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García de Marina Rearranges Mundane Objects Into Witty Compositions

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With a witty sense of humor and an inventive mind, Spanish artist García de Marina, creates photographs based on the reinvention of mundane items. How about reworking a couple of spoons for sunglasses, or a slim comb for a bar code ? No wonder Spanish poet José Luis Argüelles once referred to him as the “photographer who knows how to capture things we aren’t able to see.”

Marina’s compositions come to have this nostalgic feel, not only because maybe the objects he is using are reminiscent of our own lives, but mostly because perhaps, at some point in our lives, we’ve all come to re-imagine that which is around us. There is more than just a clever re-interpretation of objects here. If we look closely, the artist is proving his viewers with alternative observations, perhaps, an ultimate surprising escape to the mundanity of our world.

They are very simple images. I try to create images that are easy to understand-and that hopefully don’t need any kind of explanations. I want to make an impact, give my viewers a little surprise. I hope that they will inquire more, and do further examinations.

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What You See Is What You Get: Beer As Pantone

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Spanish graphic designer Txaber has come up with an ingenious idea. Now we can see what is on the inside – on the outside. He has teamed up the colors of different beer with various shades of Pantone. At this stage this snappy idea is only a design concept – Txaber has said no companies are interested in producing, “but hopefully they will see the light.” The simplicity of this packaging has struck a chord with many people, and is an expansion of a similar idea launched last year.

Called Beertone, two Swiss designers Alexander Michelbach and Daniel Eugster created a color wheel also based on Pantone guides. They envisioned a beer lover to assemble this color wheel and choose their preferred brew from it. Every type of beer has it’s own swatch with all relevant information: brewery name, alcohol content, an image of the bottle and numerical values for its color in CMYK, RGB, and HTML. With over 202 colors (and separate beer types) Michelbach and Eugster no doubt would have been kept busy taste testing.

Whether it is a color wheel or a yet-to-be-realized design concept, the idea of marketing brewed beer based on slick packaging seems to a popular one. Txaber’s approach is an elegant, simple, understated one and shows the best side of the world’s third most popular drink. Ranging from Pale Ale to Imperial Stout, these designers have got the range covered. “Because beer comes in more colors than yellow or blurry.” (Via Lost At E Minor)

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Andrew Salgado

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London based painter Andrew Salgado enjoys focusing on the language of emotion through the male body, and media usage. His paints are generously and passionately applied onto the canvas, as are his explorations through masculinity, identity, sexuality, etc.

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Hijacked Billboards Used For Political Street Art

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The Billbored series of artist Dan Bergeron (also known as fauxreel)  undermines the all to common visual language of advertising.  His hijacked billboards, particularly his series featuring Carl the Plastic Baby, challenges passers-by to consider what they see more deeply.  Like much of his work, Billbored investigates identity, consumerism, and the places they intersect.   Carl the Plastic Baby, for example, playfully offers an an easy alternative to actual children.  A website accompanying the billboard offers visitors the opportunity to buy a “child” of their own – their very own Carl delivered to their home.

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Michael Bevilacqua’s An Ideal For Living On View at GERING & LóPEZ GALLERY

Michael Bevilacqua current exhibit at Gering &Lopez Gallery in NYC  showcases a single, monumental painting titled An Ideal For Living; a canvas that the artist has spent more than the past year painting. As with a number of Bevilacqua’s works, the title references a particular source of music, in this case the 1978 debut album by the post-punk rock band Joy Division. The band became an obsession for Bevilacqua, so much so that the painting grew along with his focus, consuming his attention and mirroring his state of mind. Each song, each lyric began taking on particular significance for Bevilacqua, who found many parallels to his own life and reflected his outlook on his surroundings. An Ideal For Living in fact created the rhythm of the artist’s life over the past year, further loosening his painting style and bringing about a series of work that he refers to as ‘the New Dis Order.’ Clearly diaristic in nature, the 30’ painting features an eclectic mix of color, text, visual styles and process. As rich as one would expect a yearlong work to be, the painting is also nuanced, with areas of sharpness and clarity layered upon washes of color and moody hues. Juxtaposed against this singular outpouring, other new works take a different approach, becoming extremely minimal and hauntingly symbolic, drained of color or highly textured.

An Ideal For Living is on view at Gering &Lopez Gallery through August 24th.

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KEN REID’s World Wide Weirdies

I came across Ken Reid‘s work through various internet wanderings, and his humor and technical skills still blow me away every moment I look at them. His work bears resemblance to Basil Wolverton‘s, and both mastered the art of the humorously grotesque image which dominated 70’s comic magazines. It’s easy to see how work like this went on to influence ZAP Comix and WEIRDO, and these in turn went on to influence a large portion of contemporary independent and underground comix. Below is Reid’s WORLD WIDE WEIRDIES series, an extensive collection of visual puns inspired by different locations in the world, which originally appeared in WHOOPEE! and Shiver and Shake. Some of these fly right over my head, but its makes no difference when the imagery is as compelling as it is. ‘Nuff said.

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Crunkcore Posers, Indie Jesuses (Jesi?) and Scene Queens

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Illustrator Rob Dobi has created a cutting collection of archetypical scenesters on “Your Scene Sucks” that had me laughing outloud as I shamefully recognized incarnations of myself and just about everyone I know within these images. The dude above is my ex-boyfriend’s little brother’s best friend. Seriously though! Anyways, it’s kind of like “Homies” action figures, but for anyone young into music scenes. Check out his description for Indie Jesus!

“you sir, are grizzled! with a wardrobe that looks like it was donated to a thrift store by either crosby, stills or nash in 1971 and a beard that has its own zip code, this indie icon has a devout army of worshippers who follow his every whispered word.

the lethargic lo-fi lethario is known to lock himself in a cabin for months on end to craft minimalistic folksy songs. by the end of his self-imposed exile, all he has produced is a stream of hushed whispers with barely fingerpicked guitar strums….one might say his songs give them the chills, but that is only because they passed out listening and forgot to get a blanket.”

Rob Dobi if you are listening, where is the Late 70’s Revivalist high-waisted jean girl with wanna-be Farrah Fawcett feathered hair? You know, Allman Brothers band t-shirt (or other such shirt touting a bearded, mustchio-d, long-haired 70’s rock band), bellbottoms, leather jacket, turquoise rings? I think she stays in the cabin with indie Jesus. (aka, Me.) Ooh, and then the other off-shoot of that, those weird cross-Headband Bohemian Scenesters with those beaded braided headbands with feathers hanging off them?

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Gorgeous Photographs Of Shattered Flowers Soaked In Liquid Nitrogen

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After soaking them for thirty minutes in freezing liquid nitrogen, the New York based photographer Jon Shireman hurls flowers onto a hard, white surface, causing them to shatter into hundreds of pieces. The series, titled Broken Flowers, plays on our assumption that flowers are soft and supple; as an integral part of much still life photography, the blossoms normally symbolize youth and delicate feminine beauty. Under Shireman’s lens, however, the flora is transformed into something cold and hard. Against a sterile white backdrop, they appear sterile and brittle, a far cry from the spring buds that blow in the wind.

Throughout his career, Shireman has maintained a connection with flowers in decay; in other still lifes, he has cataloged the wilting of tulips and mums. This series, unlike those previous, is brutal and instantaneous. Where his other flowers underwent a slow, gradual death, these broken flowers are quickly frozen and violently ruptured. The process captured here is not a natural one but one that necessitates the use of a manmade element.

With almost surgical precision, Shireman’s lens focusses on the fallen flower, and he abandons the moody, romantic lighting he uses elsewhere in favor of high resolution and vivid color. Though flattened, the shattered blossoms maintain their basic structure; the bud, the stem, and the leaf can still be made out. The very veins of the plant are preserved by the liquid nitrogen. In this way, the flowers look like dead bodies in some unusual crime scene, outlined yet robbed of their living essence. Take a look. (via iGNANT, Feature Shoot, and Agonistica)

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