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55% Off All B/D Back Issues- One Week Left!

books_on_sale-565x745In honor of Spring, Beautiful/Decay is offering back issues at over 55% off the cover price! We have slashed ‘em down to the lucky price of just $3. Who wants to scrub floors or clear out a dusty garage for “Spring Cleaning” anyways? We suggest you buy some of your favorite B/D back issues, curl up on a porch swing, and savor the feeling of getting a great deal instead. Buy B/D Back Issues here!

This sale ends April 1st and 3 back issues have already sold out so get your copies now!

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Christian Northeast

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It was hard to just pick a few of Christian Northeast’s works to post. This talented illustrator and animator work reminds me of a more contemporary Terry Gilliam mixed with Margaret Kilgallen’s folk art. He has worked with many publications like the New Yorker and Esquire to name a few. His work has much more than aesthetic appeal to it, its clever and you get a good sense of Northeast’s sense of humor.

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Daniele Papuli Swirling Bent Paper Installations

Daniele Papuli’s incredible installations and sculptures at first glance seem like a pool of foaming and rippling water but upon closer examination reveal that they are simply bent and cut sheets of delicate paper. Thousands of sheets of paper bend, fold, and move together in unison creating a dialogue between the spaces and places that they are exhibited in. (via my modern met)

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Florentijn Hofman’s Iconic Massive Sculptures

Internationally renowned artist Florentijn Hofman does not settle for less. His sculptures are large, very large, and are bound to make an impression. Take Rubber Duck (2007) for example: a gigantic 26-metre-high yellow rubber duck. It is an inflatable, based on the standard model that children from all four corners of the world are familiar with. The impressive rubber duck travels the world and pops up in many different cities: from Auckland and São Paulo to Osaka. A very positive artistic statement that immediately connects people to their childhood. Hofman’s sculptures often originate from everyday objects. A straightforward paper boat, a pictogram of an industrial zone or mass-produced little toy figures can all serve as sources. They are all ready-mades, selected by Hofman for the beauty of their forms. Subsequently he crafts these into clear and iconic images; cartoonish blow-ups of reality that alienate and unsettle through their sheer size and use of materials. Nevertheless they are immediately identifiable and have an instant appeal. (via faith is torment)

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Brian Guidry

 

I stumbled across the work of Brian Guidry not so long ago. It was a quite pleasant experience as I am a fan of gorgeous geometric abstractions, shapely surfaces, elegant finishes, and lovely colors. See more after the jump.

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Ian Pfaff


Ian Pfaff’s demo reel is a classic. In my mind, the guy nailed it. While partying really, really, hard while on spring break, Ian multitasks by writing, editing, directing, animating, building props, and making music. All around killer.

VIA ChangeTheThought

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Felipe Caprestano

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Designer Felipe Caprestano has recently launched himself into a project he titles “Face Couture”,  an experimental project in which he designs, patterns, and sews clothing… for your face! His blog chronicles his creative process, successes, and failures, and there you can watch his ideas grow form concepts into fully functional masks, (if masks can really be said to be functional). Check out this video that summarizes Caprestano’s works!

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Paintings Depict Environmental Low And High Brow Decadence

Jean Lowe - Painting

Jean Lowe - PaintingJean Lowe - Painting How does our plastic/synthetic “throw away” culture affect not only our values, but also our environment? Walmart retail may seem cost effective and conservative, but in a glutton abundance, it’s possibly just as decadent as the upper echelons of collecting from the Renaissance or Baroque times. By placing disposal items such as Coors beer, shelves or detergent, and bargain bin t-shirts under a canopy of classically rich “painted” ceilings in her work, Jean Lowe cleverly examines these ironies and more.

Regarding this fiscal clashing, David Pagel suggests, “This compromise between high art and low culture suggests that splitting the difference between extremes creates a mutation both queasy and questionable.”

This is what makes each piece striking– Lowe is not just easily questioning consumerism’s role in art, but instead asking us to consider where art lives and who it lives for. It’s not just about “what” but “how” such blending or bleeding confuses, masks, or tempers our own sense of place and thought.

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