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Nan Na Hvass

Scandinavians are best at all things in my mind- but if I had to narrow it down to two genres, I’d have to pick design and music. Here is a wonderful example of the two realms combining: Nan Na Hvass’ lovely illustrations and animation for Efterklang’s single, Mirador. I love her candy palette.

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Erin McCarty

Erin McCarty paints from somewhere deep within. Her colorful, chaotic paintings often channel fear, anguish, and desire in ways that are palpable. The bold leaf- and crystal-like motifs used throughout seem somehow magically charged. All in all, I find it hard to believe that this artist is fairly fresh out of art school. It must be that the cold, crisp air of Alaska stimulates her creativity.

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Kour Pour Recreates Carpets In Every Painstaking Detail

Kour Pour - PaintingKour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting

Taking images from auction catalogs, artist Kour Pour translates intricately-patterned carpets onto paneled surfaces. The multi-step process is labor intensive, not to mention large – his work is 8 feet tall. First, Pour scans in the image of a rug and burns it on a silk screen. Then, he uses a broom to begin his underpainting (the texture gives it an appearance of a textile). Afterwards, he silkscreens the design to the panel and begins the work of painting every painstaking detail. The final step is to use an electrical sander to erase the painted surface and expose the layers of the under-painting. What results is work that looks like an faded, well-worn rug.

Pour is both British and Persian, and when he was younger, his father owned a rug shop in England. His work is tied to this past, as he explains in his artist statement:

Carpets were a part of my childhood growing up in England. I remember my Father’s rug shop, and how he would hand-dye sections of carpets that had faded away, in order to bring them back to their original colours. I felt that in doing this, my Father was making an effort to maintain all their history and meaning, as if he was bringing the carpets back to life. When I first moved to Los Angeles I had feelings of displacement and much like the faded carpets, I too felt a part of my history disappear. I started the carpet painting series and noticed how art and objects could play an increasingly important role in our diverse society. Through making these paintings I am constantly learning more about my background and the rich mix of culture that surrounds me and the carpets.

By recreating carpets, Pour highlights their meaning as object, as well as the implications of their surface design. They signify an object of privilege (as their originals come from an auction catalog), and our commodity-based consumer culture. Beyond that, the patterns of animals and men on horses is representational of globalization, a culture’s history, and more.  (Via Bmore Art and Flat Surface)

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Colby Vincent Edwards’ Post-Apocalyptic Existence

Colby Vincent Edwards - Photography/Costume Design

Colby Vincent Edwards - Photography/Costume Design

Colby Vincent Edwards - Photography/Costume Design

Colby Vincent Edwards - Photography/Costume Design

In 2011, photographer Colby Vincent Edwards (in collaboration with William Franevsky and Jarrett Scherff) created The 8th Day, an incredible exhibition that “documents” a post-apocalyptic future. In addition to black and white photography, the artists designed costumes made of leather, cloth, feathers, twine, and bone. Dusty, ripped, and layered, the outfits integrate brilliantly with the wasted environment. The weapons the models carry seem ancient, but upon closer inspection betray the remnants of the present-day world: shattered metal and protruding nails.

The photographs themselves are stark and intimate, composed of “high contrasts with rich blacks, and blank white collodion skies” (Source). We see human figures traversing barren plains, salvaging debris, and collapsing in what could be sorrow, exhaustion, or near-death. With their faces masked, the characters’ physical anonymity makes it possible to imagine oneself in their place, navigating the devastated world. Here, the artists have drawn on the appeal of our childhood fantasies, but have troubled them by infusing such imaginative stories with the tragedy and finality of a cataclysmic event. Step back from the beautiful details and you perceive the vast emptiness of the world.

Even though the exhibition is a few years old, the images are still intensely relevant. Depictions of post-apocalyptic worlds weigh heavily on our social consciousness. In this way, The 8th Day captivates us while making us quietly thankful that such a universe exists only in our imaginations — for now. Visit their Tumblr page for a fuller narrative of these stunning photographs. You can view the rest of Edwards’ work here.

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Burning Buns: A Lampshade, Made Entirely Out Of Bread

Yukiko Morita- Mixed MediaYukiko Morita- Mixed Media Yukiko Morita- Mixed Media Yukiko Morita- Mixed Media

When Japanese artist Yukiko Morita began working in a bakery as a teenager, she marveled at how cute baked bread was. She probably did not realize at the time that, years later, she would craft a way to make bread into a usable home decorative object.

Introducing her one-of-a-kind Pampshades at Tokyo Designers Week, Morita most certainly has a monopoly on the most glutinous lighting system. Although she declined to name a few secret ingredients, she listed the rest as: “Bread flour, salt, yeast, LED, batteries.” After the bread is baked, she covers it in resin, solidifying the form so it will not decompose.

“As the story goes, Morita worked in a bakery in her native Kyoto eight years ago, subsquently graduating from the Kyoto University of Arts in 2008 and reportedly launching Pampshades as early as 2010 (the name is a portmanteau of ‘pan’—French for bread, derived from the Latinpanem—and lampshade). The brief timeline on her website further notes that the first prototype dates back to 2007 and that she relocated to Kobe as of this year.” (Excerpt from Source and Source)

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Sponsored Post: Malibu’s Best Summer Ever Project

With summer in full swing we’re looking forward to lots of new adventures in the sun. Whether it’s hitting the beach with friends, going on a road trip to unseen sites, or throwing the ultimate party, we’re looking to make this summer the best one ever! The good folks at Malibu love summer just as much as the rest of us and have decided to help us start on the right foot by encouraging all of us to just say yes to fun, sun and adventure with their Best Summer Ever Project. All you need to do to get started is to visit their YouTube page and create your very own Best Summer Ever List out of hundreds of fun suggestions. If you’re feeling extra brave hit the random button and Malibu will randomly assign you your very own list! If that’s not enough starting on July 17th you can watch Malibu’s Youtube reality show where four friends spend forty days taking on 40 challenges. They’ll be in the drivers seat and you’ll get to watch all the fun and crazy shenanigans as they embark on their summer adventure. So on your mark, get set, Go! Your best summer ever awaits!

This post has been sponsored by Malibu.

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Placer Deshacer


Not really sure what Placer Deshacer (it seems they are a musical group with an alter-presence) is about but these pictures remind me of educational videos from the 70s and 80s, or the vague way that conceptual art is photographed. I love how the absence of color makes the human body look so mysterious and full of knowledge…

 

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Cezar Berger AKA Berje

Cezar Berger  AKA Berje is a brazilian illustrator who has a soft side for the dark side. His stippled drawings of demon skulls, goat men, and goblins borrow from traditional tattoo flash but take a left turn towards epic black metal graphics.

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