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Awesome Video Of The Day: Lil Buck And Yo-Yo Ma

Shot by Spike Jonze this video is simply amazing! Watch as famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma and a young LA based dancer named Lil Buck collaborate on a performance that you don’t see too often.

Here’s the lowdown from Mr.Jonze himself ” The other day, I was lucky enough to be at an event to bring the arts back into schools and got to see an amazing collaboration between Yo-Yo Ma and a young dancer in LA, Lil Buck. Someone who knows Yo-Yo Ma had seen Lil Buck on YouTube and put them together. The dancing is Lil Buck’s own creation and unlike anything I’ve seen. “

Watch the full video after the jump.

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Nick Krijno’s Still LifePhotography

Nick Krijno makes blown out contemporary still lives that are the best things to look at. Made out of hot dogs, slinkies, spiders, and clothes, his images update the classic tradition in a way that everyone can get relate to and get behind. It’s a great, inspirational reminder that if you’re ever feeling down about the your staid surroundings, just organize them into an interesting composition, make a backdrop out of your friends’ shirts or some colored paper, and voilá–you’ve got yourself a modern still life. Now just paint it or take a picture of it or take a note from yoko ono and burn it. (via)

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Georgia Dickie’s Found Object Sculptures

Georgia Dickie makes sculptures by assembling found objects, most of them large, heavy, and industrial. They seem to be as much about object culture as they are about form and clutter. Unlike some of her contemporaries like Daniel Eatock who focus on common and found objects by turning them into funny absurdities, Dickie’s abstractions of objects are more serious explorations of the objects shapes and uses. But with object culture inevitably comes clutter culture, which Dickie acknowledges in her installation which resembles the back of an old man’s garage. Already in the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art at the age of 23, she has a big future waiting for her. Keep your eyes peeled! More sculptures after the jump.

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Spencer Keeton Cunningham’s Illustration And Street Art Recontextualizes Rez Life

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The scale and color density of artist Spencer Keeton Cunningham‘s work makes it almost impossible to ignore—but it’s the poignant, painful subject matter that makes his work difficult to forget. By pushing around the overly romanticized notion of North American Indian culture as a series of icons, sketches or markers, Cunningham is able to speak to the viewer through short, graphic strokes that hit hard. He’s interested in presenting his own take on the demonization of tribal people in American culture.

Being 1/4th Colville from the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (which consists of 12 different tribes: The Colville, The Entiat, the Nespelem, the Okanogan, The Arrow Lake, The Methow, The San Poil, The Chelan, The Moses Columbia, the Palus, the Nez perce, and the Wenatchee), Cunningham is able to make assertions with his work that relates to his unique position and perspective in this world.

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B/D Apparel Sneak Peak Part Two!

Beautiful/Decay Apparel Silkscreening

Another day spent working on the next season of the B/D Apparel Line. We’ll be releasing our fall  line in less than two weeks and will follow up in November with our Holiday line. As you can see we make a list and check it twice. Here are some highlights from today…

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Lauren Semivan’s Black And White Photography Digs At Our Primitive Nature

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Lauren Semivan’s black and white photography raises the dead, feels rich with ritual, and sullen from the earth. To say it is simply an abstract psychological expression would be too easy. There’s something else happening here that is magically archaic, and it’s not just the finely tailored compositions that carefully, yet seemingly casually, dig at our remains by arranging drawn fragments, bodies, vegetation, bones, and string, against a sparse backdrop. This “something else” is movement or play not just in the environment, but as or with the environment, a dreamy surreal fade that lingers.

Technically, each image is a true representation of not just what collects, but how the collection becomes. Shot with a purist sense of photography’s past, Semivan uses an early 20th century 8 x 10″ view camera and, without digital manipulation or any touch-ups at all, develops prints from a scanned large format negative. The ephemeral result, interestingly, pushes on our own anthropological or archeological impulses as a species– asking us to engage and connect with our ancestors, creatively, scientifically, and divinely.

Of her work, Semivan states, “In scientific disciplines, a line is classified as an event. Something as primitive as a scrawl on a surface reveals an aggregate of events, intersecting and changing course. Drawings made on the seamless backdrop describe an emotional space. Science is inherently experiential, as is art making. Knowing and feeling are not separate, and the whole of the environment can be used as a pedagogic instrument. Observatory elegantly draws upon a tension that exists between irrational and physical worlds. Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings.”

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Made With Color Presents: Benjamin Grossblat’s Twisted Celebrity Illustrations

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We’re keeping the steady stream of amazing artwork coming as a part of our partnership with premiere website building platform Made With Color. Each week we bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who are using Made With Color to create clean and sleek websites. Made With Color sites aren’t just good looking, they are extremely easy to set up with no coding involved and an intuitive user interface that makes building a site a breeze. This week we are delighted to bring you the kooky and humorous  celebrity illustrations of Benjamin Grossblat!

Benjamin Grossblat’s illustrations are fanciful, innocent and twisted at the same time. And no more is this evident than in his celebrity portraits. In his portraits Morgan Freeman is almost boyish with his curly lashes, freckles and sparkly eyes while Kim Jong Il is an endlessly wrinkly amorphous blob with mustard yellow teeth.  The faces of these famous figures are instantly recognizable, by distorting them, Benjamin manages to capture their essence; the portraits have a certain vulnerability and humor that makes even the scowling Trump more likeable.

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Women Take To The Streets Wearing Menstrual Blood Stains

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Fed up with the shame surrounding their periods, the Spanish performance collective Sangre Menstrual took over the public streets in sets of white pants stained with menstrual blood. This performance artwork was politically motivated; as the group writes in their “Manifesto for the Visibility of the Period,” the taboo surrounding menstruation serves to oppress women and reinforce patriarchal systems.

By making a public display of their shedding uterine linings, the group hopes to reclaim the female body and free normal bodily functions from shame and judgement. Since the earliest books of the bible and before, menstruation has been viewed as unclean, and often women have even been kept separate from men during their periods. Sangre Menstrual, whose name literally translates to “menstrual blood,” intends to change all that. In their manifesto, the group of women write, “I stain [my pants], and it doesn’t make me sick. I stain [my pants] and I don’t find it disgusting.”

The implications of Sangre Menstrual’s street performance extend beyond menstruation and into larger debates surrounding reproduction and the female body. Like the feminist artist Barbara Kruger and her legendary print “Your Body Is A Battlefield,” the blood-stained performance aims to present the body as a political act of defiance. The manifesto states, “the visibility of the period [is meant] to increase the visibility of the body, as political space.” Do patriarchal, sexist institutions persist in part because of the repulsion with which we treat menstruation? Is this work of art a groundbreaking innovation or a silly shock tactic? (via BUST)

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