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Takada’s Delicate World of Paper Sculptures

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TakadaPaperSculpture

Yuko Takada Keller creates detailed and intricate sculptures out of paper. Since 1996, she has been using small triangular pieces to create her designs, which she says “symbolizes something like a molecule.” Her work is inspired by dreams she’s had, and her delicate, cascading designs resonate with ethereality. She claims her work has also evolved over time since she’s realized the connection between the thin delicacy of the paper and skin membranes. From her website,

“Tracing paper has a transparency and an untransparency.
I’m interested in how tracing paper is like a skin membrane.
The skin membrane lies between dream and reality.
The skin membrane lies between consciousness and behavior.
The skin membrane is there when life is born.
The skin membrane is part of a human being.
I want to represent the space that people are aware of
The skin membrane is unconsciousness.”

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Slovakian Artist Duo Burn Spooky Pagan And Ritualistic Motifs Into Hardwood

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Jarmila Mitríková and Dávid Demjanovič are a fascinating artistic duo adding spice back into a traditional form of art-making. They hail from Slovakia and employ a technique called pyrography, which involves burning into plywood and shading the images with wood stains. This particular way of mark making was popular with people mostly during socialism in former Czechoslovakia. A style with is linked with folk art, domestic crafts and cultural traditions, the pair tap into their own history and national identity.

In their hybrid style you can see christian traditions, folklorism, pagan rituals, superstitions, myths, local legends with links to WWII and socialistic history, all with the backround of real slovak scenery. (Source)

Mitríková and Demjanovič play to their strengths of storytelling and creating very strong, personal images. We see very graphic scenes being played out – hunting rituals, exorcisms of some type, sacrificial set ups, and masked people involved in cult-like activities. With titles like Guardians of National Spirituality, Procession With Nazi, Cult of Goddess Morena, Dance Plague and Evacuation of Slovakian Elites, they focus on a time of secret societies and unknown mysterious behavior; they speak of a time when not everything was understandable, or explainable.

Typical for their practise is working with mystification and creating thematic series, where they focus their attention on one subject from our present or history….. when they work with real slovak subjects, using their style of storytelling, they create absurd, comic situations and new contextual reading. (Source)

This talented couple manage to recreate a sense of wonder, secrecy, ambiguity and riddles. They put a contemporary spin on an ancient art of wood burning and telling campfire-stories. 

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Igor Termenón

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Igor Termenón plays with his cameras, shoots on a whim and has little hesitation to post his unexpected results.

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N.A.S.A-Strange Enough


What do you get when you mix N.A.S.A, Ol Dirty Bastard, Karen O, and Brazilian street artist Calma? You get this bizarre, cross genre mash up that messes with your head!

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Tod Kapke

Tod Kapke uses photography to create a wide range of imaginative illustrations.

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Shelly Mosman’s Intensely Personal Portraits

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The strength of the portraiture tradition, and what separates it from documentary photography, lies in the skill of the photographer to attach meaning and the essence of the person in a simple image. Using metaphor, subtlety, and open-ended but vaguely familiar narrative, photographer Shelly Mosman is able to imbue an intensely personal and soft-spoken beauty to her photographs. Drawn to subjects for reasons she says she often cannot immediately describe, Mosman spends a great deal of time with her subjects, waiting for key moments when their personality is revealed through action, or the subtlest of looks or gestures. “Portraiture relies on the smallest mannerisms and expressions to offer narrative,” says Mosman, “I rely on the spontaneity of circumstance.” 

The Minneapolis-based portraitist continues:

“In my photographs I negotiate and characterize the balance between my own vision and the unknown and often powerful potential given by each portrait’s subject. I am drawn to certain people for the simple reason that I know shooting them will give me an image I could never have created on my own, and because my camera can reveal something they may not have known was in themselves.  It becomes a synthesis of us both, captured in a single photograph. These connections with each subject are often too straightforward and immediate to be conscious, but rather they are something that is felt immediately, coming straight from the gut, which is the home of our instincts.”

Mosman is currently in the midst of a Kickstarter campaign to raise money for an upcoming exhibition titled Mercury. The show will feature new black and white works, printed with a long-standing (though rarely used) silver gelatin contact technique, overseen by a master printer. They will then be framed in a specially designed cast resin frames, the results of a collaboration with two sculptors. For more information or to donate, click here.

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George Boorujy

Looks like I’m on a nature kick today since George Boorujy’s insanely detailed ink drawings are the 3rd nature related post of the day!

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Engineer Zachary Abel Creates Complex Geometrical Sculptures Out Of Office Supplies And Other Household Items

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His passion for mathematics has led Zachary Abel to create geometric, science inspired sculptures made out of random elements. Paper clips, binder clips, playing cards and toothpicks are assembled according to specific formulas.

From far, the round sculptures appear uncomplicated to achieve. In actuality, Zachary Abel uses small needle-nose pliers and a schematic layout. For the Impenetraball project, the ball is comprised of 132 binder clips. The round form is obtained by assembling the binder clips one by one following a flat pattern in order to get a hollow centre and a filled surface. The designs have been so popular the talented engineer had to make a guide on how to construct the binder clip ball on his blog.

Zachary Abel in his Mathematical sculptures series is willing to share his enthusiasm for maths; replacing paint and brushes with pliers and patience. ‘Geometry in particular fascinates me, and I delight in discovering hidden patterns even in the most mundane of objects.’

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