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Surreal Glowing Jellyfish Tank Installed In The Facade Of An Abandoned Building

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Artists Walter Hugo & Zoniel have created a surreal installation featuring a large-scale glowing jellyfish tank as part of the Liverpool Biennal. Located in the Toxteth district, the piece is installed in the facade of an abandoned garage. Closed during the day, it opens its shutters every evening at 10 pm and is live-streamed to the Gazelli Art House in London.

Unusual project, titled “The Physical Possibility of Inspiring Imagination in the Mind of Somebody Living”, is based on the juxtaposition between the harshness of an old derelict building and the dreamlike flow of these fragile underwater creatures. It aims to inspire local communities by showing that inspiration can happen anywhere at any time.

“We placed the work there so that it could be enjoyed outside of a gallery environment while people are just walking down the street, going to the shop or home. The response that we’ve had from people so far has been overwhelmingly positive. We’ve seen reactions ranging from excitement to disbelief to nonchalance.”

The psychedelic display was opened almost secretly from the public. Artists chose not to promote their project through press and marketing, rather focus on the residents of the area and rely on natural word-of-mouth. What’s more interesting is the link created between Liverpool and London by streaming live footage to the virtual screen at the Gazelli Art House.

The original installation is up until July 24 at 53 High Park Street in Liverpool. Digital versions of the artwork can be purchased here. (via thisiscolossal)

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Billowing Cloud Sculpture Represents The Amount Of Trash Accumulated In NYC In One Hour

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From afar, it’s unclear what this billowing, cloud-like sculpture is made of. Up close, however, you can see that it’s comprised of various plastic bottles that are strung together in round, pleasing shape. New York-based architects and designers  STUDIO KCA collected a combination of one gallon jugs, 16 and 24-ounce bottles and compiled them into this ethereal, massive structure. In total, the installation titled Head in the Clouds  is made from 53,780 containers to represent the amount of trash that’s thrown away in New York City in just one hour.

Beneath the cloud’s exterior is a small seating/dreaming pavilion that accommodates up to 50 people. It’s meant for visitors to contemplate the light and color filtering through the cloud, as well as our consumption problem and the impact on the environment. Sand, water, and a curved aluminum frame prove the structural integrity.

Head in the Clouds made its debut last year on New York’s Governor’s Island. The stay was temporary, and the studio is now looking for its next home. (Via Colossal)

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Dominic Wilcox And Four Other Artists Upcycle and Illuminate Found Objects

Dominic Wilcox

Dominic Wilcox

Sarah Frost

Sarah Frost

Gabriel Dishaw

Gabriel Dishaw

Robert Bradford

Robert Bradford

Through the metamorphic conversion of discarded paraphernalia given a second life, art created from materials otherwise destined for a landfill has turned waste into resource. In a conscious reflection of a recycled object’s inherent value as a cultural statement, the fragmented disarray of salvaged goods conjoin as a reflection on the surplus of consumerism. Computer relics and plastic toys from the 1990’s resurface as jarring, three-dimensional works that reestablish a value beyond their initial introduction as cultural commodities. Extending the life of goods long since forgotten, the immortalization of a wastefulness that continues to swell stands as not only a poignant reminder of the ecological decay resulting from our consumption, but the opportunity to revisit and remake otherwise quotidian, superfluous goods.

Working predominately, if not entirely, with upcycled goods, the following artists create stunning installation and sculptural works that are a visual whirlpool of texture, color and line.

Featured artists include Dominic Wilcox, Sarah Frost, Robert Bradford, Gabriel Dishaw and Elisabeth Higgins O’Conner.

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Harry Griffin’s Photos Paint A Bizzare Picture of Old Age

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What are you going to do when you’re retired? Will you tinker in your garage, enjoy making crafts, or go on giant sight-seeing trips? Photographer Harry Griffin paints portraits of old age in his series titled Gold Coast. Dentures, wrinkled hands, and an easy chair, and more showcase a quiet-yet-luxurious existence in a sunny place like South Florida.

The vividly-colored images are cropped compositions that are bizarre in the framing. Although we know that we’re looking at retirement, it’s hard to glean a lot of information about what we’re seeing. So, a guy taking out his dentures wrapped in green plastic is equal parts amusing and confusing. It doesn’t seem that different than the act of getting old itself – moving towards a life of easy living while at the same time finding yourself doing ridiculous-looking things to keep up  comfortable and entertained. (Via La Monda)

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Mystic Illustrations: Nicomi Nix Turner and Four Other Artists Illustrate The Occult

Nicomi Nix Turner

Daniel Martin Diaz

Amy Earles

William Crisafi

Playing on the enticement of the black mirror, or, the darker recesses of our own perceived realities, fascinations revolving around the occult has infiltrated and renegotiated the perceivable world as we know it to be. Contemporary examinations of the occult and mysticism has surged in creating a more modern vernacular of symbology rooted in spiritualism, skewing the tangible under the scope of what is sensed and experienced as opposed to what is seen. Confronting the enigma of the unknown, investigations of the preternatural have transformed the material world through its semi-erotic explorations of the unconscious and the supposed spirit world. Evoking a sense of histories long since passed, fascinations with the paranormal are found not only within its connotations with Surrealism and Dada, but has since found itself increasingly commercialized through a dilution into popular culture.

The following artists present an elusive understanding and reflection on mysticism and the occult. Straying from any form of irony, kitsch or inapt nostalgia, their employment of the occult acts instead as a new means of dialogue and spiritual resolve.

Featured artists include Nicomi Nix Turner, Daniel Martin Diaz, Jas Helena, Amy Earles, and William Crisafi.

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Evan Roth’s Ink Fingerprint Paintings Track Touchscreen Routines

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

Evan Roth - ink

American artist Evan Roth is no stranger to subverting digital culture into progressive art. In the past, Roth has developed a wall of gifs for Occupy the Internet and hacked the internet cache to create self-portraits, both of which fit neatly into his artist statement of “visualizing and archiving culture through unintended uses of technologies”. Drawing inspiration from hacker culture and philosophy, Roth helped found the Graffiti Research Lab, which merges graffiti with technology via projectile LEDs, which he used to famously tag the Brooklyn Bridge in 2008. For his Multi-Touch Paintings series, Roth tapped quite literally into a newly universal habit among people fully plugged into the digital era: that of using touchscreen devices. Created by “performing routine tasks on milt-touch hand held computing devices,” Roth used tracing paper and an ink pad to turn impressions of each finger swipe into stark paintings.

Each of Roth’s ink paintings are named after the task they’re depicting, from an entire wall of levels from Angry Birds to Twitter and e-mail check-ins. By turning mundane procedures we make on a day to day basis on our phones and tablets into textural studies, Roth blurs the line between the corporeal and the digital. One can’t help but be reminded of fingerprinting for identification when looking at the paintings, drawing a connection between the all-encompassing nature of technology in modern society and the lasting effects that may hold over our identities in the future. With iPhones that now literally use your fingerprint to access the device, it seems as though Roth’s paintings are even more prescient now than they were when he first premiered them in 2011.

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The Eerily Dissolving Faces of Henrietta Harris

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New Zealand-based illustrator Henrietta Harris, previously featured here, continues to compel the eye with her alluring and dreamily distorted portraits. In her pastel-toned watercolors, she renders the human figure fluid and infinite. Seemingly caught in moments of a romantic introspection bordering on spiritual transcendence, her subjects dissolve into swirls, scribbles, and line.

Here, Harris’s artistic process is inextricably fused with the completed portrait, and the creative act of art making is just as significant as the subject itself. Quick, doodled lines of primary and secondary colors become equally as material and substantial as the multiple-toned and shaded flesh itself, and the artist’s stream of consciousness thrillingly interrupts any objective reflection of reality. Individual identities collapse to form a whirlpool of ecstatic color, and the body itself becomes a cosmic landscape, revolving, twisting, and floating like a strange fleshy galaxy.

The intense movement of Harris’s work is balanced only by her soft, muted colors and the hushed expressions of her subjects. Peering sleepily downwards, her watercolor muses exude a quiet yet concentrated aura, as if lost in a meditative trance. Two-dimensional lines like static electricity course through three-dimensional bodies, slicing their features in two, and still they stare forward resolutely. Deconstructed perhaps by their own imaginations, they surrender themselves to the hand of the artist, which leaps and coils whimsically across the page. Take a look. (via The Inspiration Grid)
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Sponsored Post: Malibu’s Best Summer Ever Project

With summer in full swing we’re looking forward to lots of new adventures in the sun. Whether it’s hitting the beach with friends, going on a road trip to unseen sites, or throwing the ultimate party, we’re looking to make this summer the best one ever! The good folks at Malibu love summer just as much as the rest of us and have decided to help us start on the right foot by encouraging all of us to just say yes to fun, sun and adventure with their Best Summer Ever Project. All you need to do to get started is to visit their YouTube page and create your very own Best Summer Ever List out of hundreds of fun suggestions. If you’re feeling extra brave hit the random button and Malibu will randomly assign you your very own list! If that’s not enough starting on July 17th you can watch Malibu’s Youtube reality show where four friends spend forty days taking on 40 challenges. They’ll be in the drivers seat and you’ll get to watch all the fun and crazy shenanigans as they embark on their summer adventure. So on your mark, get set, Go! Your best summer ever awaits!

This post has been sponsored by Malibu.


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