Get Social:

Snack Bang! The Photography of Exploding Food

Ryan Matthew Smith - photographRyan Matthew Smith - photograph Ryan Matthew Smith - photograph Ryan Matthew Smith - photograph

Photographer Ryan Matthew Smith takes photos of exploding food for his publication Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking. Since April 2008 he has amassed over 140,000 photos. Using a high speed camera recording at 6200 frames per second, Smith is able to capture a side of food that we normally can’t witness.

His subjects are anything from sausages to saucepans. He photographs hamburgers bursting apart – mayonnaise caught in the act of falling, tossed salads being frozen in mid-air. Smith explodes his food and accessories with the help of a bullet – fired from a 308 sniper rifle and travels at roughly 2800 feet per second at the point of impact, it creates the perfect environment for his photographs.

Elaborately posed, his objects stand out on his starkly minimal backgrounds – usually matt black. He shows cross sections of woks, elements, flames and pots, creating images reminiscent of modern abstract compositions. Smith says of his technique:

‘I had a pretty good understanding of compositing but given the large amount and complexity of photo illustration I spent many hours on Photoshop trying to find new ways to blend images together smoothly and quickly’.

Smith thrives on imbuing the mundane with life and motion. His photographs are a perfect display of what is it like to be caught in the maelstrom of food preparation, or destruction.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Documentary Watch: Married To The Eiffel Tower

married to the eiffel tower

I usually love nutty and bizarre documentaries but I challenge anyone to find a documentary on a more disturbing and messed up subject matter. Married To The Eiffel Tower explores the world of Objectum Sexuals. You’re probably wondering “what’s that?” Well it’s when a human has an emotional and sexual relationship with an object such as a fence, archery bow, banister, bridge, and yes, even the Eiffel Tower. That’s right folks. There is a group of people out there (40 known cases around the world) who fall in love and have sex with buildings and other nonliving objects that we use everyday.

See a women straddle a beam of the Eiffel Tower and groan with pleasure, Watch as a middle aged lady makes out with the Berlin wall, and witness an emotional and passionate woman rub the grease and fluid from a theme park ride all over her body. You’re probably thinking I’m making this up as an early April Fools joke but even I can’t come up with a story like this. Married To The Eiffel Tower is the most bizarre documentary of all time. No books, brochures, or even Wikipedia could ever explain how fully functional adults could end up this way. It’s the ultimate freakish car crash and your front seat ticket is right after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

ori carino’s Art Brings Together Tibet And European Aesthetics

Ori Carino works with techniques, compositional elements and aesthetic styles from classical Tibetan and European art. He juxtaposes Tibetan art’s unique synthesis of the pantheon of decorative painting and textile techniques of the east, including refined and sophisticated brush stroke technique, with western methods like perspective, foreshortening, and rendering. Additionally he uses an airbrush, as a mini spray-paint can at times and for applying a glaze at others – going back and forth between gesture and wash and between classical and contemporary. In the end, it’s smooth glazes, opulent and elaborate surfaces, embossed gold, and rich color, all to reveal the horror, comedy, sex and drama unfolding as a divine play.

Currently Trending

Rena Littleson’s The Truth About Drugs

 

It’s funny how “facts” “evidence” and “reality” have a way of changing over time. How do they decide where the line between legal and illegal lies? Sometimes it’s anyone’s guess. Though probably money related. Rena Littleson’s The Truth About Drugs series of graphic illustrations explores these topics and more after the jump.

Currently Trending

27 Miles Of Scotch Tape Used To Create A Labyrinth Of Tunnels In The Sky

SetWidth960-IMG20692

Numen - Installation

Numen - Installation

COS-×-PALAIS-DE-TOKYO-3

Numen, a European design collective, used 27 miles of scotch tape to create their most recent installation at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. We’ve posted about Numen’s jungle gym and flexible staircase before on Beautiful/Decay, and they’ve caught our eye once again! Viewers/participants are allowed to explore translucent tunnels that weave around columns and down staircases, mid air. The installation belongs to a group show called ‘Inside’ that “delves into the murky territory of both physical and psychological interiority, thematising immersion, introspection, and probing of the depths of self.”

Numen says their intention was to…

“transform the whole building into a convulsive mind/body organism whose slippery inner limits a motivated explorer has yet to trace and confront. The stretched biomorphic skin of Tape Paris is marking the entry point of the whole experience, being a literal incarnation of an inner-directed, regressive environment – the sense of descent into the primordial always lingering around its openings.”

…A lot to basically say that Numen has created an installation that seems like throughways for blood cells or passageways through time, and looks like it would be incredibly fun to crawl around in. It’s impressive in terms of engineering, imagination, and entertainment value, and it’s not hard to see how it relates to “interiority”, though I wouldn’t have put it in such convoluted terms. I might sound bitter about their project statement, but that’s probably because I can’t get myself to Paris to experience the real thing! (Via The Fox is Black)

Currently Trending

Grotesque Photos Capture The Pains And Joys Of Womanhood

madison_carroll_03bmadison_carroll_03madison_carroll_11madison_carroll_13

In her visceral, raw still lifes, the 21-year-old photographer Madison Carroll captures the grotesque remains of meaningful moments gone by. Used condoms, pregnancy tests, and blood stains grace her compositions, punctuating a narrative that skips dizzyingly from girlhood to womanhood, from innocence to experience. As if plucked from last night’s waste basket, these soiled items emerge; in the context of Carroll’s clean, immaculate technique, they become all the more haunting.

As if part of some unusual crime scene, waste products are left out, forensically archived by Carroll’s lens. Here, rotting fruit and old bandaids mark not a murder but the more gradual, subtle trauma of growing up, of being woman. Like a pool of blood, tea spills from a delicate, shattered china cup; a lemon, once fresh and aromatic, rots. An egg cracks, the yoke spilling out into a satin pair of Victoria’s Secret underwear like a giant, monstrous ovum released during menstruation.

In Carroll’s disturbing yet thrilling realm, the dangers and joys of femaleness collide in a moment of brutal self-reflection. Death and fertility become indistinguishable. In a frilly, feminine doily, a cockroach lies dead, rotting beside a snuffed-out cigarette. A Clear Blue pregnancy test sits on an old rust-stained rag, the urine and tissue in the toilet simply a blurred afterthought.

Like a hoarder of significant items, Carroll’s lens seeks out that which might be thrown away, forgotten by time. A male lover, sprawled on the bed, is captured asleep, in a state of heightened vulnerability, his pale nakedness pressing against the border of the frame. At the artist’s feet, a condom evidences the intimacy that occurred minutes or hours before. (via Feature Shoot and iGNANT)

Currently Trending

Tattoo Artists Ink Over Mastectomy Scars With Empowering And Personal Designs

P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos

Tattoos have been personal and symbolic to a lot of people for a long time, and these tattoos mean a whole lot to these women for a very heart warming reason. P.ink is a collection of artists who team up with breast cancer survivors and ink designs over their mastectomy scars. The aim of the group is to help women who have won the battle with cancer feel happy to look in the mirror again; so that they want to look at their breasts once more, and not only to be reminded of the pain and suffering they have experienced.

For most of these women who choose to get tattooed, the inking process represents gaining control back over what has happened to their bodies. Not only do the images cover the physical scars, but they also lessen the emotional and psychological scars the cancer has created.

Launched in 2013, along with Molly’s story, P.ink has bought together 47 artists and 48 survivors, in over 12 locations around the United States in the few years it has been operational. With over 2.6 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S alone, it was clear a lot of women needed a way to celebrate their battle with the disease. Over 56% of those survivors are left with visible scarring and often no nipples, and adding tattoos to the area after surgery is a beautiful way to turn something that was avoided into something worth celebrating and showing off.

You can donate to P.ink now, or learn more about becoming a survivor participant. (Via Bored Panda)

Currently Trending

Elaine Reicheck Abandons Painting To Create Embroidery Art

Elaine Reicheck Elaine Reicheck Elaine Reicheck

Elaine Reicheck is a New York-based artist who uses embroidery to explore conceptual and aesthetic ideas in art.  Though she has a background in painting, actually receiving an MFA from Yale in the subject, she began to question her training and wonder what kind of statement she wanted to make with her art.  Though she experimented with knitting wool, hand-paining found photographs and other techniques, embroidery emerged as Reicheck’s material of choice.  She creates beautiful works on linen using needle and thread.

Though she does quite a bit of her work by hand, Reichek  also experiments with computerized sewing.  She doesn’t feel this is a shortcut in anyway, as her work is as much about the concept as it is the end result.

There is also an undoubtedly feminist aspect to Reicheck’s work.  She attributes it to working with so many male painters during her training.  Embroidery, a historically feminine pastime, allows Reichek to explore the same ideas as her male painter counterparts, but, as she says, “if I make them that way, of course their meaning changes, since the meaning of an artwork is always bound with its media and processes and their history.”

Usually selecting a theme to base a series around, Reichek’s latest embroiders consider the myth of Ariadne.  Ariadne gave Theseus a ball of thread with which to retrace his steps allowing him to escape the Minotaur’s labyrinth.  Reichek created art-historical portraits, many of which contain Araidne’s image, and paired them with quotes from literary sources such as Nietzsche or Catullus.

Currently Trending