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WhiteWhiteBrownTwig

26_map2 The people over at WhiteWhiteBrownTwig, the collective work of artist and photographer Emma Parry, and graphic artist Joel Galvin, are pumping out some pretty cool artwork. If your in need of some refreshing work check them out.

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Deniz Ozuygur

ImSorry2010

Deniz Ozuygur’s pieces appear to be completely unconnected explorations. However, the common thread uniting Ozuygur’s varied and imaginative work is that each piece embodies a different character. These characters have their own stories and musings, often derived from the artist’s own past. From Funyuns to balloons, Ozuygur is certainly not afraid of experimentation.

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B/D Back Issue Sale Ends Wednesday At Midnight!

Calling all you completists! Forget about your vintage coin collection and enjoy The Beautiful/Decay Back Issue Sale! Once upon a time only Czars and Royalty could complete their B/D collection, but now you, too, can complete your collection on the cheap. We’re talking over55% off all back issues for one week! Take advantage and complete your collection of the most comprehensive art and design magazine today!

Sale Ends: This Wednesday at Midnight!

 

 

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Gina Osterloh

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In “Shooting Blanks,” Gina Osterloh combines installation and preforming arts featuring herself on a paper stage. Her latest works, including “The Rash Room,” “The Cut Room,” and “The Turquoise Room,” are staged for the camera with Osterloh as the main subject enclosed in rooms of brightly colored bond paper. However, the candy colored walls frame a darker matter; Osterloh obscures her face behind her hair and often covers her entire body in paper strips, toying with the notion of identity crisis. In each installation, she slowly removes herself from the room, and is gradually eaten by the empty space, leaving behind a vacancy that echos that emptiness, or “blankness.”

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Aaron Moran

Aaron Moran’s geometric reclaimed wood sculptures look like prehistoric wooden meteors that came from an ancient petrified wooden planet.

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GEORGES HUGNET: THE LOVE LIFE OF THE SPUMIFERS

Ubu Gallery is pleased to present GEORGES HUGNET: THE LOVE LIFE OF THE SPUMIFERS, an exhibition of hand-painted photographic postcards by the eminent Surrealist artist, poet, bookbinding designer and critic. These bizarre, lusciously painted images illustrate Hugnet’s work, The Love Life of the Spumifers, where each accompanying text poetically and humorously catalogues the mating habits of a fantastical creature or Spumifer.

The Love Life of the Spumifers, or La Vie Amoureuse des Spumifères, combines Surrealist poetry’s fascination with l’amour and Dada’s tendency towards deliberate grammatical spontaneity and absurdity. Made-up words, like bowoodlingfriskadoodling and alabamaraminating, are concocted to describe the seductive strategies of his imaginary creatures. Each text is dedicated to a different creature, describing how it woos, teases, gropes and molests its intended love conquest. Each Spumifer is illustrated by a gouache “beast,” which is added to an early Twentieth Century vintage “French” photo postcard. The mellifluously painted monsters slyly slither around the bare flesh of the pictured “mademoiselle,” nibbling and tickling, arousing her sexual desire. Hugnet’s illustrations seduce the viewer, parodying the human pursuit of love and lovemaking through these adorable grotesques.

Hugnet realized the series The Love Life of the Spumifers during 1947–48 and wrote the accompanying texts in the early 1960s. The whereabouts of four of the 40 original Spumifers intended to complete the series are at present unknown. Hugnet composed only 33 texts and one of those texts accompanied a missing work. He created a number of additional Spumifers, maybe as many as 20, which were not part of the final 40 which he had intended to publish as a book. The show is on view until January 28th, 2012.

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Bela Borsodi’s Balloon Caricatures Pose For The Camera In These Ridiculously Cute Portraits

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi - balloons

Bela Borsodi is a prolific image maker. And not only does he make brightly colored, cartoonish images by taking photos of balloons wearing funny costumes. Since 1999 he has been taking photographs of still lifes full of humor, optical illusions, weird proportions, color play, and whimsical objects. His work may look like child’s play, but his clients have included Vogue Russia, Bloomingdales, H&M, Puma, Target, Hermes and Swarovski. His hilarious campaigns feature sunglasses casually draped on blocks of cheese, faces made out of folded clothes, outfits worn by invisible people and masked figures juggling shoes. The Austrian photographer says:

I love making things and putting things in an unusual context incorporating various visual languages coming from art and graphic design–eroticism is also a fascination of me that I love exploring. (Source)

Borsodi has a knack for turning the plainest things into something surreal and wonderful. By simply styling, or suggesting a few details, he can animate mundane objects into jovial caricatures. Add a wig to a balloon and it is no longer an inflated bit of latex, but now it is suddenly transformed into Marge Simpson. Or add a few brooches and faux fur to pink balloon, and we go from a child’s party to a drag show. Or another one: just fasten a tie, a belt, wrap on sunglasses and place a pile of string on a strangely shaped balloon, and we now see a boss trying to party on Casual Friday. Borsodi goes on:

Often when you only change the context of things you can find new meaning. Or you add something to an object or you take something away from it. Or you put it upside down. All this can change it – a glass put upside down loses all its original function and becomes just a “thing”. (Source)

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Shelley Reed’s Black And White History

I adore Shelley Reed‘s paintings. I love that she paints them in black and white, which remind me of the reproductions in old art history books.

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