Get Social:

Terrifying Images Of Ukraine Before And After The Recent Riots

kiev riots

kiev riots

kiev riots

Ukraine riots

Amidst the overwhelming violence seen in Ukraine’s recent riots, Gizmodo’s Jesus Diaz (an outsider) decides to create visually stunning, but heartbreaking images that explore Ukraine’s reactions to the sudden cultural and political changes.

By taking some of the techniques applied by Sergey Larenkov on his famous series, The Ghosts of World War II, Diaz creates images that merge shots of Kiev from before and after the Ukraine riots using the same vantage points. Through this technique, a masterful trick made possible by the almighty Photoshop, the viewer is able to experience two polar opposites: a happy, peaceful Ukraine, and a chaotic Ukraine.

Looking at the dramatic contrast between happy people enjoying the sun and peace and the anger of people behind in barricades is disheartening.

(via Sploid)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

IVÁN SANJUÁN

Spacey digital photo collages by Iván Sanjuán photo collage.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Arnaud Lajeunie Dyes The Color Of Ocean Waves In His Mesmerizing Photographs

arnaudlajeunie13arnaudlajeunie1 arnaudlajeunie3 arnaudlajeunie12

Often in our daily lives, something needs to be taken out of it’s normal context to be seen with renewed appreciation. In Arnaud Lajeunie‘s recent photoseries  Water meets colour, colour meets water, the Paris-based photographer explores new waves of seeing the constant ebb and flow of ocean waves by making them more visible, through the use of biodegradable, sugar-based dyes. Arnaud’s interventions tint the surging water with a plethora of colors, which are captured using an extremely fast shutter speed, which produces photos of violent, colorful takes of traditional landscape photography. Taken out of a normal context, one can see more clearly the natural beauty and fury. Says Arnaud, “Here, colour is seen as a raw material, as are the waves and the rocks. Colour adds density and thickness to transparent water, thus enhancing the flux fixation process.”

As writer Eugenia Lapteva notes in an essay on the series, Colours of Absence, “As the colours bleed into the sea, the texture of the water thickens and the motion of the waves is (re)defined, revealing its hidden course and complex networks. The crashing waves, which are carefully contained within the camera frame, pull the viewer into a vortex of frozen shapes and novel configurations that are otherwise indiscernible to the human eye.”

In his own words, the photographer explains, “I rely on the camera as a device with technical features that can give tangible shapes to ever-moving fluxes, in this case the waves. The high shutter speed transcends the human reflex of persistence of vision: it reveals existing shapes that the ‘mortal eye’ cannot perceive on its own.” (via mymodernmet)

Currently Trending

Alexandre Ciancio’s Nostalgic-Tinged Collages

ciancio-alexandre2 ciancio-alexandre4

For a trained architect, Alexandre Ciancio has taken an unexpected step in what to negate with his collage work series, Walkabout. By removing buildings, objects and landscape from the majority of his works, Ciancio manipulates the image so that the people photographed become objects themselves, a new visual architecture based on space, place and environment.

The Walkabout collages keep the black and white photographic qualities of an often wholesome, idealized past, and replace negative space with a soft pastel pallete, reminiscent of the same era. Depth is simultaneously given a flat quality, while figures are given a new background and environment, of their own creation. Ciancio poetically describes the series

“A walkabout, ie a multitude of people gathered in one place can be characterized by a container (location) and content (the crowd). With this definition it is thus possible to establish rules of the game: design images where all the spatial data are erased in favour of flat colours highlighting the different crowds and their relationship to space.

This rule is applied with six old black and white photographs, the various inhabitants of the images are highlighted by the lack of spatial information and the bright colours used to give depth to the images while giving them a degree of internal consistency .

These images are assembled diptych opponent whenever a frontal pose to pose in perspective. This dualism invites us into the image space and observe each of their people, their expressions, their eyes…”  (via mutantspace and the jealous curator)

Currently Trending

Dirty Beach TV

3223829623_3de759040b

If you’ve ever been to London and meandered along the Thames, chances are you’ve witnessed the Dirty Beach crew in action. But you don’t have to leave your seat to partake in the fun, nor to see what these purveyors of grainy sculptures are up to; just visit Dirty Beach tv… what more can I say… enjoy!

Currently Trending

Takashi Murakami’s First Full-Length Movie “Jellyfish Eyes” Will Blow You Away

60135357f259a2bf4fe641df4277_jellyfish-eyes jellyfish-eyes-takashi-murakami-yatzer-7

World-renowned art superstar Takashi Murakami (and his production company Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd.) has always dabbled in fine art mediums with a large splash of commercial elements, but his latest venture is taking on the largest popular medium of them all. Jellyfish Eyes is the artist’s first foray into live-action, full-length films, and from the looks of the incredible trailer, it will have all of the elements of Murakami’s “superflat” mix of high and low culture.

“Jellyfish Eyes tells the story of Masashi, a young boy who moves to a sleepy town in the Japanese countryside with his mother in the wake of a natural disaster. After returning home from his new elementary school one day, Masashi discovers a flying jellyfish-like creature whom he befriends and names Kurage-bo. Masashi soon discovers that all his classmates have similarly magical pets, known as F.R.I.E.N.D.s, which are controlled by electronic devices that the children use to battle one another. Despite their playful appearances, however, these F.R.I.E.N.D.s turn out to be part of a sinister plot that will threaten the entire town.”

 

Screening dates after the jump.

Currently Trending

Calamityware Combines Delicate Porcelain And Monster Attacks

Calamityware2 Calamityware3 tumblr_n54tz65DFm1qzcdbeo1_500

Made popular by the dinnerware imported by England from China during the 18th century, Willow pattern is a distinctive and delicate pattern. And probably the last place you would expect to see alien invasions, giant robots attacking cities and pterodactyls. Graphic designer and draughtsman Don Moyer started with a fairly basic premise, “I love to draw. The drawings I like best are those that make me laugh. Several years ago, I started drawing Calamityware —traditional willow-pattern dinner plates with a tranquil scene threatened by impending calamity.” Funded by a successful Kickstarter to realize his whimsical drawings into actual dinnerware, Moyer has realized his dream of correcting an ancient problem, that “too many plates have been too boring for too long.”If it all seems light-hearted, it really is. Moyer’s drawings retain the traditional line quality and palette of their inspiration, but add in sinking ships, flying monkeys, and villages on fire. These drawings are then transferred to blank plates and fired to set the illustrations. Definitely beats your grandmother’s antique china if laughter is what you are after.  (via mymodernmet)

Currently Trending

Alison Moyna Greene Finds Balance Between Pain And Beauty In Her Seemingly Tranquil Mandalas Made From Spines of Cacti And Rose Thorns

Alison Moyna Greene - Cactus Spines, Ink, WoodAlison Moyna Greene - Cactus Spines, Ink, WoodGreene24

In the endless patterns of mandalas, one can find tranquility through its sacred geometry. You can find this peace in the spiraling colors of the mandalas artist Alison Moyna Greene creates. However, things are not always what they seem in her work. What is mesmerizing and calm at first glance is actually rough and defensive up close. The artist constructs her mandalas with individual cactus spines that jut out of the surface at the viewer. The process of using such a harmful medium by hand does not only take an intense focus, but also can be physically harmful. However, this meditative process of picking this material, painting them individually, and placing them onto their surface is a practice of care and love. Greene takes something painful and turns it into beauty.

The incredibly metaphor for transformation and healing is realized through this intricate series. The artist explains that her work acknowledges the coexistence of light and darkness and explores the balance of both necessary elements. The mandala is a traditional symbol of harmony. In this harmony, we find brilliant colors and winding patterns. However, we also find sharp, unsafe objects that make up this symbol. This contrast makes Greene’s work even more beautiful as she finds comfort in the amazing transformation of suffering into serenity.

This series of artwork uses thorns and cactus spines as a metaphor of changing pain and suffering. The process of hand plucking, hand painting and hand placing speaks about the transformation of pain into beauty and fear into love.

– Alison Moyna Greene

Currently Trending