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Cicret’s Bracelet Projects A Touchscreen Phone Onto Your Wrist

Cicret Bracelet designCicret BraceletCicret Bracelet design

As we move further into the digital age, designers are looking for new ways to offer products that will make even portable devices obsolete. A new product by a company called Cicret is offering a bracelet that will enable the wearer to project the functions of his/her Smartphone onto their arm. Through a simple bracelet design, a series of sensors would pick up a smartphone’s signals and project it onto your wrist. Once projected, it will be fully functional as a phone on your skin. Depending on the amount of memory you choose, social media, email and web surfing functions would all be available in places you’ve never imagined before. Those who opt for more gigabytes could also play video games. It’s Bladerunner convenience with a flick of the wrist. A video on Cicret’s site demonstrated how an arm will now function as an ipad. A scary thought, when taking into consideration the ipad was only invented 5 years ago. The speed technology moves today is lightning fast. The company currently needs 1 million euros to make a prototype. According to a statement, they currently have close to 5,000 donors but it doesn’t mention how much money has actually been raised. If they can pull it off, Cicret has a cool chance of becoming successful, and in the process, put a few of the tech giants out of business. Another issue is cost. Currently, Google glass, a similar product, is selling for $1500. As a young startup and in order to compete, Cicret would have to offer their bracelet at a third of the price. Let the games begin. (via Designfaves)

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Matthieu Bourel’s Surreal Collages Are Quietly Strange

Matthieu Bourel - Collage

collage

Matthieu Bourel - Collage

Matthieu Bourel - Collage

Matthieu Bourel creates surreal collages that, despite their dream-like qualities, feel somehow rooted in reality. It might have something to do with his use of black and white photos, summoning up a specter of the past and lending a sort of mythic quality to his art.

In some of his pieces, it almost feels as though they’re still frames of a tall tale as opposed to utter fiction. They feel historically relevant, which, according to Bourel, is part of the intended effect. “When successful, all the elements fall together with irony and tension while all other realities are obliterated, leaving the viewer as participant inside the picture, with his own codes and connections,” Bourel explains. “The image then carries the weight of a personal reality.”

The phrase “personal reality” aptly encapsulates the quiet strangeness of his collages. Bloodless cross-sections of torsos and bodies are more contemplative than gruesome, as though they’re textbook diagrams.

Bourel describes his process as finding pictures and photographs that spark inspiration. He’s drawn to pictures that “evoke a fake history or inspire nostalgia for a period in time that never truly existed.”

“A piece often becomes about the search and desire to combine those emergent narrative symbols that seem charged with a familiar yet distant emotion,” Bourel says.

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Till Gerhard

Hamburg Germany based painter Till Gerhard’s images are psychedelic narratives with dark undertones filled with unsettling atmospheres.

“The scenes he chooses to memorialize—dimly felt moments from that tumultuous decade in 20th Century American history when counter-culture briefly flourished—are rendered with a discreet maleficence that belies their offbeat humor and whimsical color-scatterings. Thus, an otherwise banal preoccupation with “hippy bullshit” is transformed into effectual social commentary.”- David Marcus

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Dynamic Artists Join Forces To Create A Hybrid Series Of Disfigured Faces

Derek Albeck and Grady Gordon - Graphite and Monotype Derek Albeck and Grady Gordon - Graphite and Monotype

When two great artists come together with completely different styles, amazing things can happen. Artists Grady Gordon and Derek Albeck have come together to create a collaborative series in which Gordon starts one of their artworks, and Albeck will finish it. Both artists working in graphite, their work fits together naturally. However, there solo work provides a stark contrast to each other’s styles. Gordon often works in monotype, creating his pigment from ground up cow bones. His organic, abstract techniques could not be more different than his collaborator. Albeck’s work is exceptionally detailed, rendering photorealistic drawings with graphite. When you mix these two opposite methods of creating art together, the results are incredibly unique.

When Gordan and Albeck join forces, their work becomes a hybrid series of morphing, deformed faces that are not of this world. These highly expressive faces are missing many parts such as eyes, a nose, or a mouth at some times. Even the hand that is included in this series appears to have contorting fingers and twisted bones. The winding line work confuses our perception until we cannot tell which end is which, or even, which part is the inside or the outside of the head. You can see this captivating series at the exhibition Sometimes I See You Look At Me Like That at The Smoking Nun Gallery in San Francisco, Califonrnia. You don’t want to miss it, as it ends next month on July 17th.

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Dorothy & The Casualties Of War Toy Soldiers

 

Design collective Dorothy brings the hell of war to your toy chest. In July 2009 Colorado Springs Gazettea published a two-part series entitled “Casualties of War”. The articles focused on a single battalion based at Fort Carson in Colorado Springs, who since returning from duty in Iraq had been involved in brawls, beatings, rapes, drunk driving, drug deals, domestic violence, shootings, stabbings, kidnapping and suicides. Returning soldiers were committing murder at a rate 20 times greater than other young American males. A seperate investiagtion into the high suicide rate among veterans published in the New York Times in October 2010 revealed that three times as many California veterans and active service members were dying soon after returning home than those being killed in Iraq and Afghanistan combined. We hear little about the personal hell soldiers live through after returning home.

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Graham Caldwell’s Prismatic Hand Blown Glass Sculptures Mirror Myopic Organisms

Graham Caldwell - glass Graham Caldwell - glass  Graham Caldwell - glass Graham Caldwell - glass

Graham Caldwell sculpts intricate organic-like structures from hand blown glass. His artworks mirror natural life forms on a molecular level. He pulls, twists, stretches and blows 2,000 degree glass into all sorts of shapes, arranging them into globular, spiky, prismatic, concave, convex, and densely myopic configurations. Caldwell uses the hard shiny metallic properties of glass in contrast to the forms he is recreating. He references nature – flowers, leaves, tropical fronds, water drops, fly’s eyes and eyebrows, but chooses to present them in a man-made, futuristic, fractured, cubist fashion.

Using mirrors, metals, steel and epoxy he likes us to reflect on the way we see the world around us. His interest lies in the act of perceiving, the function of eyes, the purpose of lenses, and how sight works.

Much of my work focuses on glass as a conduit or modulating agent for light and its parallel in the functionality of the human eye: using a lens to flip an image of the world, upside down and backwards, into the brain where it is reassembled, through illusion and forensics. (Source)

Caldwell is the ultimate advocate for art as science. His process is all about trying to recreate an organic process through a completely manufactured one. He enjoys the tactility of glass and the bizarre shapes they can inhabit.

Imagine the shape that balloons take on when they’re half filled with water; now imagine them flash-frozen and sticking sideways into space. Glass, says Caldwell, “is a slowed-down, meaty version of water.” (Source) (Via Hi Fructose)

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Timothy Callaghan Passes The Time With Paint

Timothy Callaghan Timothy Callaghan Timothy Callaghan

With simplified brushstrokes and a sophisticated sense of color, Ohio-based painter Timothy Callaghan‘s most recent works carefully construct a narrative around the passing of time. His eye for immediacy takes the form of crumpled love letters, a buzzing neon sign and the stillness of shirts hanging in a closet—each piece a quiet, tongue-in-cheek observation of daily life.

Callaghan released his first book this week through William Busta Gallery, highlighting his own work, as well as that of several other contemporary artists working in observational painting. Definitely worth a look.

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Radiohead Producer Nigel Godrich’s Ultraísta Release New Video for their Single, Our Song



Ultraista who I just saw perform their U.S. debut at the Echoplex just last week have a new video for their single, Our Song. The band was in great spirits as they performed most, if not all the songs from their self-titled debut and made great use of their colorful videos during the set. The trio features Nigel Godrich from Radiohead producing fame, drummer extraordinaire, Joey Waronker and Laura Bettinson on vocals. They are playing at (le) poisson rouge in New York on October 24th so be sure to check them out before they head to much larger venues.

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