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Laylah Ali Continues To Comment On Society With Her Stick Figures

laylah ali paintinglaylah ali paintinglaylah ali paintinglaylah ali painting

The stick figures of Laylah Ali are like no other. In her latest show The Acephalous Series which means “headless” she continues on her path of creating a new population of figures with strange expressions and round heads. Her newest resemble vegetables of the cucumber and celery kind. Whereas her former works have studied race relations, torture and hierarchy her newest seem to comment on the state of farming and the food industry. In a number of pieces there seem to be deformities of sorts which could be alerting to chemicals which are rampant in food that isn’t organic. A hybrid baby figure lurking in some might also symbolize sickness affecting unborn and young things. Its sometimes hard to tell with work of this nature what it all means but that’s what makes it both fun and enjoyable. It’s a challenge the artist gives the viewer by making something entirely original.

Ali has been on the international art radar for sometime. She participated in the Venice Bienniale in 2003 and Whitney Biennial in 2004. Her work as a whole is attributed to various types of art stemming from ancient hieroglyphics to comic book serials. She speaks about social issues affecting men, women and minorities using everyday objects such as gym balls, sneakers and sticks.

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Artist Update: Dave Tada captures ‘Art Works Every Time’

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A few weeks ago we featured LA photographer Dave Tada and his collection of analog images. Well, last Saturday night, Dave showed up with his Fuji Intax camera at Beautiful/Decay’s Art Works Every Time opening to capture the happenings! Between the live music, the art-adorned walls, the free ice cream, free t-shirts and plenty of free Colt 45, there was plenty of silliness to be had –  particularly towards the end of the evening. Thanks for the pics Dave.

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Lila Jang’s Warped And Bloated 18th-Century Furniture

Lila Jang - sculpture Lila Jang - sculpture
Lila Jang - sculpture
Lila Jang - sculpture

South Korean artist Lila Jang is a sculptor who creates distorted effigies of traditional 18th-century French furniture. From bloated footstools to levitating wall lamps, Jang’s anthropomorphic furniture subverts upper-class affectations into warped Lewis Carroll-inspired imagery, evoking wonder and bewilderment in equal measure at the surreal shapes her furniture take on. Jang received her BFA in Sculpture from Honik University in her hometown of Seoul before moving to Paris to attend École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts for her MFA, and has since gained international acclaim through group shows and art fairs around the globe. According to Jang, her work is a representation of the current state of humanity, stuck “in the midpoint of that constant struggle between reality and the ideal.”

Jang drew inspiration for the series of fantasy furniture from the limitations she found within her cramped apartment in Paris, where tables and chairs only seemed to fit if they were bent out of shape first. The surreality behind the work is also inspired by Jang’s desire to break away from a quotidian routine, turning familiar, unremarkable furnishings into exceptional works of art. Although the pieces are gestural and whimsical in design, the true achievement of the work lies in its retention of the practical applications of the furniture. Even with the canapé climbing the wall, don’t you still want to curl up in it with a book? It’s all the same with Jang’s less functional pieces, such as the warped dining chairs: one can easily picture her pieces fitting right in at any number of houses built by contemporary architects. Jang’s most recent solo exhibition took place at the Centre Culturel de Coreen in Paris where she now lives, presumably in a larger apartment filled with her collection of fantastically anthropomorphic fittings.

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Jordi Ferreiro’s Workshops For Kids

Jordi Ferreiro

Yayoi Kusama homage

Jordi Ferreiro

Andy Warhol homage

Spanish designer Jordi Ferreiro takes on a role often overlooked in the creative industry when he organizes these art workshop for kids. Though I’m definitely not qualified to make any astute comments on arts education in the American school system, it’d be nice if there was umm… more of it. It’s interesting though, to see the sort of primitive forms and ideas presented in the children’s artworks and think “Wow, the stuff made by (enter currently hip artist’s name who makes drawings that look like kids made them) totally looks like this!”. Maybe the form is completely mastered but not the thoughts behind it because the output of a child’s imagination is fresh. We’re just all jaded and hungry for irony.

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Out Now! Beautiful/Decay The Seven Deadly Sins Book!

Don’t forget to get your copy of the limited edition Beautiful/Decay The Seven Deadly Sins Book!

Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Pride, and Envy have been explored—and challenged—for centuries by artists, scholars, and writers. In this issue of Beautiful/Decay, you’ll find artists who explore these themes through a contemporary lens, either by explicitly calling out those deemed guilty of committing one of the Seven Deadly Sins, or by turning the sweeping notion of sin right on its head.

James Gobel tackles Pride through felt portraits of colorfully clad, sexually charged, plus-size bears, and continuing the exploration of Lust, we have the raw and lascivious Polaroids of Jeremy Kost. View Tom Littleson’s bloody portraiture drawings and their relationship with Wrath. See how cover artists Tim Noble & Sue Webster’s adept use of personified garbage channels Gluttony. Libby Black’s paint-and-paper sculptures replicate Envy-inducing luxury brand goods, while paintings and drawings from Brendan Danielsson address the social and physical epidemic of Sloth. Finally, Greed lies at the center of Ghost of a Dream’s hypnotic sculptural art and immersive installations. We’ve also invited international artists, illustrators, and designers to create original pieces for our Project Pages based on all seven sins.

Other featured artists: Carolyn Janssen, Okay Mountain, Colette Robbins, Cleon Peterson, Micah Ganske, Zoe Charlton, Penelope Gottlieb, Paul Mullins, Keith Puccinelli, Travis Somerville, Kara Maria, Aideen Barry, Travis Collinson, Geoffrey Chasedy, John Knuth.

Each copy of Beautiful/Decay: The Seven Deadly Sins comes blind packed with either a zine by Terence Hannum or Heather Benjamin or a limited edition silk screen print by Paul Nudd!

GET YOUR COPY HERE!

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Alex Varanese- Bent Curcuit Type

Alex Varanese illustration

Typographer and illustrator Alex Varanese combines 3d techniques with traditional print design techniques in circuit bent type series of illustrations. I like the consistent and specific use of red in all of Alex’s work. Im not sure what you would call the shade but it’s an iconic palate that’s modern and vintage at the same time.  Alex also has a nice array of custom type on his site. More images after the jump.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: The Drug – Röyksopp

 Röyksopp the drug

A trippy, pyschedelic, drug induced ride through a “Tron” like world courtesy of Röyksopp‘s new music video, The Drug. Watch the full video after the jump and step into the mulit-colored world of hallucination!

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Rebecca Glover’s Sinister Installations

British artist Rebecca Glover works in several mediums, but it’s her installations that are especially striking.  The three installations pictured here – Space Invader, Flat 51, and The Inhabitant – invades the insides of an apartment and galleries.  The calming, almost mesmerizing, color of the spikes clash against the installation’s overall sinister nature.  She describes the installation in interview:

“I had an idea to create a sculpture that broke through the space and played with this idea that there’s something latent in the walls; playing around with what lies beyond what you can see.” [via]

The second series of photos are taken from the Market Estate Project in which seventy-five artists worked with residents to install art in a soon to be demolished housing estate in London.  The work and apartment buildings were destroyed the very next day following the art’s installation.

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