complicated machines.

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The Street Art (Literally On-the-Street Art) Of Roadsworth

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The subtly subversive work of artist Roadsworth fits well in the long history of street art.  However, rather than finding his art on the wall, you’ll need to look down.  Roadsworth, as his name suggests, sticks to asphalt.  Making slight additions with paint to the language of road symbols, Roadsworth provides drivers and pedestrians alike with brain-interruptions for the morning commute.  Roadsworth explains:

“The ubiquitousness of the asphalt road and the utilitarian sterility of the “language” of road markings provided fertile ground for a form of subversion that I found irresistible. I was provoked by a desire to jolt the driver from his impassive and linear gaze and give the more slow-moving pedestrian pause for reflection. The humourlessness of the language of the road not to mention what I consider an absurd reverence for the road and “car culture” in general made for an easy form of satire.” [via]

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