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Jenny Fine Reanimates Her Dead Grandmother

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American artist Jenny Fine creates Flat Granny, a life-sized cardboard cut-out of her grandmother. The artist is interested in creating a tangible ‘thing’ that would resemble her dear, and very influential relative. With this cut-out, she attempts to extend a relationship beyond death. Apart from the cutout, Fine goes a bit further and develops a more’ carnal’ approach to the cut-out of her grandmother…

In an interest to reanimate her still image, I turned Flat Granny’s photographic body into a costume.

The bizarre, yet endearing idea is inspired by Victorian traditions of post-mortem photography, as well as the novel concept of a Flat Daddy/Mommy , photographic cut-outs of deployed soldiers for their children/ family while the soldier is away at war.

The photographs you see here feel and look surreal. However, there is no way to escape these vibes when you are looking at an object that in essence represents the absence of someone dearly missed and loved. This project is personal, but it also goes deeper than just a moving gesture from a loving granddaughter. It brings forth the realities of our attachment to the physical world- and the physical body, as well as the lengths we would go to in order to fill that void we feel when we’ve lost someone important in our lives.

Can something like this do the trick? Or would it be just plain weird and inappropriate?

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Bart Erkamp’s Photos Prove That Pole Dancing Is A Sport

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In recent years, the rising popularity of pole dance fitness has probably conjured up images of darkened strip clubs rather than a serious workout. Netherlands-based Bart Erkamp thought the former, but during the summer of last year, his attitude changed. He dated a woman involved in the sport and learned about its inner workings. It’s a physically demanding activity that’s much more than just an erotic dance. His series titled Pole Fitness highlights the strength and talent needed to complete the moves, which are often suspended in air.

After learning about the sport, Erkamp attended a championship pole fitness competition in Amsterdam. The power and agility of the athletes impressed him, and this struck him as comparable to “artistic gymnastics,” that highlights physical prowess and self expression.

In addition to their athletics, Erkamp was enthralled by the dedication of the participants. They’ve installed poles in their bedrooms, living rooms, and even next to their kitchen. Location doesn’t matter. He highlights this in his subjects’ clear, neatly-kept homes. Contorted legs, torsos, and arms are wrapped around bright silver poles.

It’s not all women, either. Erkamp explains that in 2014, several men completed at the World Championships in Rio de Janeiro. And, there’s even a possibility that it’ll be an official Olympic sport in 2016. (Via Feature Shoot)

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Ghosts & Other Practical Visual Jokes

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Ghost

 

 
Robert Gligorov’s  work attempts to shock the viewer. Each piece tantalizes the imagination, awakening it from a state of lethargy. Confronting a society accustomed to sophisticated and extreme forms of visual communication, Gligorov amplifies the shock value of his work in order to compete with the deluge of images that cloud our visual field. Gligrov  lives and works in Milan, Italy and is represented by Aeroplastics Contemporary in Belgium,  and Galerie Pascal Vanhoecke in Paris. More images of his work after the jump.

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NYC Subway Cars Transformed Into Articificial Reefs

Stephen Mallon’s Next Stop Atlantic is a stunning series of photographs, which capture the retirement of hundreds of New York City Subway cars to the depths of the Atlantic Ocean.

In a bold move, the NYC Transit authority joined the artificial reef building program off the East Coast of the US in 2000 and sent stripped and decontaminated subway cars off on barges to be dropped into the Ocean in order to build refuge for many species of fish and crustaceans which would colonize the structures.

Mallon traces the progress of the train cars on their way towards their last voyage, majestic waves approach the viewer in these large scale photographs as they too are transported out to sea to behold the lifting and transfer of these massive machines. One photograph hauntingly depicts elements of nature creeping into their barren hulls, drifts of snow lines the walkways, a glimpse of sunshine streams through their removed doors as they wait in stacks to be carted off to sink to the dark depths of the ocean floor.

Mallon’s photographs elicit both the sadness and the beauty of cascading water overtaking these iconic figures of New York transit as they sink beneath the surface of the water; surges and sprays are caught in time. Stephen Mallon dedicated the last three years to following this endeavor, chronicling the last phase of NYC Transit’s involvement in this program. The photographs that are presented in this exhibition capture the grandiosity of this effort; the weight of these 18-ton train cars can be felt as they are ferried off and plunged into the water.

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Nick Cave

Chicago artist Nick Cave’s outlandish “soundsuits” have enough awesome going on standing still, but these intricate assemblages are also performance costumes. Grab a copy of Beautiful/Decay Book 4 for a sprawling feature on Cave with tons more (giant, gorgeous) images and an interview in which he discusses his recent exhibition at the Fowler museum, his process creating the suits, and his desire for art to be a joyous community-wide experience.

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Local Bay Area Artists Seize The Day At Loakal Gallery In Oakland,CA

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John Wentz

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Jet Martinez

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Cameron Thompson

On March 29, 2014 19 artists gathered at Loakal Gallery to live-paint 19 different works that would later be part of Carpe Diem, a 24-hour art show.  Each artist was given a 4′ by 8′ panel and 24 hours to complete their work. The gallery was open to the public all 24 hours of the painting day so that people could engage with the artists and observe them at work.

From street artists to classically trained painters, they all showcased their process in a way that resembled a happening- the idea of the painters’ performance was one of main ingredient is the uniqueness of this show. The artists, challenged to complete a 4′ by 8′ panel within a tight time frame, had the opportunity to perform and, at the same time, engage with spectators. Viewers not only had the chance to observe but actually participate in the process- chance was very much a part of this 24-hour art making extravaganza.

Apart from creating and sharing the process with spectators, the artist were able to engage and work with each other. For many of the artists, art is typically a solo act, done alone in one’s studio, while street artists and muralists like Ian Ross, Hueman and Nite Owl had more experience with being out in the open while creating their work. During the event, the artists involved turned to each other with a more social approach.

Full list of participating artists: Jessica Hess, Ian Ross, Hueman, Reggie Warlock, Chris Granillo, Eddie Colla, Cameron Thompson, Brett Amory, Lisa Pisa, Nite Owl, John Wentz, John Casey, Marcos LaFarga, Jet Martinez, Cannon Dill, Lauren YS, Zoltron, Max Kauffman and Daryll Peirce.

Loakal is located in the Jack London Square district of Oakland and is open 7 days a week to the public. The entire show is on view until April 28,2014. (via Huff Post)

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Alicia Watkins’ Clever And Cute Microbe Embroidery

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Alicia Watkins

Alicia Watkins

Alicia Watkins

There’s not much information about Alicia Watkins‘ scientific embroidery, but we can all agree the project is a fun way to identify potentially harmful microbes. From anthrax to salmonella, herpes, e.coli, toxoplasma, mono, botulism, and the common cold, Watkins has colorfully cross-stiched many well-known bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Some of these dreadful microbes almost appear cute by Watkins’ careful hand, associating the warmth and comfort that cross-stitching evokes with the coldness of threatening diseases and sicknesses. Watkins’ Etsy store, appropriately named Watty’s Wall Stuff, has these stiched microbes available for purchase at $19.99 each, along with other clever and pop culture influenced cross-stitch work. She also takes custom orders, as well as making some of her patterns available for purchase. (via this isn’t happiness)

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Claire Falkenberg’s Eerily Painted Apparitions

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With a toxic mix of oil-based paint, the surfaces of artist Claire Falkenberg‘s large-scale photos are transformed into mysterious and eerie clouds.  The ominous, milky clouds obscure the space directly in front of the photographer, delaying the viewer’s ability to understand what lies just under the surface of each picture plane. This inclusion is generous, because it offers another layer of surface detail to the viewer who is willing to inspect the ghostly swirls of oil paint. The slick, snapshot-style images of trash slowly begin to reveal themselves—vanishing almost entirely at the center, and bringing into question just exactly what Falkenberg has chosen to cover up in her series.

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