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Paul Blow

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I love Paul Blow‘s witty and pithy illustrations (such as this obviously confused cat). His sense of humor relays a story without trying too hard. His illustrations have appeared in the likes of Business Week and the Boston Globe, giving him the opportunity to play around with popular culture and politics.

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brian tolle’s Soft Houses

Brian Tolle’s soft silicone sculptures of mass produced houses are juxtaposed with a variety of found objects resulting in hilarious juxtapositions and unusually delightful pairings.

 

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Beautiful/Decay Spring ’09 & Summer at Agenda

 

Beautiful/Decay will debut our Spring ‘09/Summer ‘09 seasons at Agenda in San Diego this week, Jan. 22-24—booth #J3.

Spring and Summer 09 will feature iconic graphics from Beautiful/Decay Magazine Issue Y featured cover artist, Jesse Auersalo, and the hyper-colored psychedelic visions of previously featured artist Oliver Hibert. Designer James Callahan returns to the fold with some new, head-exploding graphics, alongside many other eye popping Beautiful/Decay artists.

For a sneak peak, check out the Agenda Tradeshow magazine, Antenna –they featured our wares in their product guide!

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The New Beauty: Aleah Chapin’s Unabashed Paintings Of Nude Women

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin‘s oil painting series The Aunties is an intimate, realistic, immodest look at a women’s world, as seen and experienced by a woman. The models featured are actually the artist’s mother’s friends, women who she has grown up with, and with whom she has a personal, unadulterated knowledge of. Chapin hasn’t spared any detail in her oversized portraits – we see the female figure in all of it’s beauty. Breasts are saggy, stomach rolls are bunched up, stretchmarks are on full display, pubic hair untamed and exposed, and thighs are dimpled with fatty cellulite.

Full of tender moments between mother and son, or groups of friends, her work is a strong counterpoint to the idealized and unrealistic female body images we are confronted with daily. She says about the subject:

Most women have issues and I’m not immune to that. We’re told that our bodies are supposed to be a ‘certain height, certain size, certain weight’. But the pictures we see are completely unrealistic; they’re very Photoshopped. We all know it when we look at them in magazines and yet, we still compare ourselves. That’s why we need images that show all sorts of bodies – so we can accept every size and shape. (Source)

Chapin paints women in a playful, relaxed, completely natural state. She tries to capture a childlike spirit, which is in all of us, no matter our age or gender. She says:

We generally care more what we look like – probably too much at times, me included. Young women are still trying to fit in. I think when you get older you care less –that’s not a negative thing at all. You’re just more accepting. When you get past a certain age you become invisible – and that’s a whole other problem. For me, it’s about finding beauty in every imperfection. (Source) (Via Hi Fructose)

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The Cut Paper City Sculptures of Matthew Picton

Matthew Picton sculpture9

Matthew Picton sculpture10Matthew Picton sculpture2

 

The work of Matthew Picton is something more than a map, even something more than a model city.  He meticulously builds cities from paper.  Each buildings wall is built from a strip of paper leaving its interior empty.  In a way his three dimensional maps get at the personality of a city.  Speaking about cartography Picton says,

“There is some intrinsic quality to cartography that goes beyond the scientific document – a beauty of form and detail, a record of past times and places, something that lives as a world in which imagination can flow; places to re-visit, places to re-imagine, a world to re-make itself in the imagination.”     [via]

Several of his pieces depict cities before and after a natural disaster or war.  The charred strips of paper mark burnt or crumbled buildings.  Pockets of burnt paper seem more like injuries than a cold record of a past fact.

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Sigmar Polke’s Work To Be Shown In Tate Modern In October

Sigmar Polke- Multimedia Artist Sigmar Polke- Multimedia Artist Sigmar Polke- Multimedia Artist Sigmar Polke- Multimedia Artist

Although he has been dead a few years, the enigmatic and masterfully talented Sigmar Polke (1941- 2010) is not soon to be forgotten. Largely evasive of being pin-pointed into any one area of craft, Polke was an exceptional postwar generation artist who crossed all genres and utilized his excessive wit and intelligence to comment on the world he lived in. The largest showing of his work to date is being presented at various museums in the world. Having just closed at the MoMA in New York, it will open up for exhibition at the Tate Modern in October 2014 before going to the Museum Ludwig in Germany in 2015.

The exhibition write-up from the MoMA show summarizes his legacy:

“Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

Beneath Polke’s irreverent wit, promiscuous intelligence, and chance operations lay a deep skepticism of all authority—artistic, familial, religious, and governmental. It would be impossible to understand this attitude, and the creativity that grew out of it, without considering Polke’s biography and its setting in twentieth-century European history: in 1945, near the end of World War II, his family fled Silesia (in present-day Poland) for what would soon be Soviet-occupied East Germany, and then escaped again, this time to West Germany, in 1953. Polke grew up at a time when many Germans deflected blame for the atrocities of the Nazi period with the alibi “I didn’t see anything.”

Polke scrutinized the malleability of vision. Highly attuned to the differences between appearance and reality, he was wary of the notion that there might be one universal truth. His relentlessly inventive works, ranging in size from the intimacy of a notebook to monumental paintings, collapse conventional distinctions—between high culture and low, figuration and abstraction, the heroic and the banal—allowing flux, rather than stability, to prevail.”

Don’t forget to go to London and see it in person! It’s only a plane away!

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Ari Abramczyk

Ari Abramczyk

Ari Abramczyk is a Los Angeles based fashion photographer specializing in underwater photography. I love how Abramczyk creates an added layer of interest in her photos with vivid colors and light patterns. She really utilizes the unique qualities of water in her photos. Granted, all things underwater look pretty cool, Abramczyk just makes it cooler.

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Markus Hofko Is Full Of Surprises

Designer Markus Hofkos’s work is exceptionally clever and wonderfully surprising. Check out his new website!

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