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Derek Weisberg

"I Didn't Mean to Touch Your Hand Ceramic", 28" x 10" x 8", 2009

"I Didn't Mean to Touch Your Hand Ceramic", 28" x 10" x 8", 2009

Derek Weisberg, is an artist working in Oakland CA. He is  primarily a figurative sculptor creating works which focus on emotions and the human condition.

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Judy Darragh’s economically friendly sculptures

Night/Fall, 2006 at Ramp Gallery in New Zealand

Night/Fall, 2006 at Ramp Gallery in New Zealand

Judy Darragh makes work using cheap, fun and discarded materials, pilfering objects directly from the op-shops and living rooms of ‘ordinary New Zealand’. Her finished artworks demonstrate a dense layering of familiar cliché’s played off against one another, re-configured and exaggerated. This contextual complexity is accompanied in Darragh’s work by a characteristic wit and delightfully irreverent sense of humour. During her prolific twenty year career her work has ranged from the ‘Queen of Kitsch’ era to the ‘grunge art’ of the mid nineties, and her new suit of sculptural works presents an interesting mixture of the two. (Text and images via Ramp Gallery).

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Tony Orrico’s Drawings Test The Limits Of Physical Movement

tony orrico performancetony orrico performancetony orrico performanceTony-Orrico performance

Since 2009, Tony Orrico has performed his Penwald drawings. Combining elements found in dance, theater and performance art, it explores repetitive movement for long periods of time, bringing drawing’s motion into peril with human physicality. The idea originates in finding a point when an act becomes more than just motor skills and crosses over into the creative process. In Tony’s case, this leaves an aesthetic mark on physical existence in the form of an abstract drawing.

After graduating with an MFA in Choreography from the University of Iowa, Tony joined Shen Wei and Trisha Brown Dance companies. As a principle, he performed in major cities around the globe, including Sydney Opera House. Both troupes known for an avant garde approach ensured that he was never far away from a serious art practice. When he was ready, this enabled him to use the experience he learned as a dancer and combine it with his passion for drawing. One of his first Penwald performances at Postmasters Gallery, NY in 2009, would set the stage for everything that followed. From there, he received an opportunity to perform at The National Academy Of Sciences in Washington DC, and  was soon taking his “Penwald” series to venues worldwide. He was one of the few selected to reappropriate performances from Marina Ambramovic’s retrospective, “The Artist is present” at New York’s Museum Of Modern Art, an experience he was honored to have.

His newest project, CARBON, further investigates the relationship between material, body and movement.  Again, testing the limits of physical, mental and creative capacity, Tony sleeps in a box of graphite broken off throughout the course of a day, from Mexican pottery bowls. The material is used as a metaphor for life and death. A few recent highlights include performances at The Metz-Pompidou, New Museum, BAM, and solo Exhibits at PPOW Gallery NY, MUAC Mexico and Shoshanna Wayne Gallery Los Angeles.

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Kendal Murray’s Incredibly Miniature Nature Scenes Built On Top Of Household Objects

miniature sculptures

miniature sculptures

miniature sculptures

 

Kendal Murray - Sculpture

Kendal Murray makes miniature sculptures inventing various scenes with miniature characters, but whose stories are life sized. Scenes of families at the beach or sailing toy sailboats, and friends exploring a perilous landscape of wood clothes pegs are some of Murray’s creations. Her invented landscapes built atop compact mirrors, bowls, glass jars and teapots, and clutch purses exist somewhere between their own world and our own. Because they’re built on regular, albeit mildly nostalgic objects, the viewer is reminded of their existence in our own world, but they also seem to live in their own contained reality, ending at the limits of the object.

Some scenes are more absurd than others, like a woman standing proudly naked in front of a fully clothes man beside a fence. Another that’s particularly funny is one of a woman being chased by a swan while a man (who was presumably accompanying her) wanders through high reeds. Other scenes are more mundane, like a couple flossing and bathing in a bathroom together.

According to Ignant, the artist sees the miniature sculptures as an opportunity to explore identity. She says that dreams are where we’re able to experiment with different identities, and her sculptures are a manifestation of that possibility. (Via Ignant)

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Kelley Smith’s little wildlife

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20 year old photographer Kelley Smith’s inanimate animals make me feel all warm and fuzzy.

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Falko Ohlmer

g_why_01 Working out of Hamburg, Germany, Falko Ohlmer is a man of many talents. Utilizing graphic design, typography, and illustration, Ohlmer creates other-worldly landscapes with his playful designs. His colorful aesthetic has been featured in design compilations, on tee shirts, and even on kite boards.

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Video Watch: Finding Your Voice

We’re happy to present the second installment of Hennessy’s mini documentary featuring Elliott Wilson, Founder of Rap Radar and Editor-in-Chief of Respect.  Follow Elliott through Brooklyn as he discusses how he became a prominent voice in hip-hop music and how he discovered his creative voice. Wilson advises that the only way for a young writer to find his voice is to keep writing; eventually you’re going to reach real opinions on a topic that’s important to you. Take a trip down the rabbit hole.  Watch more Hennessy videos and learn more about this movement at neverstopneversettle.com.

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Li Hongbo’s Hyper-extended Limbs

Chinese artist Li Hongbo explores the adaptability of his medium by playing with the concept of the children’s toy called ‘paper gourd’. This toy is made from a stack of interconnected sheets of thin paper that can be stretched to form new shapes. Li Hongbo’s paper figures challenge the human form. Resembling human bodies, they rebuild the idea of what the human form can look like. The flexibility of these sculptures allows for a hyper-extension of the limbs, creating abstraction from realism. These elongated limbs, which have the ability to tumble out from the figure’s barely distinguishable core, allow us to find a new, playful and anomalous aesthetic. (via)

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