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Caterina Rossato’s 3D Layered Postcard Landscapes

Caterina Rossato - Collage Caterina Rossato - Collage Caterina Rossato - Collage Caterina Rossato - Collage

Caterina Rossato creates 3D layered landscapes out of old postcards. She seeks to evoke both the familiar and the alien, the specific and the general. “I create landscapes made through a collage of other landscapes, combining images in which the sense of recognition of reality slips from one level to another and it is never clearly identified,” Rossato says in an artist’s statement.

The series, named “Deja Vu” plays with the idea of recognition and the sensation of recognition. Rossato explains: 
 
“The déjà vu is a psychic phenomenon which is part of the forms of alteration of memories (paramnesie): it consists in the erroneous sensation of having seen an image or of having lived previously an event or a situation that is occurring. Although improperly, it is also called ‘false recognition.'”

It’s interesting that she chose to use postcards, which often enable us to live vicariously through friends and family who are traveling abroad. In a sense, we’ve heard about the locations and they are familiar to us in name and description; however, we often haven’t traveled to those distant lands, not enough to know them personally or to have seen them up close. In a way, Rossato’s work brings up the question of how we can truly know something — or know that we know something. (via I Need a Guide)

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Skeletal Structures

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Diana Al-Hadid’s work remind me of skeletons that are piled on top of one another to form large cathedral like buildings. See more images at the Perry Rubenstien Gallery website.

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Keegan Mchargue Interview

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Always jazzed to find exceptional young talent like Keegan Mchargue .  His color palettes, compositions, and ridiculously healthy body of work  are but few of the numerous positive qualities found in Keegan’s product. I was fortunate enough to have a series of exchanges with Mr. Mchargue and gain some further insight into his practice. Word

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MAO YANYANG

While combining realism and expressionism, Mao Yanyang new works surprises the observer with very audacious paintings. Using daily broadcasted images he appeals to the spectator’s collective and individual memory shaped true years of media confrontation.

But there’s a very big difference between those known images and Mao Yanyang’s Works. The audacity of the artist’s ideas is expressed true the constant presence of several microphones in every single one of his paintings. This presence might seem kind of irrelevant and surreal, certainly when the artist is depicting war scenes, but they symbolize in fact the transformation of our world into an image consuming universe.

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Urban Camouflage


Creepy and funny is always a good combination. Follow-up to earier post of Urban Camouflages photographs from a while back, but the videos seem to add a new dimension to their work.  I want to see more interaction with the shoppers and store employees though, but i’m probably missing the point.

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Ted Sabarese

Artist Ted Sabarese is a jack of all trades. He is a graphic designer, fiction writer, and photographer. The series pictured above is amazing!

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Paintings Of Corrupted Disney Characters Being Naughty

Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Disney Characters  Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Oil Painting Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Oil Painting Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Oil Painting

Remember the urban legends that Disney movies had ‘sex’ written in the stars or that Aladdin whispers “good teenagers take off their clothes”? Artist Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros took that imagery to heart, and much further, in his series Dishollywood. The artist depicts Disney characters in rebellion, experimenting with substances, sexuality, or pairs them with pop-culture icons. Ontiveros is trying to show that these characters are ours to experiment with, and that we may appropriate them as we like, and combine them with what we like, to create new and contemporary characters.

“It is a collection of visual curiosities that pushes the audience to reimagine the world of pop as a personalized mash-up with the freedom to merge situations, rewrite the script, and provide new dialogue in alternative scenarios to tell new stories.

 

DisHollywood is also a barometer for measuring our tolerance and acceptance levels; a new way of observing the “happy ending” that trumpets the time of equality is now. In contrast to the baroque fantasy implied by the original, idealized presentation of these characters, a new context of social vulnerability shows the darker side of our contemporary society.”

Some of it does demonstrate the degenerate side of our culture. Tiana – whose name is suspiciously close to Rihanna’s to begin with – is shown as a mashup with the pop-star, with bruises on her face, presumably post-Chris Brown. In a way the images do a good job of highlighting our sometimes-questionable behavior without lecturing. The characters who are originally totally pure, are defiled, making them more real, and also making our reality seem darker in that contrast. It’s also just hilarious to see Minnie Mouse and Daisy Duck taking hits from the bong, though. (Via Huffington Post)

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Beth Campbell’s Artwork Is Toying With Your Perception

Blue Lamps, 2010

Blue Lamps, 2010

Stereo Table, 2012

Stereo Table, 2012

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

My parent’s bathroom at the house I first lived in had a full-length mirror behind the sink, which also had a mirror.  As soon as I was tall enough to see over the counter, I remember staring at an infinite number of my own reflections bouncing back and forth and I recall the frustration that I could never find where the reflections ended.  This is the memory invoked when I saw Beth Campbell’s work for the first time.

Working in a variety of mediums: drawings, sculpture and what she calls “architectural interventions,” Campbell’s body of work toys with perception.  Her Potential Future Based on Present Circumstances drawing series maps possible outcomes to present decisions.  These were the first works I saw by Campbell and I recall thinking how brilliant, but impossible they were.  Like me and my reflection in the mirror, Campbell was trying to make sense of the unrealistic and perhaps impractical idea that we can know what might have been.  Their humor and neurosis seemed so quintessentially human to me that I became an instant lover of her work.

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