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Textilen by Jeannine Han and Dan Riley

This performance is the culmination of a fascinating project by Jeannine Hann and David Riley to create textile based musical instruments. Below are images of the performance costumes and another video further detailing their process.

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Three Artists Who Transform Origami Into Incredible Fine Art

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer

Russian artist Pavel Platonov experimented with origami because of his inclination toward sharp, angular, geometric forms.  Better known as a photographer who works with a unique and surreal type of portraiture, Platonov’s sculptures have a reflective quality to them, allowing a viewer to learn something about himself while observing the work.  Bizarre and often placed in natural settings Platonov’s pieces allow a viewer to encounter and react to discovering something strange and out of place.

Interested in the idea of a final image juxtaposed with the process of achieving that final image, artist Marc Fichou experimented with the conceptual process of folding, and unfolding, origami forms.  Drawing attention to the way our mind makes the connection between the two contrasting images, which don’t directly or immediately resemble one another, Fichou creates works that are visually compelling, and intellectually engaging.

Born to teenage, Mexican-American gang members, artist Gerardo Hacer escaped to fantasy worlds via the art of origami.  Learning to make paper cranes at some point during his stay in a string of foster homes Hacer combined that outlet with an inspiration found in Calder’s Los Angeles sculpture, “The Four Arches.”  Hacer decided to become an artist and even changed his name, “Gomez-Martinez,” to “Hacer,” which means “to make” in Spanish.  Hacer became a sculpture who creates large-scale origami forms, engaging his original love for origami with his desire to create substantial and impressive works of art.

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George Boorujy’s Hyper-Realistic Paintings Confront The Viewer With Intense Animal Gazes

George Boorujy - Ink on Paper George Boorujy - Ink on Paper George Boorujy - Ink on Paper George Boorujy - Ink on Paper

George Boorujy is a New York-based artist who paints large-scale animal portraits with ink. His subjects are non-human inhabitants of North America, such as bluebirds, lynxes, vultures, and black bears. Each species is incredibly researched, and it shows; after visiting zoos and studying photographs, Boorujy recreates the animals with painstaking detail. Every feather and tuft of fur is accounted for, creating a palpable and almost hyper-realistic sense of texture and animation. Set against a white backdrop, the viewer gets the rare opportunity to study the animals and appreciate their distinctiveness and beauty.

There is no denying that Boorujy’s subjects have a way of demanding our attention; their silent, steady gazes drill into the soul, in a deeply personal encounter. When our eyes meet, the boundaries between “humans” and “animals” fall away into a greater awareness of cross-species consciousness. The following quoted statement from Colossal reveals the emotional and philosophical intent of Boorujy’s works:

“Boorujy challenges the viewer to confront both the animal and their preconceived notions about it. Through their gaze an interaction evolves with the wild that otherwise would have to be sought out or birthed from happenstance. However fleeting our exchanges with the wild are, an impression of their presence marks our memories. There is something mystical at play; a silent exchange that either moves us towards awareness or heightens our fear of the unknown.” (Source)

More of Boorujy’s works can be viewed on his website. (Via Hi-Fructose)

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Patricia Eichert

Patricia Eichert

Patricia Eichert, of Denmark, has a colorful, otherworldly way of photography. It took us a split-second (or more..) to determine if the models above were Christmas mannequins from the 60’s or something else, awesomely contemporary. Her very posed images make for conversation, speaking about youth, beauty, situations and to be human.

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Alex Kiessling’s Psychedelic Glitch Paintings Exist Between Reality And A Dream

Alex Kiessling - acrylic on canvas Alex Kiessling - acrylic on canvas Alex Kiessling - acrylic on canvas Alex Kiessling - acrylic on canvas

Multimedia artist Alex Kiessling works with different ideas of how the future can be. He combines the ideas of fine art and high technology. He has used robots as painting assistants and exhibited it through a live stream to a worldwide internet-based audience. This series of paintings give the impression that they were made with digital help. Their colorful layers are overlapped just like a screen print gone wrong, but of course this is intentional. But despite appearances, Kiessling has achieved this striking effect by painting acrylic on canvas – by hand.

The series, titled Shift, ties in with his larger ideas of augmented reality, simulation, hybrids, and the existence between reality and dream. He explains a bit more:

In the static scenes of my paintings, the protagonists remain mostly resident between the glaring colorfulness of virtual realities and darkness, which is inherent in most of our dream sequences and memories. Both of these worlds are paramount due to their systematic character, which is connected to the simulative, and are projection surfaces of the human psyche. (Source)

His paintings have the affect of dreaming – you feel like what you are seeing isn’t really right, and maybe you should look a little harder. He has a beautiful way of describing his work:

In my work I concentrate on dreams and all kinds of dreamlike structures and explore its borders and bridges to reality. I try to visualize the “no men`s land” between the absurdity in our existence and the concrete concerns that come with our human mind or spirit. I am fascinated by the interacting vibrations between virtual reality, dreams and the basic common ground of our world`s so called reality. (Source)

Kiessling is interested in fragmented identities, and the fact that most of us now-a-days live our lives out in many different spheres or realities – in the physical as well as the digital. His painting series Shift is just another visual exploration of the theme that is becoming more and more relevant to this generation. (Via SuperSonic Art)

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Brendan Scott Carroll’s Jersey Stories

Brendan Scott Carroll’s polaroids document the people and places in New Jersey . Each polaroid comes with an anecdote that is typewritten on the lower white margin of each Polaroid. The anecdotes are fictional or derived from personal memory, other people’s memories, and actual events.

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Artist Reveals The Actual Ingredients Behind Our Beloved Fast Food Meals

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BLT

Peter-Augustus-Photography-2

Pork Burger

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Hot Dog

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Nuggets

In his ongoing project “Mystery Meat”, Texas-born visual artist Peter Augustus explores the disconnect between mass-produced foods and their “natural”, unprocessed form. Augustus’ photo series depicts various fast food dainties with their ingredients stripped down to their primal state: chicken nuggets to chicken feet, BLT to pork legs, etc.

The idea for the project was born after Augustus moved to Hong Kong where he currently resides. Artist was fascinated by the local meat shops, exposing various animal parts to their customers. He claims that Westerners are rarely in touch with “anything that even closely represents what kind of animals we are eating”. Most often, we purchase processed, prepackaged and showcased meat products without even knowing the real source.

The deeper and more disturbing side to Augustus’ work is the very notion of “mystery meat”. What is often marketed as 100 percent meat product, in reality comprises of various contents. The gruesome trend of intransparency is especially present in fast food market.

“I hope to cause the viewer to take into account what the natural form of their food looks like. I think the work highlights a number of important debates, and it is not meant to be repulsive — just to raise awareness. It also touches on the longstanding debate of the quality of chicken and meat products and the use of unnatural fillers and hormones in the animal products we eat daily.”

(via Feature Shoot; Huffington Post)

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Haris Purnomo Paints Portraits Of An Indonesia Full Of A Painful Past

Haris Purnomo - acrylic and oil on canvasHaris Purnomo - acrylic and oil on canvas Haris Purnomo - acrylic and oil on canvas Haris Purnomo - acrylic and oil on canvas

Indonesian painter Haris Purnomo started painting babies covered with dragon tattoos over 20 years ago and has slowly included women and men into his oeuvre. Initially starting illustrating babies because “they were cute”, Purnomo quickly realized they could be a effective symbol for the Indonesian lower class. His portraits now include all ages, demographics and classes. Like some sort of branding or gang symbol, the faces he paints all bear a marking of a certain culture. They all belong to the same time and place. Purnomo was a painter during the time of the military dominated government of Suharto and his work shows a certain sort of forced introspection – a focus on pain and mysterious, subtle symbols.

His paintings are highly political as well as highly stylized. As a member of the Gerakan Seni Rupa Bary, The New Art Movement, and of PIPA, two innovative art movements from Indonesia in the seventies, he not only challenged Suharto’s power and the preexisting aesthetic, but also people’s understanding of their own culture. These are his own thoughts on why he produces artwork and it’s social importance:

Once we are faced with the necessity to make a choice or a stand, everything that makes up our backgrounds will play its part: time, age, economic, social and political considerations, idealism, behavior, creativity, et cetera. All these may alter, strengthen, undermine, or develop anything we believe, and the ‘Pipa’ artists are not exceptions in this. As a father seeing his children growing up I experience a sense of losing [sic], I feel the strong drive to give more attention to children, including others’ children; that is what has been going on in me Being hopeful about my children and wanting to be more attentive to children in every aspect, I think these two things provide the basis of the central theme of my works.(Source)

Purnomo’s artworks are not only culturally relevant for Indonesia, but can teach us a whole lot about the human condition, it’s strength, fragility, resilience and adaptability.

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