Get Social:

Fumie Sasabuchi

FumieSasabuchi_a1

Japanese artist Fumie Sasabuchi reworks the pages of fashion magazines by deconstructing the original image and the body in the image. She uses the image and idea of death to explore a surface, creating a series of hybrid body images in which promotional aesthetic is fused with material naturalistic anatomical study.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Dive Into the Underwater World of Adam Wallacavage’s Magnificent Octopus Chandeliers

Adam Wallacavage - epoxy clay, lamp parts, epoxy resin and spray paint

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

What do you get when you combine underwater sea creatures with elegant and sophisticated lighting? You get the weird and whimsical octopus chandeliers of artist Adam Wallacavage. The Philadelphia based artist uses traditional ornamental plastering techniques to create working chandeliers in the shape of octopus and fantastical sea life. Each chandelier is created from a wide range of materials such as epoxy resin, iridescent powders, spray paint, and glitter. His inspiration and ideas come from a very eclectic range of sources such as flashy church decoration, tales of underwater adventure, and, not surprisingly, taxidermy. His absurd style is both gaudy and Victorian while still being absurdly fun.

Wallacavage’s childlike imagination turns a seemingly normal object into wonderfully gaudy and kitschy chandeliers full of shiny colors and tentacles. Each chandelier Wallacavage constructs is unique with their wide array of pastel, glittery colors and their endless ocean-life motifs. These include green seashells, purple tentacles, pink pearls, and even big, round eyes starring straight at you. Some of his chandeliers seem to be inspired by the pastel colors and ornate design of the Rococo period, while his other chandeliers have a louder palette with strange faces and eyes. His octopus creations create a surrealistic atmosphere as each sea monster is suspended from the ceiling, reaching out its tentacles, which happen to hold the chandelier lighting. After seeing Wallacavage’s highly imaginative and extravagant chandeliers, you realize how much chandeliers already looked like octopus! Not only can you find the artist’s octopus chandeliers in several New York City galleries, Wallacavage is also an accomplished photographer. He even has a book published on his photography titled Monster Sized Monsters available in many museum stores.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Our Romance With Discarded Beds And Found Photographs

Louise O'Rourke - Photography Louise O'Rourke - Photography Louise O'Rourke - Photography

Louise O’Rourke’s photographs document not just the idea of rejected beds as a form of waste, but more so, the repetition of intimate objects made sadly public with age, which moves her work into a particularly lonesome study of humanity’s careless romance with things.

From Toy Story to the Velveteen Rabbit, children’s literature seems to capitalize on a similar theme that O’Rourke tugs at here: because our beloved objects don’t age gracefully– or even at all– they get thrown away and easily replaced. We don’t even need to see the newer model to know that it is there. It is always there: lingering. Waiting. The job of an object is to selfishly service us until we are done with it. These are the rules. In this sense, objects can never win. Caught in limbo, O’Rourke’s wayfarer beds transition onto the street, heart exposed, welcoming vagrants or rodents. A sad Dickens’ death. It is not a story of waste, but love. Wherever the new bed is, the old bed is not, and will never be again.

However, there is a sign of hope. O’Rourke also notes the value of reinventing old finds such as discarded photographs, of which she peels at the emulsion, saving the scraps, to create a new context and authorship of the image, one that is more ephemeral or abstract.

She states, “By removing the emulsion, I further remove the photograph from the event and even claim the moments that stand out to me. By physically altering the found image with no negative to reprint from, I create my own narrative from those previously captured stories.”

Perhaps, through art, there is life after love for objects.

Currently Trending

Sweden’s Tree Hotels

Swedish designers and architects have taken the fad of adult tree house building and made it extraordinarily Swedish in the best way possible at the Tree Hotel. Mirror houses, UFOs with star-print sheets, giant bird nests; these exist in real life. What a wonderful world.( via )

Currently Trending

Julius Hofmann’s Brash Paintings

Julius Hofmann lives and works in Germany. His acrylic on canvas paintings have depth and surface details that harken back to early stop motion puppet or clay animation stills. His work operates like a series of vignettes that may or may not be part of a unifying narrative. Themes of desperation, fear, and paranoia emerge from his muted scenes. Like projected nightmares Hofmann’s brash and haunting works thrill and mystify.

Currently Trending

Jeffar Khaldi

Jeffar Khaldi, Frozen

Jeffar Khaldi, Frozen

Painter Jeffar Khaldi stamps his personal perspectives onto reality, expressesing this mix, theatrically, on large canvases. These experiences include being born in Lebanon, receiving his BFA from North Texas and living and working in Dubai. You can see more of Jeffar’s work through the Thierry Goldberg Projects website and the Saatchi Gallery.

Currently Trending

TONK

Collaborative unit created by two photographers in Germany. 

Moment of truth (eminem), part 2

Moment of truth (eminem), part 2

Currently Trending

This Collage Is A Puzzler

Kent Rogowski’s Love = Love series of puzzle collages are created by taking out the flowers and skies  of over 60 store bought puzzles and combining them to form a series of spectacular landscapes. Although puzzle pieces are unique and can only fit into one place within a puzzle they are interchangeable within a brand.

Currently Trending