Get Social:

1000TimesYes

1000_boxCHRISTOPHER R. WEINGARTEN is a Brooklyn-based freelance music journalist whose work regularly appears in the Village Voice, RollingStone.com, Revolver and much more. In 2009 he vowed to review 1,000 new releases over Twitter.At the end of 2009 Weingarten set out to collaborate on a book version of the Twitter reviews with Article.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Charlie White

 

Charlie White’s work has always intrigued me. Since 1999 he has used a variety of methods to create eerie photographs that look like stills taken out of a horror movie.

 

This new body of work is a surprising departure from the previous work but still has the eerie feel that White’s work is known for. I couldn’t find much online about the series but the titles say a lot. The series is called ” Teen and Transgender Comparative Study.”

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Azuma Makoto Installs A Dazzling, 13-Foot Floral Tower In The Middle Of The Ocean

Azuma Makoro - Installation Azuma Makoro - Installation Azuma Makoro - Installation Azuma Makoro - Installation

Off the coast of Hinoba-an in the Negros Islands region of the Philippines, artist Azuma Makoto has constructed a floating, 13-foot-tall bouquet of Heliconia flowers and banana leaves. Shimmering against the ocean horizon in stark contrasts of red, green, and blue, the installation rises like a paradisiac mirage. Entitled “In Bloom #2,” the project juxtaposes terrestrial environments with the sea, bringing art and floral life where there would otherwise be open space. The following artist’s statement describes the construction and context of the art-island:

“A 4-meters long botanical sculpture consist[ing] of approximately 10,000 red Heliconia [was] installed on a simple raft used by the local fisherman. With nothing block[ing] the harsh sunlight, blown by salted water, the sculpture of flowers quietly floated in the cobalt blue ocean. The ocean accounts [for] 70% of the surface of the earth, and therefore it created [a] magnificent stage for the project.” (Source)

Following “Exobiotanica” — an exceptional project wherein Azuma sent boticanical arrangements into the stratosphere — “Bloom #2” demonstrates his creative goal to explore the visual and thematic effects of putting flowers in “environments where nature does not allow them to exist” (Source). The result is a detached form of beauty. Azuma’s work brings up questions of nature and place, and, by doing so, fosters an appreciation for the Earth’s harsh, disparate, and yet ultimately connected environments.

Click here to watch the video documentary of the construction of “Bloom #2,” and be sure to check out Azuma’s website to view more of his projects, including a collection of beautiful flowers embedded in ice, which we featured earlier this year. (Via Spoon & Tamago)

Currently Trending

John Baldessari And Five Other Artists Use Lists In Art

John Baldessari

John Baldessari

Mel Bochner

Mel Bochner

Erica Baum

Erica Baum

The end of 2013 is just around the corner and we are in the mode of individually and collectively reflecting back on the past year and looking towards the coming year.  The List is one of the ways we do this and the practice of making lists is in full force right now.  Lists like 50 Best Albums of 2013, Top Five Artists To Watch In 2014, Highest Paid Actors/Actresses Of The Year, the classic new years resolutions lists, and so on, are everywhere.  We are obsessed with lists.  And as I personally began compiling categorical articles that are essentially lists in their own right on Beautiful Decay in 2013, covering topics like 8 Heavy Metal Artists and 6 Artists Who Work With Trash, I felt it only appropriate to finish the year with a list based article covering artists who have used the format of the list in their artworks.

Currently Trending

Andres Guerrero

Andres Guerrero
Former White Walls Gallery owner Andres Guerrero has been making some epic skull and currency infused paintings that really pop. He has a show going up at Subliminal Projects in LA from February 6th through March 6th, so make sure you go check it out!

Currently Trending

Murat Palta Depicts Famous Movies In The Style Of The Ottoman Empire

A Clockwork Orange

A Clockwork Orange

Alien

Alien

Inception

Inception

Star Wars

Star Wars

Combining Western cinema and traditional Ottoman motifs, Turkish artist Murat Palta designed a series of images that blend the style of the Ottoman empire with films like Pulp Fiction, Alien, and Clockwork Orange. They are made to look historic and aged, and once you see past that, Palta has illustrated some of the iconic scenes of the particular film.

The Ottoman Empire, also known as the Turkish Empire, was one of the longest running empires in history. Palta’s works recall the Miniature Style of the Ottomans, which was a part of Ottoman book arts that included illumination, calligraphy, paper marbling, and bookbinding. Miniatures were usually not signed because they were not created entirely by one person. Production included the head painter who designed the composition, and his apprentices that drew the contours and then painted the scene.

Like the Miniature Style, Palta has included stylized two-dimensional characters, flattened views of architecture, and a lot of contrasting patterns. He references the Ottoman tradition while still making it his own – After all, I don’t think that the old illuminations included men beating someone senseless with a nightstick or a tiny green Yoda. (Via That’s Like, Whoa!)

Currently Trending

Mallory Morrison Captures The Frozen Beauty Of Women Floating And Falling In Water

Mallory Morrison- PhotographMallory Morrison- Photograph Mallory Morrison- PhotographMallory Morrison- Photograph

These stunning images come from photographer Mallory Morrison‘s latest series, FOG, and combine the unearthly nature of life underwater with the beauty of the human form. An experienced underwater photographer, Morrison works with models to push the limits of what is possible.

Poetic and succinct, her artist statement provides further explanation in the impetus behind her work on this series:

Our path is not always clear.  Finding our way through life, figuring out what we what and how to get it can be like searching aimlessly through a foggy abyss. In FOG, Morrison captures feelings of uncertainty, desperation, and ultimate release throughout a journey to the water’s surface.  These feelings also reflect Morrison’s artistic process of holding her breath underwater to capture each submerged form.  The series tells the story of accepting the unknown:  that which is on the other side of the surface and beyond the frame. 
Her dive into underwater photography began when she was photographing dancers, and found herself constantly pondering how to eliminate gravity as the barrier keeping her from the shots she wanted. After trying trampolines and other tricks in the air, Morrison decided to try water instead. Seen underwater, the figures have an otherworldly mysticism about them. The reflective underside of the water’s surface shows a warped mirror image, and infuses each photograph with an intriguing symmetry. The colors are muted and few, but beautiful, nearly translucent.

Currently Trending

Thomas Doyle

picture-282

New York sculptor Thomas Doyle works in miniature, creating detailed scenes capturing specific moments in his tiny people’s lives. Some of these moments are rather mundane, while others are epically dramatic. What all these sculptures share however, is best put in Doyle’s words:

The pieces’ radically reduced scales evoke feelings of omnipotence—as well as the visceral sensation of unbidden memory recall. Hovering above the glass, the viewer approaches these worlds as an all-seeing eye, looking down upon landscapes that dwarf and threaten the figures within.

Conversely, the private intensity of moments rendered in such a small scale draws the viewer in, allowing for the intimacy one might feel peering into a museum display case or dollhouse. Though surrounded by chaos, hazard, and longing, the figures’ faces betray little emotion, inviting viewers to lose themselves in these crucibles—and in the jumble of feelings and memories they elicit.

Currently Trending